Definition of Butterfly. Meaning of Butterfly. Synonyms of Butterfly

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Butterfly. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Butterfly and, of course, Butterfly synonyms and on the right images related to the word Butterfly.

Definition of Butterfly

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Asclepias butterfly
Asclepias As*cle"pi*as, n. [L., fr. Gr. ?, named from Asclepios or Aesculapius.] (Bot.) A genus of plants including the milkweed, swallowwort, and some other species having medicinal properties. Asclepias butterfly (Zo["o]l.), a large, handsome, red and black butterfly (Danais Archippus), found in both hemispheres. It feeds on plants of the genus Asclepias.
butterfly lily
Mariposa lily Ma`ri*po"sa lil`y [Sp. mariposa a butterfly + E. lily. So called from the gay apperance of the blossoms.] (Bot.) One of a genus (Calochortus) of tuliplike bulbous herbs with large, and often gaycolored, blossoms. Called also butterfly lily. Most of them are natives of California.
Butterfly ray
Ray Ray, n. [F. raie, L. raia. Cf. Roach.] (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous elasmobranch fishes of the order Rai[ae], including the skates, torpedoes, sawfishes, etc. (b) In a restricted sense, any of the broad, flat, narrow-tailed species, as the skates and sting rays. See Skate. Bishop ray, a yellow-spotted, long-tailed eagle ray (Stoasodon n[`a]rinari) of the Southern United States and the West Indies. Butterfly ray, a short-tailed American sting ray (Pteroplatea Maclura), having very broad pectoral fins. Devil ray. See Sea Devil. Eagle ray, any large ray of the family Myliobatid[ae], or [AE]tobatid[ae]. The common European species (Myliobatis aquila) is called also whip ray, and miller. Electric ray, or Cramp ray, a torpedo. Starry ray, a common European skate (Raia radiata). Sting ray, any one of numerous species of rays of the family Trygonid[ae] having one or more large, sharp, barbed dorsal spines on the whiplike tail. Called also stingaree.
Cabbage butterfly
Cabbage Cab"bage (k[a^]b"b[asl]j), n. [OE. cabage, fr. F. cabus headed (of cabbages), chou cabus headed cabbage, cabbage head; cf. It. capuccio a little head, cappuccio cowl, hood, cabbage, fr. capo head, L. caput, or fr. It. cappa cape. See Chief, Cape.] (Bot.) 1. An esculent vegetable of many varieties, derived from the wild Brassica oleracea of Europe. The common cabbage has a compact head of leaves. The cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, etc., are sometimes classed as cabbages. 2. The terminal bud of certain palm trees, used, like, cabbage, for food. See Cabbage tree, below. 3. The cabbage palmetto. See below. Cabbage aphis (Zo["o]l.), a green plant-louse (Aphis brassic[ae]) which lives upon the leaves of the cabbage. Cabbage beetle (Zo["o]l.), a small, striped flea-beetle (Phyllotreta vittata) which lives, in the larval state, on the roots, and when adult, on the leaves, of cabbage and other cruciferous plants. Cabbage butterfly (Zo["o]l.), a white butterfly (Pieris rap[ae] of both Europe and America, and the allied P. oleracea, a native American species) which, in the larval state, devours the leaves of the cabbage and the turnip. See Cabbage worm, below. Cabbage fly (Zo["o]l.), a small two-winged fly (Anthomyia brassic[ae]), which feeds, in the larval or maggot state, on the roots of the cabbage, often doing much damage to the crop. Cabbage head, the compact head formed by the leaves of a cabbage; -- contemptuously or humorously, and colloquially, a very stupid and silly person; a numskull. Cabbage palmetto, a species of palm tree (Sabal Palmetto) found along the coast from North Carolina to Florida. Cabbage rose (Bot.), a species of rose (Rosa centifolia) having large and heavy blossoms. Cabbage tree, Cabbage palm, a name given to palms having a terminal bud called a cabbage, as the Sabal Palmetto of the United States, and the Euterpe oleracea and Oreodoxa oleracea of the West Indies. Cabbage worm (Zo["o]l.), the larva of several species of moths and butterflies, which attacks cabbages. The most common is usually the larva of a white butterfly. See Cabbage butterfly, above. The cabbage cutworms, which eat off the stalks of young plants during the night, are the larv[ae] of several species of moths, of the genus Agrotis. See Cutworm. Sea cabbage.(Bot.) (a) Sea kale (b) . The original Plant (Brassica oleracea), from which the cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, etc., have been derived by cultivation. Thousand-headed cabbage. See Brussels sprouts.
Comma butterfly
Comma Com"ma, n. [L. comma part of a sentence, comma, Gr. ? clause, fr. ? to cut off. Cf. Capon.] 1. A character or point [,] marking the smallest divisions of a sentence, written or printed. 2. (Mus.) A small interval (the difference between a major and minor half step), seldom used except by tuners. Comma bacillus (Physiol.), a variety of bacillus shaped like a comma, found in the intestines of patients suffering from cholera. It is considered by some as having a special relation to the disease; -- called also cholera bacillus. Comma butterfly (Zo["o]l.), an American butterfly (Grapta comma), having a white comma-shaped marking on the under side of the wings.
Elm butterfly
Elm Elm, n. [AS. elm; akin to D. olm, OHG. elm, G. ulme, Icel. almr, Dan. & Sw. alm, L. ulmus, and E. alder. Cf. Old.] (Bot.) A tree of the genus Ulmus, of several species, much used as a shade tree, particularly in America. The English elm is Ulmus campestris; the common American or white elm is U. Americana; the slippery or red elm, U. fulva. Elm beetle (Zo["o]l.), one of several species of beetles (esp. Galeruca calmariensis), which feed on the leaves of the elm. Elm borer (Zo["o]l.), one of several species of beetles of which the larv[ae] bore into the wood or under the bark of the elm (esp. Saperda tridentata). Elm butterfly (Zo["o]l.), one of several species of butterflies, which, in the caterpillar state, feed on the leaves of the elm (esp. Vanessa antiopa and Grapta comma). See Comma butterfly, under Comma. Elm moth (Zo["o]l.), one of numerous species of moths of which the larv[ae] destroy the leaves of the elm (esp. Eugonia subsignaria, called elm spanworm). Elm sawfly (Zo["o]l.), a large sawfly (Cimbex Americana). The larva, which is white with a black dorsal stripe, feeds on the leaves of the elm.
milkweed butterfly
Monarch Mon"arch, n. [F. monarque, L. monarcha, fr. Gr. ?, ?; ? alone + ? to be first, rule, govern. See Archi-.] 1. A sole or supreme ruler; a sovereign; the highest ruler; an emperor, king, queen, prince, or chief. He who reigns Monarch in heaven, . . . upheld by old repute. --Milton. 2. One superior to all others of the same kind; as, an oak is called the monarch of the forest. 3. A patron deity or presiding genius. Come, thou, monarch of the vine, Plumpy Bacchus. --Shak. 4. (Zo["o]l.) A very large red and black butterfly (Danais Plexippus); -- called also milkweed butterfly.
Sea butterfly
Sea butterfly Sea" but"ter*fly` (Zo["o]l.) A pteropod.
Spirit butterfly
Spirit Spir"it, n. [OF. espirit, esperit, F. esprit, L. spiritus, from spirare to breathe, to blow. Cf. Conspire, Expire, Esprit, Sprite.] 1. Air set in motion by breathing; breath; hence, sometimes, life itself. [Obs.] ``All of spirit would deprive.' --Spenser. The mild air, with season moderate, Gently attempered, and disposed eo well, That still it breathed foorth sweet spirit. --Spenser. 2. A rough breathing; an aspirate, as the letter h; also, a mark to denote aspiration; a breathing. [Obs.] Be it a letter or spirit, we have great use for it. --B. Jonson. 3. Life, or living substance, considered independently of corporeal existence; an intelligence conceived of apart from any physical organization or embodiment; vital essence, force, or energy, as distinct from matter. 4. The intelligent, immaterial and immortal part of man; the soul, in distinction from the body in which it resides; the agent or subject of vital and spiritual functions, whether spiritual or material. There is a spirit in man; and the inspiration of the Almighty giveth them understanding. --Job xxxii. 8. As the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also. --James ii. 26. Spirit is a substance wherein thinking, knowing, doubting, and a power of moving, do subsist. --Locke. 5. Specifically, a disembodied soul; the human soul after it has left the body. Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was, and the spirit shall return unto God who gave it. --Eccl. xii. 7. Ye gentle spirits far away, With whom we shared the cup of grace. --Keble. 6. Any supernatural being, good or bad; an apparition; a specter; a ghost; also, sometimes, a sprite,; a fairy; an elf. Whilst young, preserve his tender mind from all impressions of spirits and goblins in the dark. --Locke. 7. Energy, vivacity, ardor, enthusiasm, courage, etc. ``Write it then, quickly,' replied Bede; and summoning all his spirits together, like the last blaze of a candle going out, he indited it, and expired. --Fuller. 8. One who is vivacious or lively; one who evinces great activity or peculiar characteristics of mind or temper; as, a ruling spirit; a schismatic spirit. Such spirits as he desired to please, such would I choose for my judges. --Dryden. 9. Temper or disposition of mind; mental condition or disposition; intellectual or moral state; -- often in the plural; as, to be cheerful, or in good spirits; to be downhearted, or in bad spirits. God has . . . made a spirit of building succeed a spirit of pulling down. --South. A perfect judge will read each work of wit With the same spirit that its author writ. --Pope. 10. Intent; real meaning; -- opposed to the letter, or to formal statement; also, characteristic quality, especially such as is derived from the individual genius or the personal character; as, the spirit of an enterprise, of a document, or the like. 11. Tenuous, volatile, airy, or vapory substance, possessed of active qualities. All bodies have spirits . . . within them. --Bacon. 12. Any liquid produced by distillation; especially, alcohol, the spirits, or spirit, of wine (it having been first distilled from wine): -- often in the plural. 13. pl. Rum, whisky, brandy, gin, and other distilled liquors having much alcohol, in distinction from wine and malt liquors. 14. (Med.) A solution in alcohol of a volatile principle. Cf. Tincture. --U. S. Disp. 15. (Alchemy) Any one of the four substances, sulphur, sal ammoniac, quicksilver, or arsenic (or, according to some, orpiment). The four spirits and the bodies seven. --Chaucer. 16. (Dyeing) Stannic chloride. See under Stannic. Note: Spirit is sometimes joined with other words, forming compounds, generally of obvious signification; as, spirit-moving, spirit-searching, spirit-stirring, etc. Astral spirits, Familiar spirits, etc. See under Astral, Familiar, etc. Animal spirits. (a) (Physiol.) The fluid which at one time was supposed to circulate through the nerves and was regarded as the agent of sensation and motion; -- called also the nervous fluid, or nervous principle. (b) Physical health and energy; frolicsomeness; sportiveness. Ardent spirits, strong alcoholic liquors, as brandy, rum, whisky, etc., obtained by distillation. Holy Spirit, or The Spirit (Theol.), the Spirit of God, or the third person of the Trinity; the Holy Ghost. The spirit also signifies the human spirit as influenced or animated by the Divine Spirit. Proof spirit. (Chem.) See under Proof. Rectified spirit (Chem.), spirit rendered purer or more concentrated by redistillation, so as to increase the percentage of absolute alcohol. Spirit butterfly (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of delicate butterflies of tropical America belonging to the genus Ithomia. The wings are gauzy and nearly destitute of scales. Spirit duck. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The buffle-headed duck. (b) The golden-eye. Spirit lamp (Art), a lamp in which alcohol or methylated spirit is burned. Spirit level. See under Level. Spirit of hartshorn. (Old Chem.) See under Hartshorn. Spirit of Mindererus (Med.), an aqueous solution of acetate of ammonium; -- named after R. Minderer, physician of Augsburg. Spirit of nitrous ether (Med. Chem.), a pale yellow liquid, of a sweetish taste and a pleasant ethereal odor. It is obtained by the distillation of alcohol with nitric and sulphuric acids, and consists essentially of ethyl nitrite with a little acetic aldehyde. It is used as a diaphoretic, diuretic, antispasmodic, etc. Called also sweet spirit of niter. Spirit of salt (Chem.), hydrochloric acid; -- so called because obtained from salt and sulphuric acid. [Obs.] Spirit of sense, the utmost refinement of sensation. [Obs.] --Shak. Spirits, or Spirit, of turpentine (Chem.), rectified oil of turpentine, a transparent, colorless, volatile, and very inflammable liquid, distilled from the turpentine of the various species of pine; camphine. See Camphine. Spirit of vitriol (Chem.), sulphuric acid; -- so called because formerly obtained by the distillation of green vitriol. [Obs.] Spirit of vitriolic ether (Chem.) ether; -- often but incorrectly called sulphuric ether. See Ether. [Obs.] Spirits, or Spirit, of wine (Chem.), alcohol; -- so called because formerly obtained by the distillation of wine. Spirit rapper, one who practices spirit rapping; a ``medium' so called. Spirit rapping, an alleged form of communication with the spirits of the dead by raps. See Spiritualism, 3. Sweet spirit of niter. See Spirit of nitrous ether, above.
Troilus butterfly
Troilus butterfly Tro"i*lus butterfly A large American butterfly (Papilio troilus). It is black, with yellow marginal spots on the front wings, and blue on the rear.

Meaning of Butterfly from wikipedia

- Butterflies are insects in the macrolepidopteran clade Rhopalocera from the order Lepidoptera, which also includes moths. Adult butterflies have large...
- A butterfly is a flying insect. Butterfly or butterflies may also refer to: Butterfly (corporation), a sporting goods equipment maker BBN Butterfly, a...
- Play media In chaos theory, the butterfly effect is the sensitive dependence on initial conditions in which a small change in one state of a deterministic...
- Madama Butterfly (IPA: [maˈdaːma ˈbatterflai]; Madam Butterfly) is an opera in three acts (originally two) by Giacomo Puccini, with an Italian libretto...
- In finance, a butterfly is a limited risk, non-directional options strategy that is designed to have a high probability of earning a limited profit when...
- The Butterfly Effect is a 2004 American science fiction thriller film written and directed by Eric Bress and J. Mackye Gruber, starring Ashton Kutcher...
- "To a Butterfly"   Stay near me—do not take thy flight!   A little longer stay in sight!   Much converse do I find in Thee,   Historian of my Infancy...
- boned and flattened. "Butterfly" comes from the resemblance of the cut to the wings of a butterfly. In butchery, butterflying transforms a thick, compact...
- Butterfly wings or similar phrasings may refer to: Lepidoptera wings, literal sense butterfly effect, a proverbial illustration of the chaos-theory idea...
- The butterfly effect is a metaphor for sensitive dependence on initial conditions in chaos theory. Butterfly effect may also refer to: Butterfly Effect...
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