Definition of Dated. Meaning of Dated. Synonyms of Dated

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Definition of Dated

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Accommodated
Accommodate Ac*com"mo*date, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Accommodated; p. pr. & vb. n. Accommodating.] [L. accommodatus, p. p. of accommodare; ad + commodare to make fit, help; con- + modus measure, proportion. See Mode.] 1. To render fit, suitable, or correspondent; to adapt; to conform; as, to accommodate ourselves to circumstances. ``They accommodate their counsels to his inclination.' --Addison. 2. To bring into agreement or harmony; to reconcile; to compose; to adjust; to settle; as, to accommodate differences, a dispute, etc. 3. To furnish with something desired, needed, or convenient; to favor; to oblige; as, to accommodate a friend with a loan or with lodgings. 4. To show the correspondence of; to apply or make suit by analogy; to adapt or fit, as teachings to accidental circumstances, statements to facts, etc.; as, to accommodate prophecy to events. Syn: To suit; adapt; conform; adjust; arrange.
Annodated
Annodated An"no*da`ted, a. [L. ad to + nodus a knot.] (Her.) Curved somewhat in the form of the letter S. --Cussans.
Antedated
Antedate An"te*date`, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Antedated; p. pr. & vb. n. Antedating.] 1. To date before the true time; to assign to an earlier date; thus, to antedate a deed or a bond is to give it a date anterior to the true time of its execution. 2. To precede in time. 3. To anticipate; to make before the true time. And antedate the bliss above. --Pope. Who rather rose the day to antedate. --Wordsworth.
Caudated
Caudate Cau"date, Caudated Cau"da*ted a. [L. cauda tail.] Having a tail; having a termination like a tail.
Consolidated
Consolidated Con*sol"i*da`ted, p. p. & a. 1. Made solid, hard, or compact; united; joined; solidified. The Aggregate Fund . . . consisted of a great variety of taxes and surpluses of taxes and duties which were [in 1715] consolidated. --Rees. A mass of partially consolidated mud. --Tyndall. 2. (Bot.) Having a small surface in proportion to bulk, as in the cactus. Consolidated plants are evidently adapted and designed for very dry regions; in such only they are found. --Gray. The Consolidated Fund, a British fund formed by consolidating (in 1787) three public funds (the Aggregate Fund, the General Fund, and the South Sea Fund). In 1816, the larger part of the revenues of Great Britian and Ireland was assigned to what has been known as the Consolidated Fund of the United Kingdom, out of which are paid the interest of the national debt, the salaries of the civil list, etc.
Consolidated
Consolidate Con*sol"i*date, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Consolidated; p. pr. & vb. n. Consolidating.] 1. To make solid; to unite or press together into a compact mass; to harden or make dense and firm. He fixed and consolidated the earth. --T. Burnet. 2. To unite, as various particulars, into one mass or body; to bring together in close union; to combine; as, to consolidate the armies of the republic. Consolidating numbers into unity. --Wordsworth. 3. (Surg.) To unite by means of applications, as the parts of a broken bone, or the lips of a wound. [R.] Syn: To unite; combine; harden; compact; condense; compress.
Cuspidated
Cuspidate Cus"pi*date (k?s"p?-d?t), Cuspidated Cus"pi*da`ted (-d?`t?d), a. [L. cuspidatus, p. p. of cuspidare to make pointed, fr. cuspis. See Cusp.] Having a sharp end, like the point of a spear; terminating in a hard point; as, a cuspidate leaf.
Depredated
Depredate Dep"re*date, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Depredated; p. pr. & vb. n. Depredating.] [L. depraedatus, p. p. of depraedari to plunder; de- + praedari to plunder, praeda plunder, prey. See Prey.] To subject to plunder and pillage; to despoil; to lay waste; to prey upon. It makes the substance of the body . . . less apt to be consumed and depredated by the spirits. --Bacon.
Dilapidated
Dilapidate Di*lap"i*date, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Dilapidated; p. pr. & vb. n. Dilapidating.] [L. dilapidare to scatter like stones; di- = dis- + lapidare to throw stones, fr. lapis a stone. See Lapidary.] 1. To bring into a condition of decay or partial ruin, by misuse or through neglect; to destroy the fairness and good condition of; -- said of a building. If the bishop, parson, or vicar, etc., dilapidates the buildings, or cuts down the timber of the patrimony. --Blackstone. 2. To impair by waste and abuse; to squander. The patrimony of the bishopric of Oxon was much dilapidated. --Wood.
Dilapidated
Dilapidated Di*lap"i*da`ted, a. Decayed; fallen into partial ruin; injured by bad usage or neglect. A deserted and dilapidated buildings. --Cooper.
Elucidated
Elucidate E*lu"ci*date, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Elucidated; p. pr. & vb. n. Elucidating.] [LL. elucidatus, p. p. of elucidare; e + lucidus full of light, clear. See Lucid.] To make clear or manifest; to render more intelligible; to illustrate; as, an example will elucidate the subject.
Fecundated
Fecundate Fec"un*date, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Fecundated; p. pr. & vb. n. Fecundating.] [L. fecundare, fr. fecundus. See Fecund.] 1. To make fruitful or prolific. --W. Montagu. 2. (Biol.) To render fruitful or prolific; to impregnate; as, in flowers the pollen fecundates the ovum through the stigma.
Gravidated
Gravidated Grav"i*da"ted, a. [L. gravidatus, p. p. of gravidare to load, impregnate. See Gravid.] Made pregnant; big. [Obs.] --Barrow.
Incommodated
Incommodate In*com"mo*date, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Incommodated; p. pr. & vb. n. Incommodating.] [L. incommodare. See Incommode.] To incommode. [Obs.] --Bp. Hall.
Innodated
Innodate In"no*date, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Innodated; p. pr. & vb. n. Innodating.] [L. innodatus, p. p. of innodare; pref. in- in + nodus knot.] To bind up,as in a knot; to include. [Obs.] --Fuller.
Intimidated
Intimidate In*tim"i*date, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Intimidated; p. pr. & vb. n. Intimidating.] [LL. intimidatus, p. p. of intimidare to frighten; pref. in- in + timidus fearful, timid: cf. F. intimider. See Timid.] To make timid or fearful; to inspire of affect with fear; to deter, as by threats; to dishearten; to abash. Now guilt, once harbored in the conscious breast, Intimidates the brave, degrades the great. --Johnson. Syn: To dishearten; dispirit; abash; deter; frighten; terrify; daunt; cow.
Inturbidated
Inturbidate In*tur"bid*ate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Inturbidated; p. pr. & vb. n. Inturbidating.] [Pref. in- in + turbid.] To render turbid; to darken; to confuse. [R.] The confusion of ideas and conceptions under the same term painfully inturbidates his theology. --Coleridge.
Inundated
Inundate In*un"date, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Inundated; p. pr. & vb. n. Inundating.] [L. inundatus, p. p. of inundare to inundate; pref. in- in + undare to rise in waves, to overflow, fr. unda a wave. See Undulate.] 1. To cover with a flood; to overflow; to deluge; to flood; as, the river inundated the town. 2. To fill with an overflowing abundance or superfluity; as, the country was inundated with bills of credit. Syn: To overflow; deluge; flood; overwhelm; submerge; drown.
Invalidated
Invalidate In*val"i*date, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Invalidated; p. pr. & vb. n. Invalidating.] [From Invalid null.] To render invalid; to weaken or lessen the force of; to destroy the authority of; to render of no force or effect; to overthrow; as, to invalidate an agreement or argument.
Liquidated
Liquidate Liq"ui*date (l[i^]k"w[i^]*d[=a]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Liquidated (-d[=a]`t[e^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. Liquidating.] [LL. liquidatus, p. p. of liquidare to liquidate, fr. L. liquidus liquid, clear. See Liquid.] 1. (Law) To determine by agreement or by litigation the precise amount of (indebtedness); or, where there is an indebtedness to more than one person, to determine the precise amount of (each indebtedness); to make the amount of (an indebtedness) clear and certain. A debt or demand is liquidated whenever the amount due is agreed on by the parties, or fixed by the operation of law. --15 Ga. Rep. 321. If our epistolary accounts were fairly liquidated, I believe you would be brought in considerable debtor. --Chesterfield. 2. In an extended sense: To ascertain the amount, or the several amounts, of, and apply assets toward the discharge of (an indebtedness). --Abbott. 3. To discharge; to pay off, as an indebtedness. Friburg was ceded to Zurich by Sigismund to liquidate a debt of a thousand florins. --W. Coxe. 4. To make clear and intelligible. Time only can liquidate the meaning of all parts of a compound system. --A. Hamilton. 5. To make liquid. [Obs.] Liquidated damages (Law), damages the amount of which is fixed or ascertained. --Abbott.
Liquidated damages
Liquidate Liq"ui*date (l[i^]k"w[i^]*d[=a]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Liquidated (-d[=a]`t[e^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. Liquidating.] [LL. liquidatus, p. p. of liquidare to liquidate, fr. L. liquidus liquid, clear. See Liquid.] 1. (Law) To determine by agreement or by litigation the precise amount of (indebtedness); or, where there is an indebtedness to more than one person, to determine the precise amount of (each indebtedness); to make the amount of (an indebtedness) clear and certain. A debt or demand is liquidated whenever the amount due is agreed on by the parties, or fixed by the operation of law. --15 Ga. Rep. 321. If our epistolary accounts were fairly liquidated, I believe you would be brought in considerable debtor. --Chesterfield. 2. In an extended sense: To ascertain the amount, or the several amounts, of, and apply assets toward the discharge of (an indebtedness). --Abbott. 3. To discharge; to pay off, as an indebtedness. Friburg was ceded to Zurich by Sigismund to liquidate a debt of a thousand florins. --W. Coxe. 4. To make clear and intelligible. Time only can liquidate the meaning of all parts of a compound system. --A. Hamilton. 5. To make liquid. [Obs.] Liquidated damages (Law), damages the amount of which is fixed or ascertained. --Abbott.
Misdated
Misdate Mis*date", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Misdated; p. pr. & vb. n. Misdating.] To date erroneously. --Young.
Nodated
Nodated No"da*ted, a. [L. nodatus, p. p. of nodare to make knotty, fr. nodus knot. See Node.] Knotted. Nodated hyperbola (Geom.), a certain curve of the third order having two branches which cross each other, forming a node.
Nodated hyperbola
Nodated No"da*ted, a. [L. nodatus, p. p. of nodare to make knotty, fr. nodus knot. See Node.] Knotted. Nodated hyperbola (Geom.), a certain curve of the third order having two branches which cross each other, forming a node.
Outdated
Outdated Out*dat"ed, a. Being out of date; antiquated. [Obs.] --Hammond.
Oxidated
Oxidate Ox"i*date, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Oxidated; p. pr. & vb. n. Oxidating.] [Cf. f. oxyder. See Oxide.] (Chem.) To oxidize. [Obs.]
Postdated
Postdate Post"date`, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Postdated; p. pr. & vb. n. Postdating.] [Pref. post- + date.] 1. To date after the real time; as, to postdate a contract, that is, to date it later than the time when it was in fact made. 2. To affix a date to after the event.
Preconsolidated
Preconsolidated Pre`con*sol"i*da`ted, a. Consolidated beforehand.
Short-dated
Short-dated Short"-dat`ed, a. Having little time to run from the date. ``Thy short-dated life.' --Sandys.
The Consolidated Fund
Consolidated Con*sol"i*da`ted, p. p. & a. 1. Made solid, hard, or compact; united; joined; solidified. The Aggregate Fund . . . consisted of a great variety of taxes and surpluses of taxes and duties which were [in 1715] consolidated. --Rees. A mass of partially consolidated mud. --Tyndall. 2. (Bot.) Having a small surface in proportion to bulk, as in the cactus. Consolidated plants are evidently adapted and designed for very dry regions; in such only they are found. --Gray. The Consolidated Fund, a British fund formed by consolidating (in 1787) three public funds (the Aggregate Fund, the General Fund, and the South Sea Fund). In 1816, the larger part of the revenues of Great Britian and Ireland was assigned to what has been known as the Consolidated Fund of the United Kingdom, out of which are paid the interest of the national debt, the salaries of the civil list, etc.

Meaning of Dated from wikipedia

- Look up Date, Dates, date, dated, or dates in Wiktionary, the free dictionary....
- In banking, a post-dated cheque is a cheque written by the drawer (payer) for a date in the ****ure. Whether a post-dated cheque may be cashed or deposited...
- Egyptian kings, Zoser and Sneferu, independently dated to 2625 BC plus or minus 75 years, were dated by radiocarbon measurement to an average of 2800...
- The oldest dated rocks on Earth, as an aggregate of minerals that have not been subsequently broken down by erosion or melted, are more than 4 billion...
- essential to have as much information as possible about the material being dated and to check for possible signs of alteration. Precision is enhanced if...
- generally dated a w**** ahead. Monthlies (such as National Geographic Magazine) are generally dated a month ahead, and quarterlies are generally dated three...
- Morris and Clayton, scriveners and bankers based in the City of London, and dated 16 February 1659. In 1717, the Bank of England pioneered the first use of...
- officially released to the public by Billboard on Tuesday. Each chart is post-dated with the "w****-ending" issue date four days after the charts are refreshed...
- Anniversary of the City’s first charter, Derry City Council press release dated 7 July 2004, (accessed 15 December 2007) Archived 2 June 2008 at the Wayback...
- QUEEN has been pleased by Letters Patent under the Great Seal of the Realm dated 21st August 1996, to declare that a former wife (other than a widow until...
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