Definition of Americana. Meaning of Americana. Synonyms of Americana

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Definition of Americana

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A Americana
Maguey Mag"uey, n. [Sp. maguey, Mexican maguei and metl.] (Bot.) The century plant, a species of Agave (A. Americana). See Agave.
A Americana
Widgeon Widg"eon, n. [Probably from an old French form of F. vigeon, vingeon, gingeon; of uncertain origin; cf. L. vipio, -onis, a kind of small crane.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of fresh-water ducks, especially those belonging to the subgenus Mareca, of the genus Anas. The common European widgeon (Anas penelope) and the American widgeon (A. Americana) are the most important species. The latter is called also baldhead, baldpate, baldface, baldcrown, smoking duck, wheat, duck, and whitebelly. Bald-faced, or Green-headed, widgeon, the American widgeon. Black widgeon, the European tufted duck. Gray widgeon. (a) The gadwall. (b) The pintail duck. Great headed widgeon, the poachard. Pied widgeon. (a) The poachard. (b) The goosander. Saw-billed widgeon, the merganser. Sea widgeon. See in the Vocabulary. Spear widgeon, the goosander. [Prov. Eng.] Spoonbilled widgeon, the shoveler. White widgeon, the smew. Wood widgeon, the wood duck.
A Americana
Agave A*ga"ve, n. [L. Agave, prop. name, fr. Gr. ?, fem. of ? illustrious, noble.] (bot.) A genus of plants (order Amaryllidace[ae]) of which the chief species is the maguey or century plant (A. Americana), wrongly called Aloe. It is from ten to seventy years, according to climate, in attaining maturity, when it produces a gigantic flower stem, sometimes forty feet in height, and perishes. The fermented juice is the pulque of the Mexicans; distilled, it yields mescal. A strong thread and a tough paper are made from the leaves, and the wood has many uses.
Agave Americana
Amole A*mo"le, n. [Mex.] (Bot.) Any detergent plant, or the part of it used as a detergent, as the roots of Agave Americana, Chlorogalum pomeridianum, etc. [Sp. Amer. & Mex.]
Agave Americana
Sisal grass Si*sal" grass`, Sisal hemp Si*sal" hemp`, The prepared fiber of the Agave Americana, or American aloe, used for cordage; -- so called from Sisal, a port in Yucatan. See Sisal hemp, under Hemp.
Agave Americana
Pita Pi"ta, n. [Sp.] (Bot.) (a) A fiber obtained from the Agave Americana and other related species, -- used for making cordage and paper. Called also pita fiber, and pita thread. (b) The plant which yields the fiber.
Agave Americana
Century Cen"tu*ry, n.; pl. Centuries. [L. centuria (in senses 1 & 3), fr. centum a hundred: cf. F. centurie. See Cent.] 1. A hundred; as, a century of sonnets; an aggregate of a hundred things. [Archaic.] And on it said a century of prayers. --Shak. 2. A period of a hundred years; as, this event took place over two centuries ago. Note: Century, in the reckoning of time, although often used in a general way of any series of hundred consecutive years (as, a century of temperance work), usually signifies a division of the Christian era, consisting of a period of one hundred years ending with the hundredth year from which it is named; as, the first century (a. d. 1-100 inclusive); the seventh century (a.d. 601-700); the eighteenth century (a.d. 1701-1800). With words or phrases connecting it with some other system of chronology it is used of similar division of those eras; as, the first century of Rome (A.U.C. 1-100). 3. (Rom. Antiq.) (a) A division of the Roman people formed according to their property, for the purpose of voting for civil officers. (b) One of sixty companies into which a legion of the army was divided. It was Commanded by a centurion. Century plant (Bot.), the Agave Americana, formerly supposed to flower but once in a century; -- hence the name. See Agave. The Magdeburg Centuries, an ecclesiastical history of the first thirteen centuries, arranged in thirteen volumes, compiled in the 16th century by Protestant scholars at Magdeburg.
Anas Americana
Baldpate Bald"pate`, n. 1. A baldheaded person. --Shak. 2. (Zo["o]l.) The American widgeon (Anas Americana).
Antilocapra Americana
Antelope An"te*lope, n. [OF. antelop, F. antilope, fro Gr. ?, ?, Eustathius, ``Hexa["e]m.,' p. 36, the origin of which is unknown.] (Zo["o]l.) One of a group of ruminant quadrupeds, intermediate between the deer and the goat. The horns are usually annulated, or ringed. There are many species in Africa and Asia. The antelope and wolf both fierce and fell. --Spenser. Note: The common or bezoar antelope of India is Antilope bezoartica. The chamois of the Alps, the gazelle, the addax, and the eland are other species. See Gazelle. The pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra Americana) is found in the Rocky Mountains. See Pronghorn.
Aythya Americana
Redhead Red"head` (-h?d`), n. 1. A person having red hair. 2. (Zo["o]l.) (a) An American duck (Aythya Americana) highly esteemed as a game bird. It is closely allied to the canvasback, but is smaller and its head brighter red. Called also red-headed duck. American poachard, grayback, and fall duck. See Illust. under Poachard. (b) The red-headed woodpecker. See Woodpecker. 3. (Bot.) A kind of milkweed (Asclepias Curassavica) with red flowers. It is used in medicine.
C Americana
Hornbeam Horn"beam`, n. [See Beam.] (Bot.) A tree of the genus Carpinus (C. Americana), having a smooth gray bark and a ridged trunk, the wood being white and very hard. It is common along the banks of streams in the United States, and is also called ironwood. The English hornbeam is C. Betulus. The American is called also blue beech and water beech. Hop hornbeam. (Bot.) See under Hop.
Cimbex Americana
Elm Elm, n. [AS. elm; akin to D. olm, OHG. elm, G. ulme, Icel. almr, Dan. & Sw. alm, L. ulmus, and E. alder. Cf. Old.] (Bot.) A tree of the genus Ulmus, of several species, much used as a shade tree, particularly in America. The English elm is Ulmus campestris; the common American or white elm is U. Americana; the slippery or red elm, U. fulva. Elm beetle (Zo["o]l.), one of several species of beetles (esp. Galeruca calmariensis), which feed on the leaves of the elm. Elm borer (Zo["o]l.), one of several species of beetles of which the larv[ae] bore into the wood or under the bark of the elm (esp. Saperda tridentata). Elm butterfly (Zo["o]l.), one of several species of butterflies, which, in the caterpillar state, feed on the leaves of the elm (esp. Vanessa antiopa and Grapta comma). See Comma butterfly, under Comma. Elm moth (Zo["o]l.), one of numerous species of moths of which the larv[ae] destroy the leaves of the elm (esp. Eugonia subsignaria, called elm spanworm). Elm sawfly (Zo["o]l.), a large sawfly (Cimbex Americana). The larva, which is white with a black dorsal stripe, feeds on the leaves of the elm.
Clisiocampa Americana
Tent Tent, n. [OE. tente, F. tente, LL. tenta, fr. L. tendere, tentum, to stretch. See Tend to move, and cf. Tent a roll of lint.] 1. A pavilion or portable lodge consisting of skins, canvas, or some strong cloth, stretched and sustained by poles, -- used for sheltering persons from the weather, especially soldiers in camp. Within his tent, large as is a barn. --Chaucer. 2. (Her.) The representation of a tent used as a bearing. Tent bed, a high-post bedstead curtained with a tentlike canopy. Tent caterpillar (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of gregarious caterpillars which construct on trees large silken webs into which they retreat when at rest. Some of the species are very destructive to fruit trees. The most common American species is the larva of a bombycid moth (Clisiocampa Americana). Called also lackery caterpillar, and webworm.
Conopholis Americana
Squawroot Squaw"root`, n. (Bot.) A scaly parasitic plant (Conopholis Americana) found in oak woods in the United States; -- called also cancer root.
Crus Americana
Whooping Whoop"ing, a. & n. from Whoop, v. t. Whooping cough (Med.), a violent, convulsive cough, returning at longer or shorter intervals, and consisting of several expirations, followed by a sonorous inspiration, or whoop; chin cough; hooping cough. --Dunglison. Whooping crane (Zo["o]l.), a North American crane (Crus Americana) noted for the loud, whooplike note which it utters.
Dianthera Americana
Water willow Wa"ter wil`low (Bot.) An American aquatic plant (Dianthera Americana) with long willowlike leaves, and spikes of small purplish flowers.
Epiphegus Americana
Beech Beech, n.; pl. Beeches. [OE. beche, AS. b?ce; akin to D. beuk, OHG. buocha, G. buche, Icel. beyki, Dan. b["o]g, Sw. bok, Russ. buk, L. fagus, Gr. ? oak, ? to eat, Skr. bhaksh; the tree being named originally from the esculent fruit. See Book, and cf. 7th Buck, Buckwheat.] (Bot.) A tree of the genus Fagus. Note: It grows to a large size, having a smooth bark and thick foliage, and bears an edible triangular nut, of which swine are fond. The Fagus sylvatica is the European species, and the F. ferruginea that of America. Beech drops (Bot.), a parasitic plant which grows on the roots of beeches (Epiphegus Americana). Beech marten (Zo["o]l.), the stone marten of Europe (Mustela foina). Beech mast, the nuts of the beech, esp. as they lie under the trees, in autumn. Beech oil, oil expressed from the mast or nuts of the beech tree. Cooper beech, a variety of the European beech with copper-colored, shining leaves.
F Americana
Ash Ash ([a^]sh), n. [OE. asch, esh, AS. [ae]sc; akin to OHG. asc, Sw. & Dan. ask, Icel. askr, D. esch, G. esche.] 1. (Bot.) A genus of trees of the Olive family, having opposite pinnate leaves, many of the species furnishing valuable timber, as the European ash (Fraxinus excelsior) and the white ash (F. Americana). Prickly ash (Zanthoxylum Americanum) and Poison ash (Rhus venenata) are shrubs of different families, somewhat resembling the true ashes in their foliage. Mountain ash. See Roman tree, and under Mountain. 2. The tough, elastic wood of the ash tree. Note: Ash is used adjectively, or as the first part of a compound term; as, ash bud, ash wood, ash tree, etc.
F Americana
Fraxinus Frax"i*nus, n. [L., the ash tree.] (Bot.) A genus of deciduous forest trees, found in the north temperate zone, and including the true ash trees. Note: Fraxinus excelsior is the European ash; F. Americana, the white ash; F. sambucifolia, the black ash or water ash.
F Americana
Coot Coot (k[=oo]t), n. [Cf. D. koet, W. cwtair; cwta short, bodtailed + iar hen; cf. cwtau to dock. Cf. Cut.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A wading bird with lobate toes, of the genus Fulica. The common European or bald coot is F. atra (see under bald); the American is F. Americana. (b) The surf duck or scoter. In the United States all the species of ([OE]demia are called coots. See Scoter. ``As simple as a coot.' --Halliwell. 2. A stupid fellow; a simpleton; as, a silly coot. [Colloq.]
Fulica Americana
Mud Mud, n. [Akin to LG. mudde, D. modder, G. moder mold, OSw. modd mud, Sw. modder mother, Dan. mudder mud. Cf. Mother a scum on liquors.] Earth and water mixed so as to be soft and adhesive. Mud bass (Zo["o]l.), a fresh-water fish (Acantharchum pomotis) of the Eastern United States. It produces a deep grunting note. Mud bath, an immersion of the body, or some part of it, in mud charged with medicinal agents, as a remedy for disease. Mud boat, a large flatboat used in deredging. Mud cat. See Catfish. Mud crab (Zo["o]l.), any one of several American marine crabs of the genus Panopeus. Mud dab (Zo["o]l.), the winter flounder. See Flounder, and Dab. Mud dauber (Zo["o]l.), a mud wasp. Mud devil (Zo["o]l.), the fellbender. Mud drum (Steam Boilers), a drum beneath a boiler, into which sediment and mud in the water can settle for removal. Mud eel (Zo["o]l.), a long, slender, aquatic amphibian (Siren lacertina), found in the Southern United States. It has persistent external gills and only the anterior pair of legs. See Siren. Mud frog (Zo["o]l.), a European frog (Pelobates fuscus). Mud hen. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The American coot (Fulica Americana). (b) The clapper rail. Mud lark, a person who cleans sewers, or delves in mud. [Slang] Mud minnow (Zo["o]l.), any small American fresh-water fish of the genus Umbra, as U. limi. The genus is allied to the pickerels. Mud plug, a plug for stopping the mudhole of a boiler. Mud puppy (Zo["o]l.), the menobranchus. Mud scow, a heavy scow, used in dredging; a mud boat. [U.S.] Mud turtle, Mud tortoise (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of fresh-water tortoises of the United States. Mud wasp (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of hymenopterous insects belonging to Pep[ae]us, and allied genera, which construct groups of mud cells, attached, side by side, to stones or to the woodwork of buildings, etc. The female places an egg in each cell, together with spiders or other insects, paralyzed by a sting, to serve as food for the larva. Called also mud dauber.
G Americana
Crane Crane (kr[=a]n), n. [AS. cran; akin to D. & LG. craan, G. kranich, krahn (this in sense 2), Gr. ge`ranos, L. grus, W. & Armor. garan, OSlav. zerav[i^], Lith. gerve, Icel. trani, Sw. trana, Dan. trane. [root]24. Cf. Geranium.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) A wading bird of the genus Grus, and allied genera, of various species, having a long, straight bill, and long legs and neck. Note: The common European crane is Grus cinerea. The sand-hill crane (G. Mexicana) and the whooping crane (G. Americana) are large American species. The Balearic or crowned crane is Balearica pavonina. The name is sometimes erroneously applied to the herons and cormorants. 2. A machine for raising and lowering heavy weights, and, while holding them suspended, transporting them through a limited lateral distance. In one form it consists of a projecting arm or jib of timber or iron, a rotating post or base, and the necessary tackle, windlass, etc.; -- so called from a fancied similarity between its arm and the neck of a crane See Illust. of Derrick. 3. An iron arm with horizontal motion, attached to the side or back of a fireplace, for supporting kettles, etc., over a fire. 4. A siphon, or bent pipe, for drawing liquors out of a cask. 5. (Naut.) A forked post or projecting bracket to support spars, etc., -- generally used in pairs. See Crotch, 2. Crane fly (Zo["o]l.), a dipterous insect with long legs, of the genus Tipula. Derrick crane. See Derrick. Gigantic crane. (Zo["o]l.) See Adjutant, n., 3. Traveling crane, Traveler crane, Traversing crane (Mach.), a crane mounted on wheels; esp., an overhead crane consisting of a crab or other hoisting apparatus traveling on rails or beams fixed overhead, as in a machine shop or foundry. Water crane, a kind of hydrant with a long swinging spout, for filling locomotive tenders, water carts, etc., with water.
Gastropacha Americana
Lappet Lap"pet, n. [Dim. of lap a fold.] A small decorative fold or flap, esp, of lace or muslin, in a garment or headdress. --Swift. Lappet moth (Zo["o]l.), one of several species of bombycid moths, which have stout, hairy caterpillars, flat beneath. Two common American species (Gastropacha Americana, and Tolype velleda) feed upon the apple tree.
Genipa Americana
Genipap Gen"i*pap, n. (Bot.) The edible fruit of a West Indian tree (Genipa Americana) of the order Rubiace[ae]. It is oval in shape, as a large as a small orange, of a pale greenish color, and with dark purple juice.
Heuchera Americana
Alum root Al"um root` (Bot.) A North American herb (Heuchera Americana) of the Saxifrage family, whose root has astringent properties.
L Americana
Larch Larch, n. [Cf. OE. larege (Cotgrave), It. larice, Sp. larice, alerce, G. l["a]rche; all fr. L. larix, -icis, Gr. (?).] (Bot.) A genus of coniferous trees, having deciduous leaves, in fascicles (see Illust. of Fascicle). Note: The European larch is Larix Europ[ae]a. The American or black larch is L. Americana, the hackmatack or tamarack. The trees are generally of a drooping, graceful appearance.
Larix Americana
Hackmatack Hack"ma*tack`, n. [Of American Indian origin.] (Bot.) The American larch (Larix Americana), a coniferous tree with slender deciduous leaves; also, its heavy, close-grained timber. Called also tamarack.
M Americana
Mammee Mam*mee", n. [Haytian mamey.] (Bot.) A fruit tree of tropical America, belonging to the genus Mammea (M. Americana); also, its fruit. The latter is large, covered with a thick, tough ring, and contains a bright yellow pulp of a pleasant taste and fragrant scent. It is often called mammee apple.
M Americana
Marten Mar"ten, n. [From older martern, marter, martre, F. martre, marte, LL. martures (pl.), fr. L. martes; akin to AS. mear?, meard, G. marder, OHG. mardar, Icel. m["o]r?r. Cf. Foumart.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several fur-bearing carnivores of the genus Mustela, closely allied to the sable. Among the more important species are the European beech, or stone, marten (Mustela foina); the pine marten (M. martes); and the American marten, or sable (M. Americana), which some zo["o]logists consider only a variety of the Russian sable. 2. The fur of the marten, used for hats, muffs, etc.
O Americana
Scoter Sco"ter, n. [Cf. Prov. E. scote to plow up.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of northern sea ducks of the genus Oidemia. Note: The European scoters are Oidemia nigra, called also black duck, black diver, surf duck; and the velvet, or double, scoter (O. fusca). The common American species are the velvet, or white-winged, scoter (O. Deglandi), called also velvet duck, white-wing, bull coot, white-winged coot; the black scoter (O. Americana), called also black coot, butterbill, coppernose; and the surf scoter, or surf duck (O. perspicillata), called also baldpate, skunkhead, horsehead, patchhead, pishaug, and spectacled coot. These birds are collectively called also coots. The females and young are called gray coots, and brown coots.

Meaning of Americana from wikipedia

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- Agave americana, common names sentry plant, century plant, maguey or American aloe, is a species of flowering plant in the family Asparagaceae, native...
- Pax Americana (Latin for "American Peace", modeled after Pax Romana, Pax Britannica, and Pax Mongolica) is a term applied to the concept of relative peace...
- Americana Group is the largest integrated food company in Middle East. In 1970, Americana first opened Wimpy in Kuwait. During the 1970s, Americana Meat...
- Americana is the fifth studio album by American punk rock band the Offspring, released on November 17, 1998 by Columbia Records. Following a worldwide...
- The American marten or American pine marten (Martes americana) is a species of North American mammal, a member of the family Mustelidae. The species is...
- Encyclopedia Americana is one of the largest general encyclopedias in the English language. Following the acquisition of Grolier in 2000, the encyclopedia...
- The whooping crane (Grus americana), the tallest North American bird, is an endangered crane species named for its whooping sound. Along with the sandhill...
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