Definition of Dame. Meaning of Dame. Synonyms of Dame

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Dame. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Dame and, of course, Dame synonyms and on the right images related to the word Dame.

Definition of Dame

No result for Dame. Showing similar results...

Beldame
Beldam Bel"dam Beldame Bel"dame, n. [Pref. bel-, denoting relationship + dame mother: cf. F. belledame fair lady, It. belladonna. See Belle, and Dame.] 1. Grandmother; -- corresponding to belsire. To show the beldam daughters of her daughter. --Shak. 2. An old woman in general; especially, an ugly old woman; a hag. Around the beldam all erect they hang. --Akenside.
Fundament
Fundament Fun"da*ment, n. [OE. fundament, fundement, fondement, OF. fundement, fondement, F. fondement, fr. L. fundamentum foundation, fr. fundare to lay the bottom, to found, fr. fundus bottom. See Fund.] 1. Foundation. [Obs.] --Chaucer. 2. The part of the body on which one sits; the buttocks; specifically (Anat.), the anus. --Hume.
Fundamental
Fundamental Fun`da*men"tal, a. [Cf. F. fondamental.] Pertaining to the foundation or basis; serving for the foundation. Hence: Essential, as an element, principle, or law; important; original; elementary; as, a fundamental truth; a fundamental axiom. The fundamental reasons of this war. --Shak. Some fundamental antithesis in nature. --Whewell. Fundamental bass (Mus.), the root note of a chord; a bass formed of the roots or fundamental tones of the chords. Fundamental chord (Mus.), a chord, the lowest tone of which is its root. Fundamental colors, red, green, and violet-blue. See Primary colors, under Color.
Fundamental
Fundamental Fun"da*men`tal, n. A leading or primary principle, rule, law, or article, which serves as the groundwork of a system; essential part, as, the fundamentals of the Christian faith.
Fundamental bass
Fundamental Fun`da*men"tal, a. [Cf. F. fondamental.] Pertaining to the foundation or basis; serving for the foundation. Hence: Essential, as an element, principle, or law; important; original; elementary; as, a fundamental truth; a fundamental axiom. The fundamental reasons of this war. --Shak. Some fundamental antithesis in nature. --Whewell. Fundamental bass (Mus.), the root note of a chord; a bass formed of the roots or fundamental tones of the chords. Fundamental chord (Mus.), a chord, the lowest tone of which is its root. Fundamental colors, red, green, and violet-blue. See Primary colors, under Color.
Fundamental chord
Fundamental Fun`da*men"tal, a. [Cf. F. fondamental.] Pertaining to the foundation or basis; serving for the foundation. Hence: Essential, as an element, principle, or law; important; original; elementary; as, a fundamental truth; a fundamental axiom. The fundamental reasons of this war. --Shak. Some fundamental antithesis in nature. --Whewell. Fundamental bass (Mus.), the root note of a chord; a bass formed of the roots or fundamental tones of the chords. Fundamental chord (Mus.), a chord, the lowest tone of which is its root. Fundamental colors, red, green, and violet-blue. See Primary colors, under Color.
Fundamental colors
Fundamental Fun`da*men"tal, a. [Cf. F. fondamental.] Pertaining to the foundation or basis; serving for the foundation. Hence: Essential, as an element, principle, or law; important; original; elementary; as, a fundamental truth; a fundamental axiom. The fundamental reasons of this war. --Shak. Some fundamental antithesis in nature. --Whewell. Fundamental bass (Mus.), the root note of a chord; a bass formed of the roots or fundamental tones of the chords. Fundamental chord (Mus.), a chord, the lowest tone of which is its root. Fundamental colors, red, green, and violet-blue. See Primary colors, under Color.
fundamental colors
Color Col"or, n. [Written also colour.] [OF. color, colur, colour, F. couleur, L. color; prob. akin to celare to conceal (the color taken as that which covers). See Helmet.] 1. A property depending on the relations of light to the eye, by which individual and specific differences in the hues and tints of objects are apprehended in vision; as, gay colors; sad colors, etc. Note: The sensation of color depends upon a peculiar function of the retina or optic nerve, in consequence of which rays of light produce different effects according to the length of their waves or undulations, waves of a certain length producing the sensation of red, shorter waves green, and those still shorter blue, etc. White, or ordinary, light consists of waves of various lengths so blended as to produce no effect of color, and the color of objects depends upon their power to absorb or reflect a greater or less proportion of the rays which fall upon them. 2. Any hue distinguished from white or black. 3. The hue or color characteristic of good health and spirits; ruddy complexion. Give color to my pale cheek. --Shak. 4. That which is used to give color; a paint; a pigment; as, oil colors or water colors. 5. That which covers or hides the real character of anything; semblance; excuse; disguise; appearance. They had let down the boat into the sea, under color as though they would have cast anchors out of the foreship. --Acts xxvii. 30. That he should die is worthy policy; But yet we want a color for his death. --Shak. 6. Shade or variety of character; kind; species. Boys and women are for the most part cattle of this color. --Shak. 7. A distinguishing badge, as a flag or similar symbol (usually in the plural); as, the colors or color of a ship or regiment; the colors of a race horse (that is, of the cap and jacket worn by the jockey). In the United States each regiment of infantry and artillery has two colors, one national and one regimental. --Farrow. 8. (Law) An apparent right; as where the defendant in trespass gave to the plaintiff an appearance of title, by stating his title specially, thus removing the cause from the jury to the court. --Blackstone. Note: Color is express when it is averred in the pleading, and implied when it is implied in the pleading. Body color. See under Body. Color blindness, total or partial inability to distinguish or recognize colors. See Daltonism. Complementary color, one of two colors so related to each other that when blended together they produce white light; -- so called because each color makes up to the other what it lacks to make it white. Artificial or pigment colors, when mixed, produce effects differing from those of the primary colors, in consequence of partial absorption. Of color (as persons, races, etc.), not of the white race; -- commonly meaning, esp. in the United States, of negro blood, pure or mixed. Primary colors, those developed from the solar beam by the prism, viz., red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet, which are reduced by some authors to three, -- red, green, and violet-blue. These three are sometimes called fundamental colors. Subjective or Accidental color, a false or spurious color seen in some instances, owing to the persistence of the luminous impression upon the retina, and a gradual change of its character, as where a wheel perfectly white, and with a circumference regularly subdivided, is made to revolve rapidly over a dark object, the teeth of the wheel appear to the eye of different shades of color varying with the rapidity of rotation. See Accidental colors, under Accidental.
Fundamentally
Fundamentally Fun`da*men"tal*ly, adv. Primarily; originally; essentially; radically; at the foundation; in origin or constituents. ``Fundamentally defective.' --Burke.
Hippodame
Hippodame Hip"po*dame, n. [Cf. F. hippopotame.] A fabulous sea monster. [Obs.] --Spenser.
Madame
Madame Ma`dame", n.; pl. Mesdames. [F., fr. ma my (L. mea) + dame dame. See Dame, and cf. Madonna.] My lady; -- a French title formerly given to ladies of quality; now, in France, given to all married women. --Chaucer.
Mesdames
Mesdames Mes`dames" (F. ?, E. ?), n., pl. of Madame and Madam.
Mesdames
Madam Mad"am, n.; pl. Madams, or Mesdames. [See Madame.] A gentlewoman; -- an appellation or courteous form of address given to a lady, especially an elderly or a married lady; -- much used in the address, at the beginning of a letter, to a woman. The corresponding word in addressing a man is Sir.
Mesdames
Madame Ma`dame", n.; pl. Mesdames. [F., fr. ma my (L. mea) + dame dame. See Dame, and cf. Madonna.] My lady; -- a French title formerly given to ladies of quality; now, in France, given to all married women. --Chaucer.
Nidamental
Nidamental Nid`a*men"tal, a. [L. nidamentum materials for a nest, fr. nidus nest. See Nest.] (Zo["o]l.) Of, pertaining to, or baring, eggs or egg capsules; as, the nidament capsules of certain gastropods; nidamental glands. See Illust. of Dibranchiata.
Paludament
Paludament Pa*lu"da*ment, n. See Paludamentum.
Paludamentum
Paludamentum Pa*lu`da*men*tum, n.; pl. Paladumenta. (Rom. Antiq.) A military cloak worn by a general and his principal officers.
Schooldame
Schooldame School"dame` n. A schoolmistress.
Stepdame
Stepdame Step"dame`, n. A stepmother. --Spenser.
Sudamen
Sudamina Su*dam"i*na, n. pl, sing. Sudamen. [NL. sudamen, -inis, fr. sudare to sweat. See Sweat.] (Med.) Minute vesicles surrounded by an area of reddened skin, produced by excessive sweating.
Trollmydames
Trollmydames Troll"my*dames`, n. [F. trou-madame pigeon holes.] The game of nineholes. [Written also trolmydames.] [Obs.] --Shak.
trolmydames
Trollmydames Troll"my*dames`, n. [F. trou-madame pigeon holes.] The game of nineholes. [Written also trolmydames.] [Obs.] --Shak.
Vidame
Vidame Vi*dame", n. [F., fr. LL. vice-dominus, fr. L. vice instead of + dominus master, lord.] (Fr. Feud. Law) One of a class of temporal officers who originally represented the bishops, but later erected their offices into fiefs, and became feudal nobles.

Meaning of Dame from wikipedia

- Dame is an honorific title and the feminine form of address for the honour of damehood in many Christian chivalric orders, as well as the British honours...
- precedence: Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (GBE) Knight Commander or Dame Commander of the Most Excellent...
- of Notre Dame du Lac, known simply as Notre Dame (/ˌnoʊtərˈdeɪm/ NOH-tər-DAYM) or ND, is a private Catholic research university in Notre Dame, Indiana...
- The Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team is the intercollegiate football team representing the University of Notre Dame in Notre Dame, Indiana, north...
- Notre-Dame de Paris (French: [nɔtʁ(ə) dam də paʁi] (listen); meaning "Our Lady of Paris"), referred to simply as Notre-Dame, is a medieval Catholic cathedral...
- Dame×Prince, also known as DamePri (ダメプリ, Damepuri), is a ****anese otome visual novel created by NHN PlayArt. It was released in ****an on March 31, 2016...
- Notre Dame in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Notre Dame, French for "Our Lady", a title of Mary, mother of Jesus, most commonly refers to: Notre-Dame de...
- A pantomime dame is a traditional role in British pantomime. It is part of the theatrical tradition of travesti portrayal of female characters by male...
- In French mythology or folklore, Dames Blanches (meaning literally white ladies) were female spirits or supernatural beings, comparable to the Weiße Frauen...
- Dame Elizabeth Rosemond "Liz" Taylor DBE (February 27, 1932 – March 23, 2011) was a British and American actress. She began her career as a child actress...