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Anno Domini
Anno Domini An"no Dom"i*ni [L., in the year of [our] Lord [Jesus Christ]; usually abbrev. a. d.] In the year of the Christian era; as, a. d. 1887.
Gallus domesticus
Fowl Fowl, n. Note: Instead of the pl. Fowls the singular is often used collectively. [OE. foul, fowel, foghel, fuhel, fugel, AS. fugol; akin to OS. fugal D. & G. vogel, OHG. fogal, Icel. & Dan. fugl, Sw. fogel, f[*a]gel, Goth. fugls; of unknown origin, possibly by loss of l, from the root of E. fly, or akin to E. fox, as being a tailed animal.] 1. Any bird; esp., any large edible bird. Let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air. --Gen. i. 26. Behold the fowls of the air; for they sow not. --Matt. vi. 26. Like a flight of fowl Scattered by winds and high tempestuous gusts. --Shak. 2. Any domesticated bird used as food, as a hen, turkey, duck; in a more restricted sense, the common domestic cock or hen (Gallus domesticus). Barndoor fowl, or Barnyard fowl, a fowl that frequents the barnyard; the common domestic cock or hen.
Gryllus domesticus
--Simonds. House car (Railroad), a freight car with inclosing sides and a roof; a box car. House of correction. See Correction. House cricket (Zo["o]l.), a European cricket (Gryllus domesticus), which frequently lives in houses, between the bricks of chimneys and fireplaces. It is noted for the loud chirping or stridulation of the males. House dog, a dog kept in or about a dwelling house. House finch (Zo["o]l.), the burion. House flag, a flag denoting the commercial house to which a merchant vessel belongs. House fly (Zo["o]l.), a common fly (esp. Musca domestica), which infests houses both in Europe and America. Its larva is a maggot which lives in decaying substances or excrement, about sink drains, etc. House of God, a temple or church. House of ill fame. See Ill fame under Ill, a. House martin (Zo["o]l.), a common European swallow (Hirundo urbica). It has feathered feet, and builds its nests of mud against the walls of buildings. Called also house swallow, and window martin. House mouse (Zo["o]l.), the common mouse (Mus musculus). House physician, the resident medical adviser of a hospital or other public institution. House snake (Zo["o]l.), the milk snake. House sparrow (Zo["o]l.), the common European sparrow (Passer domesticus). It has recently been introduced into America, where it has become very abundant, esp. in cities. Called also thatch sparrow. House spider (Zo["o]l.), any spider which habitually lives in houses. Among the most common species are Theridium tepidariorum and Tegenaria domestica. House surgeon, the resident surgeon of a hospital. House wren (Zo["o]l.), the common wren of the Eastern United States (Troglodytes a["e]don). It is common about houses and in gardens, and is noted for its vivacity, and loud musical notes. See Wren. Religious house, a monastery or convent. The White House, the official residence of the President of the United States; -- hence, colloquially, the office of President.
Gryllus domesticus
Cricket Crick"et (kr?k"?t), n. [OE. criket, OF. crequet, criquet; prob. of German origin, and akin to E. creak; cf. D. kriek a cricket. See Creak.] (Zo["o]l.) An orthopterous insect of the genus Gryllus, and allied genera. The males make chirping, musical notes by rubbing together the basal parts of the veins of the front wings. Note: The common European cricket is Gryllus domesticus; the common large black crickets of America are G. niger, G. neglectus, and others. Balm cricket. See under Balm. Cricket bird, a small European bird (Silvia locustella); -- called also grasshopper warbler. Cricket frog, a small American tree frog (Acris gryllus); -- so called from its chirping.
Lansium domesticum
Lanseh Lan"seh, n. The small, whitish brown fruit of an East Indian tree (Lansium domesticum). It has a fleshy pulp, with an agreeable subacid taste. --Balfour.
Musca domestica
--Simonds. House car (Railroad), a freight car with inclosing sides and a roof; a box car. House of correction. See Correction. House cricket (Zo["o]l.), a European cricket (Gryllus domesticus), which frequently lives in houses, between the bricks of chimneys and fireplaces. It is noted for the loud chirping or stridulation of the males. House dog, a dog kept in or about a dwelling house. House finch (Zo["o]l.), the burion. House flag, a flag denoting the commercial house to which a merchant vessel belongs. House fly (Zo["o]l.), a common fly (esp. Musca domestica), which infests houses both in Europe and America. Its larva is a maggot which lives in decaying substances or excrement, about sink drains, etc. House of God, a temple or church. House of ill fame. See Ill fame under Ill, a. House martin (Zo["o]l.), a common European swallow (Hirundo urbica). It has feathered feet, and builds its nests of mud against the walls of buildings. Called also house swallow, and window martin. House mouse (Zo["o]l.), the common mouse (Mus musculus). House physician, the resident medical adviser of a hospital or other public institution. House snake (Zo["o]l.), the milk snake. House sparrow (Zo["o]l.), the common European sparrow (Passer domesticus). It has recently been introduced into America, where it has become very abundant, esp. in cities. Called also thatch sparrow. House spider (Zo["o]l.), any spider which habitually lives in houses. Among the most common species are Theridium tepidariorum and Tegenaria domestica. House surgeon, the resident surgeon of a hospital. House wren (Zo["o]l.), the common wren of the Eastern United States (Troglodytes a["e]don). It is common about houses and in gardens, and is noted for its vivacity, and loud musical notes. See Wren. Religious house, a monastery or convent. The White House, the official residence of the President of the United States; -- hence, colloquially, the office of President.
Old Dominion
Old Dominion Old Dominion Virginia; -- a name of uncertain origin, perh. from the old designation of the colony as ``the Colony and Dominion of Virginia.'
P domestica
Prune Prune, n. [F. prune, from L. prunum a plum. See Plum.] A plum; esp., a dried plum, used in cookery; as, French or Turkish prunes; California prunes. German prune (Bot.), a large dark purple plum, of oval shape, often one-sided. It is much used for preserving, either dried or in sirup. Prune tree. (Bot.) (a) A tree of the genus Prunus (P. domestica), which produces prunes. (b) The West Indian tree, Prunus occidentalis. South African prune (Bot.), the edible fruit of a sapindaceous tree (Pappea Capensis).
Passer domesticus
Sparrow Spar"row, n. [OE. sparwe, AS. spearwa; akin to OHG. sparo, G. sperling, Icel. sp["o]rr, Dan. spurv, spurre, Sw. sparf, Goth. sparwa; -- originally, probably, the quiverer or flutterer, and akin to E. spurn. See Spurn, and cf. Spavin.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) One of many species of small singing birds of the family Fringillig[ae], having conical bills, and feeding chiefly on seeds. Many sparrows are called also finches, and buntings. The common sparrow, or house sparrow, of Europe (Passer domesticus) is noted for its familiarity, its voracity, its attachment to its young, and its fecundity. See House sparrow, under House. Note: The following American species are well known; the chipping sparrow, or chippy, the sage sparrow, the savanna sparrow, the song sparrow, the tree sparrow, and the white-throated sparrow (see Peabody bird). See these terms under Sage, Savanna, etc. 2. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several small singing birds somewhat resembling the true sparrows in form or habits, as the European hedge sparrow. See under Hedge. He that doth the ravens feed, Yea, providently caters for the sparrow, Be comfort to my age! --Shak. Field sparrow, Fox sparrow, etc. See under Field, Fox, etc. Sparrow bill, a small nail; a castiron shoe nail; a sparable. Sparrow hawk. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small European hawk (Accipiter nisus) or any of the allied species. (b) A small American falcon (Falco sparverius). (c) The Australian collared sparrow hawk (Accipiter torquatus). Note: The name is applied to other small hawks, as the European kestrel and the New Zealand quail hawk. Sparrow owl (Zo["o]l.), a small owl (Glaucidium passerinum) found both in the Old World and the New. The name is also applied to other species of small owls. Sparrow spear (Zo["o]l.), the female of the reed bunting. [Prov. Eng.]
Passer domesticus
--Simonds. House car (Railroad), a freight car with inclosing sides and a roof; a box car. House of correction. See Correction. House cricket (Zo["o]l.), a European cricket (Gryllus domesticus), which frequently lives in houses, between the bricks of chimneys and fireplaces. It is noted for the loud chirping or stridulation of the males. House dog, a dog kept in or about a dwelling house. House finch (Zo["o]l.), the burion. House flag, a flag denoting the commercial house to which a merchant vessel belongs. House fly (Zo["o]l.), a common fly (esp. Musca domestica), which infests houses both in Europe and America. Its larva is a maggot which lives in decaying substances or excrement, about sink drains, etc. House of God, a temple or church. House of ill fame. See Ill fame under Ill, a. House martin (Zo["o]l.), a common European swallow (Hirundo urbica). It has feathered feet, and builds its nests of mud against the walls of buildings. Called also house swallow, and window martin. House mouse (Zo["o]l.), the common mouse (Mus musculus). House physician, the resident medical adviser of a hospital or other public institution. House snake (Zo["o]l.), the milk snake. House sparrow (Zo["o]l.), the common European sparrow (Passer domesticus). It has recently been introduced into America, where it has become very abundant, esp. in cities. Called also thatch sparrow. House spider (Zo["o]l.), any spider which habitually lives in houses. Among the most common species are Theridium tepidariorum and Tegenaria domestica. House surgeon, the resident surgeon of a hospital. House wren (Zo["o]l.), the common wren of the Eastern United States (Troglodytes a["e]don). It is common about houses and in gardens, and is noted for its vivacity, and loud musical notes. See Wren. Religious house, a monastery or convent. The White House, the official residence of the President of the United States; -- hence, colloquially, the office of President.
Prunus domestica
Plum Plum, n. [AS. pl[=u]me, fr. L. prunum; akin to Gr. ?, ?. Cf. Prune a dried plum.] 1. (Bot.) The edible drupaceous fruit of the Prunus domestica, and of several other species of Prunus; also, the tree itself, usually called plum tree. The bullace, the damson, and the numerous varieties of plum, of our gardens, although growing into thornless trees, are believed to be varieties of the blackthorn, produced by long cultivation. --G. Bentham.
Prunus domestica
Note: Two or three hundred varieties of plums derived from the Prunus domestica are described; among them the greengage, the Orleans, the purple gage, or Reine Claude Violette, and the German prune, are some of the best known. Note: Among the true plums are; Beach plum, the Prunus maritima, and its crimson or purple globular drupes, Bullace plum. See Bullace. Chickasaw plum, the American Prunus Chicasa, and its round red drupes. Orleans plum, a dark reddish purple plum of medium size, much grown in England for sale in the markets. Wild plum of America, Prunus Americana, with red or yellow fruit, the original of the Iowa plum and several other varieties. Among plants called plum, but of other genera than Prunus, are; Australian plum, Cargillia arborea and C. australis, of the same family with the persimmon. Blood plum, the West African H[ae]matostaphes Barteri. Cocoa plum, the Spanish nectarine. See under Nectarine. Date plum. See under Date. Gingerbread plum, the West African Parinarium macrophyllum. Gopher plum, the Ogeechee lime. Gray plum, Guinea plum. See under Guinea. Indian plum, several species of Flacourtia. 2. A grape dried in the sun; a raisin. 3. A handsome fortune or property; formerly, in cant language, the sum of [pounds]100,000 sterling; also, the person possessing it. Plum bird, Plum budder (Zo["o]l.), the European bullfinch. Plum gouger (Zo["o]l.), a weevil, or curculio (Coccotorus scutellaris), which destroys plums. It makes round holes in the pulp, for the reception of its eggs. The larva bores into the stone and eats the kernel. Plum weevil (Zo["o]l.), an American weevil which is very destructive to plums, nectarines cherries, and many other stone fruits. It lays its eggs in crescent-shaped incisions made with its jaws. The larva lives upon the pulp around the stone. Called also turk, and plum curculio. See Illust. under Curculio.
Public domain
Domain Do*main", n. [F. domaine, OF. demaine, L. dominium, property, right of ownership, fr. dominus master, owner. See Dame, and cf Demesne, Dungeon.] 1. Dominion; empire; authority. 2. The territory over which dominion or authority is exerted; the possessions of a sovereign or commonwealth, or the like. Also used figuratively. The domain of authentic history. --E. Everett. The domain over which the poetic spirit ranges. --J. C. Shairp. 3. Landed property; estate; especially, the land about the mansion house of a lord, and in his immediate occupancy; demesne. --Shenstone. 4. (Law) Ownership of land; an estate or patrimony which one has in his own right; absolute proprietorship; paramount or sovereign ownership. Public domain, the territory belonging to a State or to the general government; public lands. [U.S.]
Pyrus domestica
Service Serv"ice, n., or Service Serv"ice [Properly, the tree which bears serve, OE. serves, pl., service berries, AS. syrfe service tree; akin to L. sorbus.] (Bot.) A name given to several trees and shrubs of the genus Pyrus, as Pyrus domestica and P. torminalis of Europe, the various species of mountain ash or rowan tree, and the American shad bush (see Shad bush, under Shad). They have clusters of small, edible, applelike berries. Service berry (Bot.), the fruit of any kind of service tree. In British America the name is especially applied to that of the several species or varieties of the shad bush (Amelanchier.)
Right of eminent domain
Right of eminent domain, that superior dominion of the sovereign power over all the property within the state, including that previously granted by itself, which authorizes it to appropriate any part thereof to a necessary public use, reasonable compensation being made.
Right of eminent domain
Right of eminent domain. (Law) See under Domain. Syn: Lofty; elevated; exalted; conspicuous; prominent; remarkable; distinguished; illustrious; famous; celebrated; renowned; well-known. See Distinguished.
Tegenaria domestica
--Simonds. House car (Railroad), a freight car with inclosing sides and a roof; a box car. House of correction. See Correction. House cricket (Zo["o]l.), a European cricket (Gryllus domesticus), which frequently lives in houses, between the bricks of chimneys and fireplaces. It is noted for the loud chirping or stridulation of the males. House dog, a dog kept in or about a dwelling house. House finch (Zo["o]l.), the burion. House flag, a flag denoting the commercial house to which a merchant vessel belongs. House fly (Zo["o]l.), a common fly (esp. Musca domestica), which infests houses both in Europe and America. Its larva is a maggot which lives in decaying substances or excrement, about sink drains, etc. House of God, a temple or church. House of ill fame. See Ill fame under Ill, a. House martin (Zo["o]l.), a common European swallow (Hirundo urbica). It has feathered feet, and builds its nests of mud against the walls of buildings. Called also house swallow, and window martin. House mouse (Zo["o]l.), the common mouse (Mus musculus). House physician, the resident medical adviser of a hospital or other public institution. House snake (Zo["o]l.), the milk snake. House sparrow (Zo["o]l.), the common European sparrow (Passer domesticus). It has recently been introduced into America, where it has become very abundant, esp. in cities. Called also thatch sparrow. House spider (Zo["o]l.), any spider which habitually lives in houses. Among the most common species are Theridium tepidariorum and Tegenaria domestica. House surgeon, the resident surgeon of a hospital. House wren (Zo["o]l.), the common wren of the Eastern United States (Troglodytes a["e]don). It is common about houses and in gardens, and is noted for its vivacity, and loud musical notes. See Wren. Religious house, a monastery or convent. The White House, the official residence of the President of the United States; -- hence, colloquially, the office of President.
Whispering dome
Whispering Whis"per*ing, a. & n. from Whisper. v. t. Whispering gallery, or Whispering dome, one of such a form that sounds produced in certain parts of it are concentrated by reflection from the walls to another part, so that whispers or feeble sounds are audible at a much greater distance than under ordinary circumstances.

Meaning of dom from wikipedia

- Dom or DOM may refer to: Dom (film), a 1958 Polish film DOM (album), a 2012 album by German singer Joachim Witt Differential object marking, a linguistic...
- Dom Pérignon (/ˌdɒmpɛrɪnˈjɒn/; French pronunciation: ​[dɔ̃ peʁiɲɔ̃]) is a brand of vintage Champagne produced by the Champagne house Moët & Chandon and...
- The Do****ent Object Model (DOM) is a cross-platform and language-independent application programming interface that treats an HTML, XHTML, or XML do****ent...
- Dom Dom is a ****anese fast food restaurant chain operated by Orange Food Court, Inc. Dom Dom was the first hamburger chain to open in ****an, with the first...
- DOMS or doms or variant, may refer to: Doms, a Bengai Hindu caste Dela**** onset muscle soreness (DOMS) Department of Management Studies (DoMS) DoMS, Indian...
- ISBN 078644259X. Biography portal Dom DeLuise on IMDb Dom DeLuise at the TCM Movie Database Dom DeLuise at the Internet Broadway Database Dom DeLuise at Find a Grave...
- Doms are a Bengali Hindu caste found in large numbers in Birbhum, Bankura and other districts in the western fringe of the Indian state of West Bengal...
- Dom Hemingway is a 2013 British black comedy–crime drama film directed and written by Richard Shepard, and starring Jude Law, Richard E. Grant, Demián...
- Dom Pierre Pérignon, O.S.B., (December 1638 – 14 September 1715) was a French Benedictine monk who made important contributions to the production and...
- The Dom (also called "Domi"; Arabic: دومي‎ / ALA-LC: Dūmī , دومري / Dūmrī , Ḍom / ضوم or دوم, or sometimes also called "Doms") are a people with origins...
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