Definition of Allotropes. Meaning of Allotropes. Synonyms of Allotropes

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Definition of Allotropes

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Meaning of Allotropes from wikipedia

- more different forms, in the same physical state, known as allotropes of the elements. Allotropes are different structural modifications of an element; the...
- exists as many allotropes. In terms of large number of allotropes, sulfur is second only to carbon. In addition to the allotropes, each allotrope often exists...
- 3-periodic allotropes of carbon are known at the present time, according to the Samara Carbon Allotrope Database (SACADA). Diamond is a well known allotrope of...
- phosphorus can exist in several allotropes, the most common of which are white and red solids. Solid violet and black allotropes are also known. Gaseous phosphorus...
- experiments are being conducted on high-pressure and Superdense carbon allotropes. The melting point of iron is experimentally well defined for pressures...
- There are several known allotropes of oxygen. The most familiar is molecular oxygen (O2), present at significant levels in Earth's atmosphere and also...
- monoclinic red allotropes and two amorphous allotropes, one of which is red and one of which is black. The red allotrope converts to the red allotrope in the...
- bond together in diverse ways, resulting in various allotropes of carbon. The best known allotropes are graphite, diamond, and buckminsterfullerene. The...
- phosphorus (P4). Allotropes are different chemical forms of the same element (not containing any other element). In that sense, allotropes are all homonuclear...
- because of refractory contamination by carbon or other elements. Several allotropes of boron exist: amorphous boron is a brown powder; crystalline boron is...
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