Definition of Pointed. Meaning of Pointed. Synonyms of Pointed

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Pointed. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Pointed and, of course, Pointed synonyms and on the right images related to the word Pointed.

Definition of Pointed

Pointed
Point Point, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Pointed; p. pr. & vb. n. Pointing.] [Cf. F. pointer. See Point, n.] 1. To give a point to; to sharpen; to cut, forge, grind, or file to an acute end; as, to point a dart, or a pencil. Used also figuratively; as, to point a moral. 2. To direct toward an abject; to aim; as, to point a gun at a wolf, or a cannon at a fort. 3. Hence, to direct the attention or notice of. Whosoever should be guided through his battles by Minerva, and pointed to every scene of them. --Pope. 4. To supply with punctuation marks; to punctuate; as, to point a composition. 5. To mark (as Hebrew) with vowel points. 6. To give particular prominence to; to designate in a special manner; to indicate, as if by pointing; as, the error was pointed out. --Pope. He points it, however, by no deviation from his straightforward manner of speech. --Dickens. 7. To indicate or discover by a fixed look, as game. 8. (Masonry) To fill up and finish the joints of (a wall), by introducing additional cement or mortar, and bringing it to a smooth surface. 9. (Stone Cutting) To cut, as a surface, with a pointed tool. To point a rope (Naut.), to taper and neatly finish off the end by interweaving the nettles. To point a sail (Naut.), to affix points through the eyelet holes of the reefs. To point off, to divide into periods or groups, or to separate, by pointing, as figures. To point the yards (of a vessel) (Naut.), to brace them so that the wind shall strike the sails obliquely. --Totten.
Pointed
Pointed Point"ed, a. 1. Sharp; having a sharp point; as, a pointed rock. 2. Characterized by sharpness, directness, or pithiness of expression; terse; epigrammatic; especially, directed to a particular person or thing. His moral pleases, not his pointed wit. --Pope. Pointed arch (Arch.), an arch with a pointed crown. Pointed style (Arch.), a name given to that style of architecture in which the pointed arch is the predominant feature; -- more commonly called Gothic. -- Point"ed*ly, adv. -- Point"ed*ness, n.
Point
Point Point, n. 1. (Med.) A pointed piece of quill or bone covered at one end with vaccine matter; -- called also vaccine point. 2. One of the raised dots used in certain systems of printing and writing for the blind. The first practical system was that devised by Louis Braille in 1829, and still used in Europe (see Braille). Two modifications of this are current in the United States: New York point founded on three bases of equidistant points arranged in two lines (viz., : :: :::), and a later improvement, American Braille, embodying the Braille base (:::) and the New-York-point principle of using the characters of few points for the commonest letters. 3. In technical senses: (a) In various games, a position of a certain player, or, by extension, the player himself; as: (1) (Lacrosse & Ice Hockey) The position of the player of each side who stands a short distance in front of the goal keeper; also, the player himself. (2) (Baseball) (pl.) The position of the pitcher and catcher. (b) (Hunting) A spot to which a straight run is made; hence, a straight run from point to point; a cross-country run. [Colloq. Oxf. E. D.] (c) (Falconry) The perpendicular rising of a hawk over the place where its prey has gone into cover. (d) Act of pointing, as of the foot downward in certain dance positions.
Point
Point Point (point), v. t. & i. To appoint. [Obs.] --Spenser.
Point
Point Point, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Pointed; p. pr. & vb. n. Pointing.] [Cf. F. pointer. See Point, n.] 1. To give a point to; to sharpen; to cut, forge, grind, or file to an acute end; as, to point a dart, or a pencil. Used also figuratively; as, to point a moral. 2. To direct toward an abject; to aim; as, to point a gun at a wolf, or a cannon at a fort. 3. Hence, to direct the attention or notice of. Whosoever should be guided through his battles by Minerva, and pointed to every scene of them. --Pope. 4. To supply with punctuation marks; to punctuate; as, to point a composition. 5. To mark (as Hebrew) with vowel points. 6. To give particular prominence to; to designate in a special manner; to indicate, as if by pointing; as, the error was pointed out. --Pope. He points it, however, by no deviation from his straightforward manner of speech. --Dickens. 7. To indicate or discover by a fixed look, as game. 8. (Masonry) To fill up and finish the joints of (a wall), by introducing additional cement or mortar, and bringing it to a smooth surface. 9. (Stone Cutting) To cut, as a surface, with a pointed tool. To point a rope (Naut.), to taper and neatly finish off the end by interweaving the nettles. To point a sail (Naut.), to affix points through the eyelet holes of the reefs. To point off, to divide into periods or groups, or to separate, by pointing, as figures. To point the yards (of a vessel) (Naut.), to brace them so that the wind shall strike the sails obliquely. --Totten.
Point
Point Point (point), v. i. 1. To direct the point of something, as of a finger, for the purpose of designating an object, and attracting attention to it; -- with at. Now must the world point at poor Katharine. --Shak. Point at the tattered coat and ragged shoe. --Dryden. 2. To indicate the presence of game by fixed and steady look, as certain hunting dogs do. He treads with caution, and he points with fear. --Gay. 3. (Med.) To approximate to the surface; to head; -- said of an abscess. To point at, to treat with scorn or contempt by pointing or directing attention to. To point well (Naut.), to sail close to the wind; -- said of a vessel.

Meaning of Pointed from wikipedia

- Throughout the history of footwear, shoes or fashion boots with very long, pointed toes have been favored at various periods and in various cultures or sub-cultures...
- In mathematics, a pointed space is a topological space with a distinguished point, the basepoint. The distinguished point is just simply one particular...
- Pointed hats have been a distinctive item of headgear of a wide range of cultures throughout history. Though often suggesting an ancient Indo-European...
- A five-pointed star (☆), geometrically a regular concave decagon, is a common ideogram in modern culture. Comparatively rare in cl****ical heraldry, it...
- were the basis for the development of the Minié Ball. Among the first pointed or "conical" bullets were those designed by Captain John Norton of the...
- fight, etc. Melee weapons can be broadly divided into three categories: Pointed weapons, which cover spears, pikes and almost all pole weapons. They typically...
- Pointed Roofs, published in 1915, is the first work (she called it a "chapter") in Dorothy Richardson's (1873 – 1957) series of 13 semi-autobiographical...
- A red star, five-pointed and filled (★), is an important symbol often ****ociated with communist ideology, particularly in combination with hammer and...
- manslaughter. The predominant symbol of this criminal gang is the six-pointed Star of David. "National Gang Threat ****essment 2009". National Gang Intelligence...
- In mathematics, a pointed set (also based set or rooted set) is an ordered pair ( X , x 0 ) {\displaystyle (X,x_{0})} where X {\displaystyle X} is a set...
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