Definition of Cable. Meaning of Cable. Synonyms of Cable

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Definition of Cable

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Abdicable
Abdicable Ab"di*ca*ble, a. Capable of being abdicated.
Amicable
Amicable Am"i*ca*ble, a. [L. amicabilis, fr. amicus friend, fr. amare to love. See Amiable.] Friendly; proceeding from, or exhibiting, friendliness; after the manner of friends; peaceable; as, an amicable disposition, or arrangement. That which was most remarkable in this contest was . . . the amicable manner in which it was managed. --Prideoux. Amicable action (Law.), an action commenced and prosecuted by amicable consent of the parties, for the purpose of obtaining a decision of the court on some matter of law involved in it. --Bouvier. --Burrill. Amicable numbers (Math.), two numbers, each of which is equal to the sum of all the aliquot parts of the other. Syn: Friendly; peaceable; kind; harmonious. Usage: Amicable, Friendly. Neither of these words denotes any great warmth of affection, since friendly has by no means the same strength as its noun friendship. It does, however, imply something of real cordiality; while amicable supposes very little more than that the parties referred to are not disposed to quarrel. Hence, we speak of amicable relations between two countries, an amicable adjustment of difficulties. ``Those who entertain friendly feelings toward each other can live amicably together.'
Amicable action
Amicable Am"i*ca*ble, a. [L. amicabilis, fr. amicus friend, fr. amare to love. See Amiable.] Friendly; proceeding from, or exhibiting, friendliness; after the manner of friends; peaceable; as, an amicable disposition, or arrangement. That which was most remarkable in this contest was . . . the amicable manner in which it was managed. --Prideoux. Amicable action (Law.), an action commenced and prosecuted by amicable consent of the parties, for the purpose of obtaining a decision of the court on some matter of law involved in it. --Bouvier. --Burrill. Amicable numbers (Math.), two numbers, each of which is equal to the sum of all the aliquot parts of the other. Syn: Friendly; peaceable; kind; harmonious. Usage: Amicable, Friendly. Neither of these words denotes any great warmth of affection, since friendly has by no means the same strength as its noun friendship. It does, however, imply something of real cordiality; while amicable supposes very little more than that the parties referred to are not disposed to quarrel. Hence, we speak of amicable relations between two countries, an amicable adjustment of difficulties. ``Those who entertain friendly feelings toward each other can live amicably together.'
Amicable numbers
Amicable Am"i*ca*ble, a. [L. amicabilis, fr. amicus friend, fr. amare to love. See Amiable.] Friendly; proceeding from, or exhibiting, friendliness; after the manner of friends; peaceable; as, an amicable disposition, or arrangement. That which was most remarkable in this contest was . . . the amicable manner in which it was managed. --Prideoux. Amicable action (Law.), an action commenced and prosecuted by amicable consent of the parties, for the purpose of obtaining a decision of the court on some matter of law involved in it. --Bouvier. --Burrill. Amicable numbers (Math.), two numbers, each of which is equal to the sum of all the aliquot parts of the other. Syn: Friendly; peaceable; kind; harmonious. Usage: Amicable, Friendly. Neither of these words denotes any great warmth of affection, since friendly has by no means the same strength as its noun friendship. It does, however, imply something of real cordiality; while amicable supposes very little more than that the parties referred to are not disposed to quarrel. Hence, we speak of amicable relations between two countries, an amicable adjustment of difficulties. ``Those who entertain friendly feelings toward each other can live amicably together.'
Amicableness
Amicableness Am"i*ca*ble*ness, n. The quality of being amicable; amicability.
Applicable
Applicable Ap"pli*ca*ble, a. [Cf. F. aplicable, fr. L. applicare. See Apply.] Capable of being applied; fit or suitable to be applied; having relevance; as, this observation is applicable to the case under consideration. -- Ap"pli*ca*ble*ness, n. -- Ap"pli*ca*bly, adv.
Applicableness
Applicable Ap"pli*ca*ble, a. [Cf. F. aplicable, fr. L. applicare. See Apply.] Capable of being applied; fit or suitable to be applied; having relevance; as, this observation is applicable to the case under consideration. -- Ap"pli*ca*ble*ness, n. -- Ap"pli*ca*bly, adv.
Bridle cable
Bridle Bri"dle, n. [OE. bridel, AS. bridel; akin to OHG. britil, brittil, D. breidel, and possibly to E. braid. Cf. Bridoon.] 1. The head gear with which a horse is governed and restrained, consisting of a headstall, a bit, and reins, with other appendages. 2. A restraint; a curb; a check. --I. Watts. 3. (Gun.) The piece in the interior of a gun lock, which holds in place the tumbler, sear, etc. 4. (Naut.) (a) A span of rope, line, or chain made fast as both ends, so that another rope, line, or chain may be attached to its middle. (b) A mooring hawser. Bowline bridle. See under Bowline. Branches of a bridle. See under Branch. Bridle cable (Naut.), a cable which is bent to a bridle. See 4, above. Bridle hand, the hand which holds the bridle in riding; the left hand. Bridle path, Bridle way, a path or way for saddle horses and pack horses, as distinguished from a road for vehicles. Bridle port (Naut.), a porthole or opening in the bow through which hawsers, mooring or bridle cables, etc., are passed. Bridle rein, a rein attached to the bit. Bridle road. (a) Same as Bridle path. --Lowell. (b) A road in a pleasure park reserved for horseback exercise. Bridle track, a bridle path. Scolding bridle. See Branks, 2. Syn: A check; restrain.
Cable railway
Railroad Rail"road`, Railway Rail"way`, n. 1. A road or way consisting of one or more parallel series of iron or steel rails, patterned and adjusted to be tracks for the wheels of vehicles, and suitably supported on a bed or substructure. Note: The modern railroad is a development and adaptation of the older tramway. 2. The road, track, etc., with al the lands, buildings, rolling stock, franchises, etc., pertaining to them and constituting one property; as, certain railroad has been put into the hands of a receiver. Note: Railway is the commoner word in England; railroad the commoner word in the United States. Note: In the following and similar phrases railroad and railway are used interchangeably: Atmospheric railway, Elevated railway, etc. See under Atmospheric, Elevated, etc. Cable railway. See Cable road, under Cable. Perry railway, a submerged track on which an elevated platform runs, fro carrying a train of cars across a water course. Gravity railway, a railway, in a hilly country, on which the cars run by gravity down gentle slopes for long distances after having been hauled up steep inclines to an elevated point by stationary engines. Railway brake, a brake used in stopping railway cars or locomotives. Railway car, a large, heavy vehicle with flanged wheels fitted for running on a railway. [U.S.] Railway carriage, a railway passenger car. [Eng.] Railway scale, a platform scale bearing a track which forms part of the line of a railway, for weighing loaded cars. Railway slide. See Transfer table, under Transfer. Railway spine (Med.), an abnormal condition due to severe concussion of the spinal cord, such as occurs in railroad accidents. It is characterized by ataxia and other disturbances of muscular function, sensory disorders, pain in the back, impairment of general health, and cerebral disturbance, -- the symptoms often not developing till some months after the injury. Underground railroad or railway. (a) A railroad or railway running through a tunnel, as beneath the streets of a city. (b) Formerly, a system of co["o]peration among certain active antislavery people in the United States, by which fugitive slaves were secretly helped to reach Canada. Note: [In the latter sense railroad, and not railway, was used.] ``Their house was a principal entrep[^o]t of the underground railroad.' --W. D. Howells.
Cablelaid
Cablelaid Ca"ble*laid` (-l[=a]d`), a. 1. (Naut.) Composed of three three-stranded ropes, or hawsers, twisted together to form a cable. 2. Twisted after the manner of a cable; as, a cable-laid gold chain. --Simmonds.
Cablet
Cablet Ca"blet, n. [Dim. of cable; cf. F. c[^a]blot.] A little cable less than ten inches in circumference.
Communicable
Communicable Com*mu"ni*ca*ble, a. [Cf. F. communicable, LL. communicabilis.] 1. Capable of being communicated, or imparted; as, a communicable disease; communicable knowledge. 2. Communicative; free-speaking. [Obs.] --B. Jonson. -- Com*mu"ni*ca*ble*ness, n. -- Com*mu"ni*ca"bly, adv.
Communicableness
Communicable Com*mu"ni*ca*ble, a. [Cf. F. communicable, LL. communicabilis.] 1. Capable of being communicated, or imparted; as, a communicable disease; communicable knowledge. 2. Communicative; free-speaking. [Obs.] --B. Jonson. -- Com*mu"ni*ca*ble*ness, n. -- Com*mu"ni*ca"bly, adv.
Confiscable
Confiscable Con*fis"ca*ble, a. [Cf. F. confiscable.] Capable of being confiscated; liable to forfeiture.
Deprecable
Deprecable Dep"re*ca*ble, a. [L. deprecabilis exorable.] That may or should be deprecated. --Paley.
Despicable
Despicable Des"pi*ca*ble, a. [L. despicabilis, fr. despicari to despise; akin to despicere. See Despise.] Fit or deserving to be despised; contemptible; mean; vile; worthless; as, a despicable man; despicable company; a despicable gift. Syn: Contemptible; mean; vile; worthless; pitiful; paltry; sordid; low; base. See Contemptible.
Despicableness
Despicableness Des"pi*ca*ble*ness, n. The quality of being despicable; meanness; vileness; worthlessness.
Eradicable
Eradicable E*rad"i*ca*ble, a. Capable of being eradicated.
Excommunicable
Excommunicable Ex`com*mu"ni*ca*ble, a. [See Excommunicate.] Liable or deserving to be excommunicated; making excommunication possible or proper. ``Persons excommunicable .' --Bp. Hall. What offenses are excommunicable ? --Kenle.
Explicable
Explicable Ex"pli*ca*ble, a. [L. explicabilis: cf. F. explicable.] Capable of being explicated; that may be explained or accounted for; admitting explanation. It is not explicable upon any grounds. --Burke.
Explicableness
Explicableness Ex"pli*ca*ble*ness, n. Quality of being explicable.
Extricable
Extricable Ex"tri*ca*ble, a. Capable of being extricated. --Sir W. Jones.
Ferranti cables
Ferranti cables Fer*ran"ti ca"bles, Ferranti mains Fer*ran"ti mains" (Elec.) A form of conductor, designed by Ferranti, for currents of high potential, and consisting of concentric tubes of copper separated by an insulating material composed of paper saturated with black mineral wax.
Immedicable
Immedicable Im*med"i*ca*ble, a. [L. Immedicabilis. See In- not, and Medicable.] Not to be healed; incurable. ``Wounds immedicable.' --Milton.
Impacable
Impacable Im*pa"ca*ble, a. [L. pref. im- not + pacare to quiet. See Pacate.] Not to be appeased or quieted. [Obs.] --Spenser. -- Im*pa"ca*bly, adv.
Impeccable
Impeccable Im*pec"ca*ble, a. [L. impeccabilis; pref. im- not + peccare to err, to sin: cf. F. impeccable.] Not liable to sin; exempt from the possibility of doing wrong. -- n. One who is impeccable; esp., one of a sect of Gnostic heretics who asserted their sinlessness. God is infallible, impeccable, and absolutely perfect. --P. Skelton.
Implacable
Implacable Im*pla"ca*ble, a. [L. implacabilis; pref. im- not + placabilis: cf. F. implacable. See Placable.] 1. Not placable; not to be appeased; incapable of being pacified; inexorable; as, an implacable prince. I see thou art implacable. --Milton. An object of implacable enmity. --Macaulay. 2. Incapable of ebign relieved or assuaged; inextinguishable. [R.] O! how I burn with implacable fire. --Spenser. Which wrought them pain Implacable, and many a dolorous groan. --Milton. Syn: Unappeasable; inexorable; irreconcilable; unrelenting; relentless; unyielding.
Implacableness
Implacableness Im*pla"ca*ble*ness, n. The quality of being implacable; implacability.
Impracticable
Impracticable Im*prac"ti*ca*ble, a. 1. Not practicable; incapable of being performed, or accomplished by the means employed, or at command; impossible; as, an impracticable undertaking. 2. Not to be overcome, presuaded, or controlled by any reasonable method; unmanageable; intractable; not capable of being easily dealt with; -- used in a general sense, as applied to a person or thing that is difficult to control or get along with. This though, impracticable heart Is governed by a dainty-fingered girl. --Rowe. Patriotic butloyal men went away disguested afresh with the impracticable arrogance of a sovereign. --Palfrey. 3. Incapable of being used or availed of; as, an impracticable road; an impracticable method. Syn: Impossible; infeasible. -- Impracticable, Impossible. A thing is impracticable when it can not be accomplished by any human means at present possessed; a thing is impossible when the laws of nature forbid it. The navigation of a river may now be impracticable, but not impossible, because the existing obstructions may yet be removed. ``The barons exercised the most despotic authority over their vassals, and every scheme of public utility was rendered impracticable by their continued petty wars with each other.' --Mickle. ``With men this is impossible, but with God all things are possible.' --Matt. xix. 26.
Impracticableness
Impracticableness Im*prac"ti*ca*ble*ness, n. The state or quality of being impracticable; impracticability.

Meaning of Cable from wikipedia

- Cable may refer to: Nautical cable, an ****embly of three or more ropes woven against the weave of the ropes, rendering it virtually waterproof Wire rope...
- second-largest broadcasting and cable television company in the world by revenue and the largest pay-TV company, the largest cable TV company and largest home...
- Coaxial cable, or coax (pronounced /ˈkoʊ.æks/), is a type of electrical cable that has an inner conductor surrounded by a tubular insulating layer, surrounded...
- Cable (Nathan Summers) is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics, commonly in ****ociation with X-Force and...
- Cable television is a system of delivering television programming to consumers via radio frequency (RF) signals transmitted through coaxial cables, or...
- Home Box Office (HBO) is an American premium cable and satellite television network that is owned by the namesake unit Home Box Office, Inc., a division...
- An optical fiber cable, also known as a fiber optic cable, is an ****embly similar to an electrical cable, but containing one or more optical fibers that...
- Sir John Vincent Cable (born 9 May 1943) is a British politician serving as Leader of the Liberal Democrats and Member of Parliament for Twickenham since...
- cable and satellite television networks broadcasting or receivable in the United States, organized by genre. Some cable systems use one or more cable...
- A submarine communications cable is a cable laid on the sea bed between land-based stations to carry telecommunication signals across stretches of ocean...
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