Definition of As. Meaning of As. Synonyms of As

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word As. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word As and, of course, As synonyms and on the right images related to the word As.

Definition of As

as
A week or so will probably reconcile us. --Gay. Note: See the Note under Ill, adv. So . . . as. So is now commonly used as a demonstrative correlative of as when it is the puprpose to emphasize the equality or comparison suggested, esp. in negative assertions, and questions implying a negative answer. By Shakespeare and others so . . . as was much used where as . . . as is now common. See the Note under As, 1. So do, as thou hast said. --Gen. xviii. 5. As a flower of the field, so he flourisheth. --Ps. ciii. 15. Had woman been so strong as men. --Shak. No country suffered so much as England. --Macaulay. So far, to that point or extent; in that particular. ``The song was moral, and so far was right.' --Cowper. So far forth, as far; to such a degree. --Shak. --Bacon. So forth, further in the same or similar manner; more of the same or a similar kind. See And so forth, under And. So, so, well, well. ``So, so, it works; now, mistress, sit you fast.' --Dryden. Also, moderately or tolerably well; passably; as, he succeeded but so so. ``His leg is but so so.' --Shak. So that, to the end that; in order that; with the effect or result that. So then, thus then it is; therefore; the consequence is.
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As As, n. [See Ace.] An ace. [Obs.] --Chaucer. Ambes-as, double aces.
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As As, n.; pl. Asses. [L. as. See Ace.] 1. A Roman weight, answering to the libra or pound, equal to nearly eleven ounces Troy weight. It was divided into twelve ounces. 2. A Roman copper coin, originally of a pound weight (12 oz.); but reduced, after the first Punic war, to two ounces; in the second Punic war, to one ounce; and afterwards to half an ounce.
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Infinitive In*fin"i*tive, n. [L. infinitivus: cf. F. infinitif. See Infinite.] Unlimited; not bounded or restricted; undefined. Infinitive mood (Gram.), that form of the verb which merely names the action, and performs the office of a verbal noun. Some grammarians make two forms in English: (a) The simple form, as, speak, go, hear, before which to is commonly placed, as, to speak; to go; to hear. (b) The form of the imperfect participle, called the infinitive in -ing; as, going is as easy as standing. Note: With the auxiliary verbs may, can, must, might, could, would, and should, the simple infinitive is expressed without to; as, you may speak; they must hear, etc. The infinitive usually omits to with the verbs let, dare, do, bid, make, see, hear, need, etc.; as, let me go; you dare not tell; make him work; hear him talk, etc. Note: In Anglo-Saxon, the simple infinitive was not preceded by to (the sign of modern simple infinitive), but it had a dative form (sometimes called the gerundial infinitive) which was preceded by to, and was chiefly employed in expressing purpose. See Gerund, 2. Note: The gerundial ending (-anne) not only took the same form as the simple infinitive (-an), but it was confounded with the present participle in -ende, or -inde (later -inge).
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A A ([.a] emph. [=a]). 1. [Shortened form of an. AS. [=a]n one. See One.] An adjective, commonly called the indefinite article, and signifying one or any, but less emphatically. ``At a birth'; ``In a word'; ``At a blow'. --Shak. Note: It is placed before nouns of the singular number denoting an individual object, or a quality individualized, before collective nouns, and also before plural nouns when the adjective few or the phrase great many or good many is interposed; as, a dog, a house, a man; a color; a sweetness; a hundred, a fleet, a regiment; a few persons, a great many days. It is used for an, for the sake of euphony, before words beginning with a consonant sound [for exception of certain words beginning with h, see An]; as, a table, a woman, a year, a unit, a eulogy, a ewe, a oneness, such a one, etc. Formally an was used both before vowels and consonants. 2. [Originally the preposition a (an, on).] In each; to or for each; as, ``twenty leagues a day', ``a hundred pounds a year', ``a dollar a yard', etc.
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A A A barbarous corruption of have, of he, and sometimes of it and of they. ``So would I a done' ``A brushes his hat.' --Shak.
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A A An expletive, void of sense, to fill up the meter A merry heart goes all the day, Your sad tires in a mile-a. --Shak.
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Ferment Fer"ment, n. [L. fermentum ferment (in senses 1 & 2), perh. for fervimentum, fr. fervere to be boiling hot, boil, ferment: cf. F. ferment. Cf. 1st Barm, Fervent.] 1. That which causes fermentation, as yeast, barm, or fermenting beer. Note: Ferments are of two kinds: (a) Formed or organized ferments. (b) Unorganized or structureless ferments. The latter are also called soluble or chemical ferments, and enzymes. Ferments of the first class are as a rule simple microscopic vegetable organisms, and the fermentations which they engender are due to their growth and development; as, the acetic ferment, the butyric ferment, etc. See Fermentation. Ferments of the second class, on the other hand, are chemical substances, as a rule soluble in glycerin and precipitated by alcohol. In action they are catalytic and, mainly, hydrolytic. Good examples are pepsin of the dastric juice, ptyalin of the salvia, and disease of malt.
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Gastropoda Gas*trop"o*da, n. pl., [NL., fr. Gr. ?, ?, stomach + -poda.] (Zo["o]l.) One of the classes of Mollusca, of great extent. It includes most of the marine spiral shells, and the land and fresh-water snails. They generally creep by means of a flat, muscular disk, or foot, on the ventral side of the body. The head usually bears one or two pairs of tentacles. See Mollusca. [Written also Gasteropoda.] Note: The Gastropoda are divided into three subclasses; viz.: (a) The Streptoneura or Dioecia, including the Pectinibranchiata, Rhipidoglossa, Docoglossa, and Heteropoda. (b) The Euthyneura, including the Pulmonata and Opisthobranchia. (c) The Amphineura, including the Polyplacophora and Aplacophora.
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A A (named [=a] in the English, and most commonly ["a] in other languages). The first letter of the English and of many other alphabets. The capital A of the alphabets of Middle and Western Europe, as also the small letter (a), besides the forms in Italic, black letter, etc., are all descended from the old Latin A, which was borrowed from the Greek Alpha, of the same form; and this was made from the first letter (?) of the Ph[oe]nician alphabet, the equivalent of the Hebrew Aleph, and itself from the Egyptian origin. The Aleph was a consonant letter, with a guttural breath sound that was not an element of Greek articulation; and the Greeks took it to represent their vowel Alpha with the ["a] sound, the Ph[oe]nician alphabet having no vowel symbols. This letter, in English, is used for several different vowel sounds. See Guide to pronunciation, [sect][sect] 43-74. The regular long a, as in fate, etc., is a comparatively modern sound, and has taken the place of what, till about the early part of the 17th century, was a sound of the quality of ["a] (as in far). 2. (Mus.) The name of the sixth tone in the model major scale (that in C), or the first tone of the minor scale, which is named after it the scale in A minor. The second string of the violin is tuned to the A in the treble staff. -- A sharp (A[sharp]) is the name of a musical tone intermediate between A and B. -- A flat (A[flat]) is the name of a tone intermediate between A and G. A per se (L. per se by itself), one pre["e]minent; a nonesuch. [Obs.] O fair Creseide, the flower and A per se Of Troy and Greece. --Chaucer.

Meaning of As from wikipedia

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- as-Salām as-Sultānī (Arabic: نشيد السلام السلطاني‎, meaning "Royal Salute or Sultanic Salute") is the Sultanate of Oman's national anthem. The national...
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- "As Good as New" is a song recorded in 1979 by Swedish group ABBA, and was used as the opening track on their Voulez-Vous album. The lead vocals are by...
- As Good as It Gets is a 1997 American romantic comedy-drama film directed by James L. Brooks. It stars Jack Nicholson as a misanthropic and obsessive-compulsive...
- Rajkumar and Vishnuvardhan, he is counted in Kannada cinema's "triumvirate" as its most celebrated actors. With his debut in Puttanna Kanagal's National...
- significantly to the nutritional needs of terrestrial organisms by serving as a precursor to food and fertilizers. Ammonia, either directly or indirectly...
- singer and actress. Commonly referred to by the media as the Goddess of Pop, she has been described as embodying female autonomy in a male-dominated industry...
- As Sweet as Sin is the debut album by New Zealand band, the Bleeders released in 2006. It was recorded in 2005 in New Jersey. The track "Wild at Heart"...
- The As d'Or (Golden Ace) is a games award given out by a jury at the Festival International des Jeux in Cannes, France. The awards were established in...
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