Definition of Carbona. Meaning of Carbona. Synonyms of Carbona

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Definition of Carbona

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acid sodium carbonate
Sodium So"di*um, n. [NL., fr.E. soda.] (Chem.) A common metallic element of the alkali group, in nature always occuring combined, as in common salt, in albite, etc. It is isolated as a soft, waxy, white, unstable metal, so readily oxidized that it combines violently with water, and to be preserved must be kept under petroleum or some similar liquid. Sodium is used combined in many salts, in the free state as a reducer, and as a means of obtaining other metals (as magnesium and aluminium) is an important commercial product. Symbol Na (Natrium). Atomic weight 23. Specific gravity 0.97. Sodium amalgam, an alloy of sodium and mercury, usually produced as a gray metallic crystalline substance, which is used as a reducing agent, and otherwise. Sodium bicarbonate, a white crystalline substance, HNaCO3, with a slight alkaline taste resembling that of sodium carbonate. It is found in many mineral springs and also produced artificially,. It is used in cookery, in baking powders, and as a source of carbonic acid gas (carbon dioxide) for soda water. Called also cooking soda, saleratus, and technically, acid sodium carbonate, primary sodium carbonate, sodium dicarbonate, etc. Sodium carbonate, a white crystalline substance, Na2CO3.10H2O, having a cooling alkaline taste, found in the ashes of many plants, and produced artifically in large quantities from common salt. It is used in making soap, glass, paper, etc., and as alkaline agent in many chemical industries. Called also sal soda, washing soda, or soda. Cf. Sodium bicarbonate, above and Trona. Sodium chloride, common, or table, salt, NaCl. Sodium hydroxide, a white opaque brittle solid, NaOH, having a fibrous structure, produced by the action of quicklime, or of calcium hydrate (milk of lime), on sodium carbonate. It is a strong alkali, and is used in the manufacture of soap, in making wood pulp for paper, etc. Called also sodium hydrate, and caustic soda. By extension, a solution of sodium hydroxide.
Bicarbonate
Bicarbonate Bi*car"bon*ate, n. [Pref. bi- + carbonate.] (Chem.) A carbonate in which but half the hydrogen of the acid is replaced by a positive element or radical, thus making the proportion of the acid to the positive or basic portion twice what it is in the normal carbonates; an acid carbonate; -- sometimes called supercarbonate.
Carbonaceous
Carbonaceous Car"bo*na`ceous, a. Pertaining to, containing, or composed of, carbon.
Carbonade
Carbonade Car"bo*nade, Carbonado Car`bo*na"do, n. [Cf. F. carbonnade, It. carbonata, Sp. carbonada, from L. carbo coal.] (Cookery) Flesh, fowl, etc., cut across, seasoned, and broiled on coals; a chop. [Obs.]
Carbonado
Carbonade Car"bo*nade, Carbonado Car`bo*na"do, n. [Cf. F. carbonnade, It. carbonata, Sp. carbonada, from L. carbo coal.] (Cookery) Flesh, fowl, etc., cut across, seasoned, and broiled on coals; a chop. [Obs.]
Carbonado
Carbonado Car`bo*na"do, n.; pl. Carbonadoes. [Pg., carbonated.] (Min.) A black variety of diamond, found in Brazil, and used for diamond drills. It occurs in irregular or rounded fragments, rarely distinctly crystallized, with a texture varying from compact to porous.
Carbonadoes
Carbonado Car`bo*na"do, n.; pl. Carbonadoes. [Pg., carbonated.] (Min.) A black variety of diamond, found in Brazil, and used for diamond drills. It occurs in irregular or rounded fragments, rarely distinctly crystallized, with a texture varying from compact to porous.
Carbonari
Carbonaro Car`bo*na"ro, n.; pl. Carbonari. [It., a coal man.] A member of a secret political association in Italy, organized in the early part of the nineteenth centry for the purpose of changing the government into a republic. Note: The origin of the Carbonari is uncertain, but the society is said to have first met, in 1808, among the charcoal burners of the mountains, whose phraseology they adopted.
Carbonarism
Carbonarism Car`bo*na"rism, n. The principles, practices, or organization of the Carbonari.
Carbonaro
Carbonaro Car`bo*na"ro, n.; pl. Carbonari. [It., a coal man.] A member of a secret political association in Italy, organized in the early part of the nineteenth centry for the purpose of changing the government into a republic. Note: The origin of the Carbonari is uncertain, but the society is said to have first met, in 1808, among the charcoal burners of the mountains, whose phraseology they adopted.
Carbonatation
Carbonatation Car`bon*a*ta"tion, n. [From Carbonate.] (Sugar Making) The saturation of defecated beet juice with carbonic acid gas. --Knight.
Carbonate
Carbonate Car"bon*ate, n. [Cf. F. carbonate.] (Chem.) A salt or carbonic acid, as in limestone, some forms of lead ore, etc.
Carbonated
Carbonated Car"bon*a`ted, a. Combined or impregnated with carbonic acid.
Decarbonate
Decarbonate De*car"bon*ate, v. t. To deprive of carbonic acid.
Hydrocarbonaceous
Hydrocarbonaceous Hy`dro*car`bo*na"ceous, a. Of the nature, or containing, hydrocarbons.
Hydrocarbonate
Hydrocarbonate Hy`dro*car"bon*ate, n. (a) (Old Chem.) A hydrocarbon. [Obs.] (b) (Chem.) A hydrous carbonate, as malachite.
Pollachius carbonarius
Pollock Pol"lock, n. [See Pollack.] (Zo["o]l.) A marine gadoid fish (Pollachius carbonarius), native both of the European and American coasts. It is allied to the cod, and like it is salted and dried. In England it is called coalfish, lob, podley, podling, pollack, etc.
Pollachius carbonarius
Cuddy Cud"dy, n. [Scot.; cf. Gael. cudaig, cudainn, or E. cuttlefish, or cod, codfish.] (Zo["o]l) The coalfish (Pollachius carbonarius). [Written also cudden.]
primary sodium carbonate
Sodium So"di*um, n. [NL., fr.E. soda.] (Chem.) A common metallic element of the alkali group, in nature always occuring combined, as in common salt, in albite, etc. It is isolated as a soft, waxy, white, unstable metal, so readily oxidized that it combines violently with water, and to be preserved must be kept under petroleum or some similar liquid. Sodium is used combined in many salts, in the free state as a reducer, and as a means of obtaining other metals (as magnesium and aluminium) is an important commercial product. Symbol Na (Natrium). Atomic weight 23. Specific gravity 0.97. Sodium amalgam, an alloy of sodium and mercury, usually produced as a gray metallic crystalline substance, which is used as a reducing agent, and otherwise. Sodium bicarbonate, a white crystalline substance, HNaCO3, with a slight alkaline taste resembling that of sodium carbonate. It is found in many mineral springs and also produced artificially,. It is used in cookery, in baking powders, and as a source of carbonic acid gas (carbon dioxide) for soda water. Called also cooking soda, saleratus, and technically, acid sodium carbonate, primary sodium carbonate, sodium dicarbonate, etc. Sodium carbonate, a white crystalline substance, Na2CO3.10H2O, having a cooling alkaline taste, found in the ashes of many plants, and produced artifically in large quantities from common salt. It is used in making soap, glass, paper, etc., and as alkaline agent in many chemical industries. Called also sal soda, washing soda, or soda. Cf. Sodium bicarbonate, above and Trona. Sodium chloride, common, or table, salt, NaCl. Sodium hydroxide, a white opaque brittle solid, NaOH, having a fibrous structure, produced by the action of quicklime, or of calcium hydrate (milk of lime), on sodium carbonate. It is a strong alkali, and is used in the manufacture of soap, in making wood pulp for paper, etc. Called also sodium hydrate, and caustic soda. By extension, a solution of sodium hydroxide.
Sodium bicarbonate
Sodium So"di*um, n. [NL., fr.E. soda.] (Chem.) A common metallic element of the alkali group, in nature always occuring combined, as in common salt, in albite, etc. It is isolated as a soft, waxy, white, unstable metal, so readily oxidized that it combines violently with water, and to be preserved must be kept under petroleum or some similar liquid. Sodium is used combined in many salts, in the free state as a reducer, and as a means of obtaining other metals (as magnesium and aluminium) is an important commercial product. Symbol Na (Natrium). Atomic weight 23. Specific gravity 0.97. Sodium amalgam, an alloy of sodium and mercury, usually produced as a gray metallic crystalline substance, which is used as a reducing agent, and otherwise. Sodium bicarbonate, a white crystalline substance, HNaCO3, with a slight alkaline taste resembling that of sodium carbonate. It is found in many mineral springs and also produced artificially,. It is used in cookery, in baking powders, and as a source of carbonic acid gas (carbon dioxide) for soda water. Called also cooking soda, saleratus, and technically, acid sodium carbonate, primary sodium carbonate, sodium dicarbonate, etc. Sodium carbonate, a white crystalline substance, Na2CO3.10H2O, having a cooling alkaline taste, found in the ashes of many plants, and produced artifically in large quantities from common salt. It is used in making soap, glass, paper, etc., and as alkaline agent in many chemical industries. Called also sal soda, washing soda, or soda. Cf. Sodium bicarbonate, above and Trona. Sodium chloride, common, or table, salt, NaCl. Sodium hydroxide, a white opaque brittle solid, NaOH, having a fibrous structure, produced by the action of quicklime, or of calcium hydrate (milk of lime), on sodium carbonate. It is a strong alkali, and is used in the manufacture of soap, in making wood pulp for paper, etc. Called also sodium hydrate, and caustic soda. By extension, a solution of sodium hydroxide.
Sodium carbonate
Sodium So"di*um, n. [NL., fr.E. soda.] (Chem.) A common metallic element of the alkali group, in nature always occuring combined, as in common salt, in albite, etc. It is isolated as a soft, waxy, white, unstable metal, so readily oxidized that it combines violently with water, and to be preserved must be kept under petroleum or some similar liquid. Sodium is used combined in many salts, in the free state as a reducer, and as a means of obtaining other metals (as magnesium and aluminium) is an important commercial product. Symbol Na (Natrium). Atomic weight 23. Specific gravity 0.97. Sodium amalgam, an alloy of sodium and mercury, usually produced as a gray metallic crystalline substance, which is used as a reducing agent, and otherwise. Sodium bicarbonate, a white crystalline substance, HNaCO3, with a slight alkaline taste resembling that of sodium carbonate. It is found in many mineral springs and also produced artificially,. It is used in cookery, in baking powders, and as a source of carbonic acid gas (carbon dioxide) for soda water. Called also cooking soda, saleratus, and technically, acid sodium carbonate, primary sodium carbonate, sodium dicarbonate, etc. Sodium carbonate, a white crystalline substance, Na2CO3.10H2O, having a cooling alkaline taste, found in the ashes of many plants, and produced artifically in large quantities from common salt. It is used in making soap, glass, paper, etc., and as alkaline agent in many chemical industries. Called also sal soda, washing soda, or soda. Cf. Sodium bicarbonate, above and Trona. Sodium chloride, common, or table, salt, NaCl. Sodium hydroxide, a white opaque brittle solid, NaOH, having a fibrous structure, produced by the action of quicklime, or of calcium hydrate (milk of lime), on sodium carbonate. It is a strong alkali, and is used in the manufacture of soap, in making wood pulp for paper, etc. Called also sodium hydrate, and caustic soda. By extension, a solution of sodium hydroxide.
sodium dicarbonate
Sodium So"di*um, n. [NL., fr.E. soda.] (Chem.) A common metallic element of the alkali group, in nature always occuring combined, as in common salt, in albite, etc. It is isolated as a soft, waxy, white, unstable metal, so readily oxidized that it combines violently with water, and to be preserved must be kept under petroleum or some similar liquid. Sodium is used combined in many salts, in the free state as a reducer, and as a means of obtaining other metals (as magnesium and aluminium) is an important commercial product. Symbol Na (Natrium). Atomic weight 23. Specific gravity 0.97. Sodium amalgam, an alloy of sodium and mercury, usually produced as a gray metallic crystalline substance, which is used as a reducing agent, and otherwise. Sodium bicarbonate, a white crystalline substance, HNaCO3, with a slight alkaline taste resembling that of sodium carbonate. It is found in many mineral springs and also produced artificially,. It is used in cookery, in baking powders, and as a source of carbonic acid gas (carbon dioxide) for soda water. Called also cooking soda, saleratus, and technically, acid sodium carbonate, primary sodium carbonate, sodium dicarbonate, etc. Sodium carbonate, a white crystalline substance, Na2CO3.10H2O, having a cooling alkaline taste, found in the ashes of many plants, and produced artifically in large quantities from common salt. It is used in making soap, glass, paper, etc., and as alkaline agent in many chemical industries. Called also sal soda, washing soda, or soda. Cf. Sodium bicarbonate, above and Trona. Sodium chloride, common, or table, salt, NaCl. Sodium hydroxide, a white opaque brittle solid, NaOH, having a fibrous structure, produced by the action of quicklime, or of calcium hydrate (milk of lime), on sodium carbonate. It is a strong alkali, and is used in the manufacture of soap, in making wood pulp for paper, etc. Called also sodium hydrate, and caustic soda. By extension, a solution of sodium hydroxide.
Subcarbonate
Subcarbonate Sub*car"bon*ate, n. (Chem.) A carbonate containing an excess of the basic constituent.
Sulphocarbonate
Sulphocarbonate Sul`pho*car"bon*ate, n. (Chem.) A salt of sulphocarbonic acid; a thiocarbonate.
Supercarbonate
Supercarbonate Su`per*car"bon*ate, n. (Chem.) A bicarbonate. [Obsoles.]
supercarbonate
Bicarbonate Bi*car"bon*ate, n. [Pref. bi- + carbonate.] (Chem.) A carbonate in which but half the hydrogen of the acid is replaced by a positive element or radical, thus making the proportion of the acid to the positive or basic portion twice what it is in the normal carbonates; an acid carbonate; -- sometimes called supercarbonate.
Thiocarbonate
Thiocarbonate Thi`o*car"bon*ate, n. (Chem.) A sulphocarbonate.

Meaning of Carbona from wikipedia

- "Carbona Not Glue" is a song by the Ramones from their second album, Leave Home (1977). "Carbona Not Glue" is a follow-up to "Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue"...
- Carbona may refer to: Carbona (moth), a genus of moth Carbona, California, United States Carbonne (Occitan: Carbona), France Delta Carbona L.P., an American...
- sound. The song "Carbona Not Glue" was taken off the album because it potentially violated the trademark of the stain-removal product Carbona. The track was...
- Carbona is a genus of moths of the family Noctuidae. Natural History Museum Lepidoptera genus database...
- Carbona is an unincorporated community in San Joaquin County, California, United States. Carbona is located on West Linne Road, 3.1 miles (5.0 km) south...
- Delta Carbona L.P. is a Fairfield, New Jersey-based American company which specializes in the production of stain-removal products. It was created in...
- neurological genetic disorders. It was founded in Dallas, Texas in 2012 by John Carbona after reorganizing a company called BioLife Cell Bank founded by Dr. David...
- Carbonne (Occitan: Carbona) is a commune in the Haute-Garonne department in southwestern France. The A64 autoroute p****es near the village, and there...
- Boyfriend" "Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue" "Havana Affair" "53rd & 3rd" "Carbona Not Glue" "Rockaway Beach" "Sheena Is a Punk Rocker" "Teenage Lobotomy"...
- Pocket" was mainly produced with the famous highly polished lustrous Colt Carbona Blue finish, also known as Charcoal bluing. The vest pocket features color-casehardening...
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