Definition of specular iron. Meaning of specular iron. Synonyms of specular iron

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Definition of specular iron

Specular iron
Iron I"ron ([imac]"[u^]rn), n. [OE. iren, AS. [=i]ren, [=i]sen, [=i]sern; akin to D. ijzer, OS. [=i]sarn, OHG. [=i]sarn, [=i]san, G. eisen, Icel. [=i]sarn, j[=a]rn, Sw. & Dan. jern, and perh. to E. ice; cf. Ir. iarann, W. haiarn, Armor. houarn.] 1. (Chem.) The most common and most useful metallic element, being of almost universal occurrence, usually in the form of an oxide (as hematite, magnetite, etc.), or a hydrous oxide (as limonite, turgite, etc.). It is reduced on an enormous scale in three principal forms; viz., cast iron, steel, and wrought iron. Iron usually appears dark brown, from oxidation or impurity, but when pure, or on a fresh surface, is a gray or white metal. It is easily oxidized (rusted) by moisture, and is attacked by many corrosive agents. Symbol Fe (Latin Ferrum). Atomic weight 55.9. Specific gravity, pure iron, 7.86; cast iron, 7.1. In magnetic properties, it is superior to all other substances. Note: The value of iron is largely due to the facility with which it can be worked. Thus, when heated it is malleable and ductile, and can be easily welded and forged at a high temperature. As cast iron, it is easily fusible; as steel, is very tough, and (when tempered) very hard and elastic. Chemically, iron is grouped with cobalt and nickel. Steel is a variety of iron containing more carbon than wrought iron, but less that cast iron. It is made either from wrought iron, by roasting in a packing of carbon (cementation) or from cast iron, by burning off the impurities in a Bessemer converter (then called Bessemer steel), or directly from the iron ore (as in the Siemens rotatory and generating furnace). 2. An instrument or utensil made of iron; -- chiefly in composition; as, a flatiron, a smoothing iron, etc. My young soldier, put up your iron. --Shak. 3. pl. Fetters; chains; handcuffs; manacles. Four of the sufferers were left to rot in irons. --Macaulay. 4. Strength; power; firmness; inflexibility; as, to rule with a rod of iron. Bar iron. See Wrought iron (below). Bog iron, bog ore; limonite. See Bog ore, under Bog. Cast iron (Metal.), an impure variety of iron, containing from three to six percent of carbon, part of which is united with a part of the iron, as a carbide, and the rest is uncombined, as graphite. It there is little free carbon, the product is white iron; if much of the carbon has separated as graphite, it is called gray iron. See also Cast iron, in the Vocabulary. Fire irons. See under Fire, n. Gray irons. See under Fire, n. Gray iron. See Cast iron (above). It irons (Naut.), said of a sailing vessel, when, in tacking, she comes up head to the wind and will not fill away on either tack. Magnetic iron. See Magnetite. Malleable iron (Metal.), iron sufficiently pure or soft to be capable of extension under the hammer; also, specif., a kind of iron produced by removing a portion of the carbon or other impurities from cast iron, rendering it less brittle, and to some extent malleable. Meteoric iron (Chem.), iron forming a large, and often the chief, ingredient of meteorites. It invariably contains a small amount of nickel and cobalt. Cf. Meteorite. Pig iron, the form in which cast iron is made at the blast furnace, being run into molds, called pigs. Reduced iron. See under Reduced. Specular iron. See Hematite. Too many irons in the fire, too many objects requiring the attention at once. White iron. See Cast iron (above). Wrought iron (Metal.), the purest form of iron commonly known in the arts, containing only about half of one per cent of carbon. It is made either directly from the ore, as in the Catalan forge or bloomery, or by purifying (puddling) cast iron in a reverberatory furnace or refinery. It is tough, malleable, and ductile. When formed into bars, it is called bar iron.
specular iron
Hematite Hem"a*tite, n. [L. haematites, Gr. ? bloodlike, fr. a"i^ma, a"i`matos, blood.] (Min.) An important ore of iron, the sesquioxide, so called because of the red color of the powder. It occurs in splendent rhombohedral crystals, and in massive and earthy forms; -- the last called red ocher. Called also specular iron, oligist iron, rhombohedral iron ore, and bloodstone. See Brown hematite, under Brown.

Meaning of specular iron from wikipedia

- as the main ore of iron. Varieties include kidney ore, martite (pseudomorphs after magnetite), iron rose and specularite (specular hematite). While these...
- Spiegeleisen (literally "mirror-iron", German: Spiegel—mirror or specular; Eisen—iron) is a ferromanganese alloy containing approximately 15% manganese...
- suspensions to fabricate cellulose nanocrystals films with tuneable specular and off-specular optical response Voice coil Retail media case decouplers[clarification...
- Empire on June 12, 2012. Ironclad's Iron Engine supports a number of advanced features including per-pixel specular lighting, dynamic fractal generation...
- specular hematite. Setolazar Company, working the Navarrete mine, had an extensive concession estimated to contain more than 4 million tons of iron ore...
- southern part of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, to a high-grade, m****ive specular hematite ore (66% iron) ****ociated with a schistose rock composed of granular quartz...
- of the detailed physical characteristics of the original light, called specular reflection. This is different from other light-reflecting objects that...
- was superior to that of the Fitzroy Iron Works. The iron ore deposit was described as, "Specular hematite of excellent quality". It was noted that, "The...
- Scott (February 25, 2011). "Exclusive Stream: Between The Buried And Me's 'Specular Reflection'". Alternative Press. Retrieved March 3, 2011. MetalSucks Staff...
- known mine. The site was known to Early Man for its deposits of red and specular haematite, used in cosmetics and rituals. Red ochre from here was extracted...
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