Definition of Ancho. Meaning of Ancho. Synonyms of Ancho

Definition of Ancho. Meaning of Ancho. Synonyms of Ancho

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Ancho. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Ancho and, of course, Ancho synonyms and on the right images related to the word Ancho.

Definition of Ancho

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Amarantus melancholicus
Flower-gentle Flow"er-gen`tle, n. (Bot.) A species of amaranth (Amarantus melancholicus).
Anchor
Anchor An"chor, n. [OE. anker, ancre, AS. ancra, fr. L. anachoreta. See Anchoret.] An anchoret. [Obs.] --Shak.
Anchor
Anchor An"chor, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Anchored; p. pr. & vb. n. Anchoring.] [Cf. F. ancrer.] 1. To place at anchor; to secure by an anchor; as, to anchor a ship. 2. To fix or fasten; to fix in a stable condition; as, to anchor the cables of a suspension bridge. Till that my nails were anchored in thine eyes. --Shak.
Anchor
Anchor An"chor, v. i. 1. To cast anchor; to come to anchor; as, our ship (or the captain) anchored in the stream. 2. To stop; to fix or rest. My invention . . . anchors on Isabel. --Shak.
Anchor escapement
Anchor escapement An"chor es*cape"ment (Horol.) (a) The common recoil escapement. (b) A variety of the lever escapement with a wide impulse pin.
Anchor light
Anchor light Anchor light (Naut.) The lantern shown at night by a vessel at anchor. International rules of the road require vessels at anchor to carry from sunset to sunrise a single white light forward if under 150 feet in length, and if longer, two such lights, one near the stern and one forward.
anchor ring
Tore Tore, n. [See Torus.] 1. (Arch.) Same as Torus. 2. (Geom.) (a) The surface described by the circumference of a circle revolving about a straight line in its own plane. (b) The solid inclosed by such a surface; -- sometimes called an anchor ring.
Anchor shot
Anchor shot Anchor shot (Billiards) A shot made with the object balls in an anchor space.
Anchor space
Anchor space Anchor space (Billiards) In the balk-line game, any of eight spaces, 7 inches by 31/2, lying along a cushion and bisected transversely by a balk line. Object balls in an anchor space are treated as in balk.
Anchor watch
Anchor watch Anchor watch (Naut.) A detail of one or more men who keep watch on deck at night when a vessel is at anchor.
Anchorable
Anchorable An"chor*a*ble, a. Fit for anchorage.
Anchorage
Anchorage An"chor*age, n. 1. The act of anchoring, or the condition of lying at anchor. 2. A place suitable for anchoring or where ships anchor; a hold for an anchor. 3. The set of anchors belonging to a ship. 4. Something which holds like an anchor; a hold; as, the anchorages of the Brooklyn Bridge. 5. Something on which one may depend for security; ground of trust. 6. A toll for anchoring; anchorage duties. --Johnson.
Anchorage
Anchorage An"cho*rage, n. Abode of an anchoret.
Anchorate
Anchorate An"chor*ate, a. Anchor-shaped.
Anchored
Anchor An"chor, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Anchored; p. pr. & vb. n. Anchoring.] [Cf. F. ancrer.] 1. To place at anchor; to secure by an anchor; as, to anchor a ship. 2. To fix or fasten; to fix in a stable condition; as, to anchor the cables of a suspension bridge. Till that my nails were anchored in thine eyes. --Shak.
Anchored
Anchored An"chored, a. 1. Held by an anchor; at anchor; held safely; as, an anchored bark; also, shaped like an anchor; forked; as, an anchored tongue. 2. (Her.) Having the extremities turned back, like the flukes of an anchor; as, an anchored cross. [Sometimes spelt ancred.]
Anchoress
Anchoress An"cho*ress, n. A female anchoret. And there, a saintly anchoress, she dwelt. --Wordsworth.
Anchoretic
Anchoretic An`cho*ret"ic, Anchoretical An`cho*ret"ic*al, a. [Cf. Gr. ?.] Pertaining to an anchoret or hermit; after the manner of an anchoret.
Anchoretical
Anchoretic An`cho*ret"ic, Anchoretical An`cho*ret"ic*al, a. [Cf. Gr. ?.] Pertaining to an anchoret or hermit; after the manner of an anchoret.
Anchoretish
Anchoretish An"cho*ret`ish, a. Hermitlike.
Anchoretism
Anchoretism An"cho*ret*ism, n. The practice or mode of life of an anchoret.
Anchor-hold
Anchor-hold An"chor-hold`, n. 1. The hold or grip of an anchor, or that to which it holds. 2. Hence: Firm hold: security.
Anchoring
Anchor An"chor, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Anchored; p. pr. & vb. n. Anchoring.] [Cf. F. ancrer.] 1. To place at anchor; to secure by an anchor; as, to anchor a ship. 2. To fix or fasten; to fix in a stable condition; as, to anchor the cables of a suspension bridge. Till that my nails were anchored in thine eyes. --Shak.
Anchorite
Anchorite An"cho*rite, n. Same as Anchoret.
Anchoritess
Anchoritess An"cho*ri`tess, n. An anchoress. [R.]
Anchorless
Anchorless An"chor*less, a. Without an anchor or stay. Hence: Drifting; unsettled.
Anchovy
Anchovy An*cho"vy ([a^]n*ch[=o]"v[y^]), n. [Sp. anchoa, anchova, or Pg. anchova, prob. of Iberian origin, and lit. a dried or pickled fish, fr. Bisc. antzua dry: cf. D. anchovis, F. anchois.] (Zo["o]l.) A small fish, about three inches in length, of the Herring family (Engraulis encrasicholus), caught in vast numbers in the Mediterranean, and pickled for exportation. The name is also applied to several allied species.
Anchovy pear
Anchovy pear An*cho"vy pear` ([a^]n*ch[=o]"v[y^] p[^a]r`). (Bot.) A West Indian fruit like the mango in taste, sometimes pickled; also, the tree (Grias cauliflora) bearing this fruit.
Drift anchor
Drift Drift, a. That causes drifting or that is drifted; movable by wind or currents; as, drift currents; drift ice; drift mud. --Kane. Drift anchor. See Sea anchor, and also Drag sail, under Drag, n. Drift epoch (Geol.), the glacial epoch. Drift net, a kind of fishing net. Drift sail. Same as Drag sail. See under Drag, n.
Floating anchor
Floating Float"ing, a. 1. Buoyed upon or in a fluid; a, the floating timbers of a wreck; floating motes in the air. 2. Free or lose from the usual attachment; as, the floating ribs in man and some other animals. 3. Not funded; not fixed, invested, or determined; as, floating capital; a floating debt. Trade was at an end. Floating capital had been withdrawn in great masses from the island. --Macaulay. Floating anchor (Naut.), a drag or sea anchor; drag sail. Floating battery (Mil.), a battery erected on rafts or the hulls of ships, chiefly for the defense of a coast or the bombardment of a place. Floating bridge. (a) A bridge consisting of rafts or timber, with a floor of plank, supported wholly by the water; a bateau bridge. See Bateau. (b) (Mil.) A kind of double bridge, the upper one projecting beyond the lower one, and capable of being moved forward by pulleys; -- used for carrying troops over narrow moats in attacking the outworks of a fort. (c) A kind of ferryboat which is guided and impelled by means of chains which are anchored on each side of a stream, and pass over wheels on the vessel, the wheels being driven by stream power. (d) The landing platform of a ferry dock. Floating cartilage (Med.), a cartilage which moves freely in the cavity of a joint, and often interferes with the functions of the latter. Floating dam. (a) An anchored dam. (b) A caisson used as a gate for a dry dock. Floating derrick, a derrick on a float for river and harbor use, in raising vessels, moving stone for harbor improvements, etc. Floating dock. (Naut.) See under Dock. Floating harbor, a breakwater of cages or booms, anchored and fastened together, and used as a protection to ships riding at anchor to leeward. --Knight. Floating heart (Bot.), a small aquatic plant (Limnanthemum lacunosum) whose heart-shaped leaves float on the water of American ponds. Floating island, a dish for dessert, consisting of custard with floating masses of whipped cream or white of eggs. Floating kidney. (Med.) See Wandering kidney, under Wandering. Floating light, a light shown at the masthead of a vessel moored over sunken rocks, shoals, etc., to warn mariners of danger; a light-ship; also, a light erected on a buoy or floating stage. Floating liver. (Med.) See Wandering liver, under Wandering. Floating pier, a landing stage or pier which rises and falls with the tide. Floating ribs (Anat.), the lower or posterior ribs which are not connected with the others in front; in man they are the last two pairs. Floating screed (Plastering), a strip of plastering first laid on, to serve as a guide for the thickness of the coat. Floating threads (Weaving), threads which span several other threads without being interwoven with them, in a woven fabric.

Meaning of Ancho from wikipedia

- Puebla, Mexico. Dried, it is called ancho or chile ancho, from the Mexican Spanish name ancho ("wide") or chile ancho ("wide chile"). Stuffed fresh and...
- Vado Ancho (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈbaðo ˈantʃo]) is a muni****lity in the Honduran department of El Paraíso. Coordinates: 13°43′N 86°58′W / 13.717°N...
- "Río Ancho" is a Spanish flamenco guitar jazz piece that combines flamenco and gypsy jazz influences. The piece is in the key of E minor and progresses...
- Río Ancho may refer to: Río Ancho (song), a cl****ic flamenco track by Paco de Lucia Río Ancho, Cuba, village in Sancti Spíritus, Cuba Río Ancho, Colombia...
- used. Varieties of chili peppers used to make chili powder include Aleppo, ancho, cayenne, chipotle, chile de árbol, Cheongyang, jalapeño, Korean red, New...
- Paso Ancho is a corregimiento in Tierras Altas District, Chiriquí Province, Panama. It was established by Law 55 of September 13, 2013. Ley 55 del...
- Ancho is an unincorporated ghost town in Lincoln County, New Mexico, United States. Located west of the Lincoln National Forest 2 miles east of U.S....
- cinco centímetros de largo por un metro ochenta y nueve centímetros de ancho, en la cual irá dibujado el Escudo de Armas con todos sus blasones." (The...
- chocolate. What remained the same was the use of chili peppers, especially ancho, pasilla, mulato and chipotle, and the consistency of the sauce. The true...
- Rubén Peucelle (1933-2016) known as "el ancho", was an Argentine professional wrestler and bodybuilder. Rubén Peucelle was born in General Arenales...
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