Definition of American Braille. Meaning of American Braille. Synonyms of American Braille

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word American Braille. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word American Braille and, of course, American Braille synonyms and on the right images related to the word American Braille.

Definition of American Braille

American Braille
Point Point, n. 1. (Med.) A pointed piece of quill or bone covered at one end with vaccine matter; -- called also vaccine point. 2. One of the raised dots used in certain systems of printing and writing for the blind. The first practical system was that devised by Louis Braille in 1829, and still used in Europe (see Braille). Two modifications of this are current in the United States: New York point founded on three bases of equidistant points arranged in two lines (viz., : :: :::), and a later improvement, American Braille, embodying the Braille base (:::) and the New-York-point principle of using the characters of few points for the commonest letters. 3. In technical senses: (a) In various games, a position of a certain player, or, by extension, the player himself; as: (1) (Lacrosse & Ice Hockey) The position of the player of each side who stands a short distance in front of the goal keeper; also, the player himself. (2) (Baseball) (pl.) The position of the pitcher and catcher. (b) (Hunting) A spot to which a straight run is made; hence, a straight run from point to point; a cross-country run. [Colloq. Oxf. E. D.] (c) (Falconry) The perpendicular rising of a hawk over the place where its prey has gone into cover. (d) Act of pointing, as of the foot downward in certain dance positions.

Meaning of American Braille from wikipedia

- embossed paper. Braille users can read computer screens and other electronic supports using refreshable braille displays. They can write braille with the original...
- American Braille was a po****r braille alphabet used in the United States before the adoption of standardized English braille in 1918. It was the alphabet...
- Louis Braille (/breɪl/ (listen); French: [lwi bʁaj]; 4 January 1809 – 6 January 1852) was a French educator and inventor of a system of reading and writing...
- English Braille, also known as Grade 2 Braille, is the braille alphabet used for English. It consists of 250 or so letters (phonograms), numerals, punctuation...
- The goal of braille uniformity is to unify the braille alphabets of the world as much as possible, so that literacy in one braille alphabet readily transfers...
- Braille ASCII (or more formally The North American Braille ASCII Code, also known as SimBraille) is a subset of the ASCII character set which uses 64...
- The Braille Institute of America (BIA) is a non-profit organization with headquarters in Los Angeles providing programs, seminars and one-on-one instruction...
- and American Braille over English Braille. Wait advocated the New York System as more logical than either the American Braille or the English Braille alphabets...
- A refreshable braille display or braille terminal is an electro-mechanical device for displaying braille characters, usually by means of round-tipped pins...
- Unified English Braille Code (UEBC, formerly UBC, now usually simply UEB) is an English language Braille code standard, developed to permit representing...
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