Definition of Car. Meaning of Car. Synonyms of Car

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Definition of Car

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A Carolinensis
Teal Teal, n. [OE. tele; akin to D. teling a generation, production, teal, telen to breed, produce, and E. till to cultivate. The English word probably once meant, a brood or flock. See Till to cultivate.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of small fresh-water ducks of the genus Anas and the subgenera Querquedula and Nettion. The male is handsomely colored, and has a bright green or blue speculum on the wings. Note: The common European teal (Anas crecca) and the European blue-winged teal, or garganey (A. querquedula or A. circia), are well-known species. In America the blue-winged teal (A. discors), the green-winged teal (A. Carolinensis), and the cinnamon teal (A. cynaoptera) are common species, valued as game birds. See Garganey. Goose teal, a goslet. See Goslet. Teal duck, the common European teal.
Acanthocarpous
Acanthocarpous A*can`tho*car"pous, a. [Gr. ? thorn + ? fruit.] (Bot.) Having the fruit covered with spines.
Acari
Acarus Ac"a*rus, n.; pl. Acari. [NL., from Gr. ? the cheese mite, tick.] (Zo["o]l.) A genus including many species of small mites.
Acaridan
Acaridan A*car"i*dan, n. [See Acarus.] (Zo["o]l.) One of a group of arachnids, including the mites and ticks.
Acarina
Arachnida A*rach"ni*da, n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. ? spider.] (Zo["o]l.) One of the classes of Arthropoda. See Illustration in Appendix. Note: They have four pairs of legs, no antenn[ae] nor wings, a pair of mandibles, and one pair of maxill[ae] or palpi. The head is usually consolidated with the thorax. The respiration is either by tranche[ae] or by pulmonary sacs, or by both. The class includes three principal orders: Araneina, or spiders; Arthrogastra, including scorpions, etc.; and Acarina, or mites and ticks.
Acarina
Acarina Ac`a*ri"na, n. pl. [NL., from Gr. ? a mite.] (Zo["o]l.) The group of Arachnida which includes the mites and ticks. Many species are parasitic, and cause diseases like the itch and mange.
Acarine
Acarine Ac"a*rine, a. (Med.) Of or caused by acari or mites; as, acarine diseases.
Acaroid
Acaroid Ac"a*roid, a. [NL., acarus a mite + -oid.] (Zo["o]l.) Shaped like or resembling a mite.
Acarpellous
Acarpellous Ac`ar*pel"lous, a. [Pref. a- not + carpel.] (Bot.) Having no carpels.
Acarus
Acarus Ac"a*rus, n.; pl. Acari. [NL., from Gr. ? the cheese mite, tick.] (Zo["o]l.) A genus including many species of small mites.
acid sodium carbonate
Sodium So"di*um, n. [NL., fr.E. soda.] (Chem.) A common metallic element of the alkali group, in nature always occuring combined, as in common salt, in albite, etc. It is isolated as a soft, waxy, white, unstable metal, so readily oxidized that it combines violently with water, and to be preserved must be kept under petroleum or some similar liquid. Sodium is used combined in many salts, in the free state as a reducer, and as a means of obtaining other metals (as magnesium and aluminium) is an important commercial product. Symbol Na (Natrium). Atomic weight 23. Specific gravity 0.97. Sodium amalgam, an alloy of sodium and mercury, usually produced as a gray metallic crystalline substance, which is used as a reducing agent, and otherwise. Sodium bicarbonate, a white crystalline substance, HNaCO3, with a slight alkaline taste resembling that of sodium carbonate. It is found in many mineral springs and also produced artificially,. It is used in cookery, in baking powders, and as a source of carbonic acid gas (carbon dioxide) for soda water. Called also cooking soda, saleratus, and technically, acid sodium carbonate, primary sodium carbonate, sodium dicarbonate, etc. Sodium carbonate, a white crystalline substance, Na2CO3.10H2O, having a cooling alkaline taste, found in the ashes of many plants, and produced artifically in large quantities from common salt. It is used in making soap, glass, paper, etc., and as alkaline agent in many chemical industries. Called also sal soda, washing soda, or soda. Cf. Sodium bicarbonate, above and Trona. Sodium chloride, common, or table, salt, NaCl. Sodium hydroxide, a white opaque brittle solid, NaOH, having a fibrous structure, produced by the action of quicklime, or of calcium hydrate (milk of lime), on sodium carbonate. It is a strong alkali, and is used in the manufacture of soap, in making wood pulp for paper, etc. Called also sodium hydrate, and caustic soda. By extension, a solution of sodium hydroxide.
Acrocarpous
Acrocarpous Ac`ro*car"pous, a. [Gr. ? extreme, highest + ? fruit.] (Bot.) (a) Having a terminal fructification; having the fruit at the end of the stalk. (b) Having the fruit stalks at the end of a leafy stem, as in certain mosses.
Agaricus muscarius
Muscarin Mus*ca"rin, n. (Physiol. Chem.) A solid crystalline substance, C5H13NO2, found in the toadstool (Agaricus muscarius), and in putrid fish. It is a typical ptomaine, and a violent poison.
Agaricus muscarius
Amanita Am`a*ni"ta, n. [NL. See Amanitine.] (Bot.) A genus of poisonous fungi of the family Agaricace[ae], characterized by having a volva, an annulus, and white spores. The species resemble edible mushrooms, and are frequently mistaken for them. Amanita muscaria, syn. Agaricus muscarius, is the fly amanita, or fly agaric; and A. phalloides is the death cup.
Agaricus muscarius
Fly amanita Fly amanita, Fly fungus Fly fungus . (Bot.) A poisonous mushroom (Amanita muscaria, syn. Agaricus muscarius), having usually a bright red or yellowish cap covered with irregular white spots. It has a distinct volva at the base, generally an upper ring on the stalk, and white spores. Called also fly agaric, deadly amanita.
Agaricus muscarius
Flybane Fly"bane`, n. (Bot.) A kind of catchfly of the genus Silene; also, a poisonous mushroom (Agaricus muscarius); fly agaric.
Alcarraza
Alcarraza Al`car*ra"za, n.; pl. Alcarrazas. [Sp., from Ar. al-kurr[=a]z earthen vessel.] A vessel of porous earthenware, used for cooling liquids by evaporation from the exterior surface.
Alcarrazas
Alcarraza Al`car*ra"za, n.; pl. Alcarrazas. [Sp., from Ar. al-kurr[=a]z earthen vessel.] A vessel of porous earthenware, used for cooling liquids by evaporation from the exterior surface.
Altincar
Altincar Al*tin"car, n. See Tincal.
Amanita muscaria
Amanita Am`a*ni"ta, n. [NL. See Amanitine.] (Bot.) A genus of poisonous fungi of the family Agaricace[ae], characterized by having a volva, an annulus, and white spores. The species resemble edible mushrooms, and are frequently mistaken for them. Amanita muscaria, syn. Agaricus muscarius, is the fly amanita, or fly agaric; and A. phalloides is the death cup.
Amanita muscaria
Fly amanita Fly amanita, Fly fungus Fly fungus . (Bot.) A poisonous mushroom (Amanita muscaria, syn. Agaricus muscarius), having usually a bright red or yellowish cap covered with irregular white spots. It has a distinct volva at the base, generally an upper ring on the stalk, and white spores. Called also fly agaric, deadly amanita.
Amphicarpaea monoica
Earthpea Earth"pea`, n. (Bot.) A species of pea (Amphicarp[ae]a monoica). It is a climbing leguminous plant, with hairy underground pods.
Anacardiaceous
Anacardiaceous An`a*car"di*a"ceous, a. (Bot.) Belonging to, or resembling, a family, or order, of plants of which the cashew tree is the type, and the species of sumac are well known examples.
Anacardic
Anacardic An`a*car"dic, a. Pertaining to, or derived from, the cashew nut; as, anacardic acid.
Anacardium
Anacardium An`a*car"di*um, n. [NL., fr. Gr. ? similar to + ? heart; -- the fruit of this plant being thought to resemble the heart of a bird.] (Bot.) A genus of plants including the cashew tree. See Cashew.
Anacardium occidentale
Cashew Ca*shew" (k[.a]*sh[=oo]"), n. [F. acajou, for cajou, prob. from Malay k[=a]yu tree; cf. Pg. acaju, cf. Acajou.] (Bot.) A tree (Anacardium occidentale) of the same family which the sumac. It is native in tropical America, but is now naturalized in all tropical countries. Its fruit, a kidney-shaped nut, grows at the extremity of an edible, pear-shaped hypocarp, about three inches long. Cashew nut, the large, kidney-shaped fruit of the cashew, which is edible after the caustic oil has been expelled from the shell by roasting the nut.
Angiocarpous
Angiocarpous An`gi*o*car"pous ([a^]n`j[i^]*[-o]*k[aum]r"p[u^]s), a. [Angio- + Gr. karpo`s fruit.] (Bot.) (a) Having fruit inclosed within a covering that does not form a part of itself; as, the filbert covered by its husk, or the acorn seated in its cupule. --Brande & C. (b) Having the seeds or spores covered, as in certain lichens. --Gray.
Anthochaera carunculata
Wattlebird Wat"tle*bird`, n. 1. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of honey eaters belonging to Anthoch[ae]ra and allied genera of the family Meliphagid[ae]. These birds usually have a large and conspicuous wattle of naked skin hanging down below each ear. They are natives of Australia and adjacent islands. Note: The best-known species (Anthoch[ae]ra carunculata) has the upper parts grayish brown, with a white stripe on each feather, and the wing and tail quills dark brown or blackish, tipped with withe. Its wattles, in life, are light blood-red. Called also wattled crow, wattled bee-eater, wattled honey eater. Another species (A. inauris) is streaked with black, gray, and white, and its long wattles are white, tipped with orange. The bush wattlebirds, belonging to the genus Anellobia, are closely related, but lack conspicuous wattles. The most common species (A. mellivora) is dark brown, finely streaked with white. Called also goruck creeper. 2. (Zo["o]l.) The Australian brush turkey.
Antiaris toxicaria
Upas U"pas, n. [Malay p?hn-?pas; p?hn a tree + ?pas poison.] 1. (Bot.) A tree (Antiaris toxicaria) of the Breadfruit family, common in the forests of Java and the neighboring islands. Its secretions are poisonous, and it has been fabulously reported that the atmosphere about it is deleterious. Called also bohun upas.
Antiaris toxicaria
2. A virulent poison used in Java and the adjacent islands for poisoning arrows. One kind, upas antiar, is, derived from upas tree (Antiaris toxicaria). Upas tieute is prepared from a climbing plant (Strychnos Tieute).

Meaning of Car from wikipedia

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