Definition of squirearchy. Meaning of squirearchy. Synonyms of squirearchy

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word squirearchy. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word squirearchy and, of course, squirearchy synonyms and on the right images related to the word squirearchy.

Definition of squirearchy

squirearchy
Squirarchy Squir"arch*y, n. [Squire + -archy.] The gentlemen, or gentry, of a country, collectively. [Written also squirearchy.]

Meaning of squirearchy from wikipedia

- The landed gentry, or simply the gentry, is a largely historical British social cl**** consisting in theory of landowners who could live entirely from rental...
- several eminent authors, but attracted a coterie that was dubbed the Squirearchy. He was also a poet and historian, who captained a famous literary cricket-team...
- the squires at this time that modern historians have created the term 'squirearchy'. Politically, during the 19th century, squires tended to be Tories,...
- Bourgeoisie and Imperialism embrace the usurers, the merchants, and the feudal squirearchy without to expel the Reformist Bourgeoisie from the Dominant Alliance...
- Otto Hintze described it, replaced the older system with its feudal squirearchy run in the interests of the ruling cl****, but which in its rudimentary...
- category of Britain's country houses are those that belonged to the squirearchy or landed gentry. These tend either to have evolved from medieval hall...
- curriculum of the cl****ics, and mostly served 'the aristocracy and the squirearchy' ; most of the old endowed grammar schools serving a broad social base...
- The subsequent fate of the Georgian poets (inevitably known as the Squirearchy) then became an aspect of the critical debate surrounding modernist poetry...
- condition that the name was used by the beneficiary; the English gentry and "squirearchy" had long encouraged this sort of name changing. Given this strong tradition...
- after 1850 (by benefactors among the Catholic aristocracy and recusant squirearchy), mainly Benedictine but including a Cistercian Abbey at Mount St. Bernard...
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