Definition of Wine. Meaning of Wine. Synonyms of Wine

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Definition of Wine

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Birch wine
Birch Birch (b[~e]rch), n.; pl. Birches (-[e^]z). [OE. birche, birk, AS. birce, beorc; akin to Icel. bj["o]rk, Sw. bj["o]rk, Dan. birk, D. berk, OHG. piricha, MHG. birche, birke, G. birke, Russ. bereza, Pol. brzoza, Serv. breza, Skr. bh[=u]rja. [root]254. Cf. 1st Birk.] 1. A tree of several species, constituting the genus Betula; as, the white or common birch (B. alba) (also called silver birch and lady birch); the dwarf birch (B. glandulosa); the paper or canoe birch (B. papyracea); the yellow birch (B. lutea); the black or cherry birch (B. lenta). 2. The wood or timber of the birch. 3. A birch twig or birch twigs, used for flogging. Note: The twigs of the common European birch (B. alba), being tough and slender, were formerly much used for rods in schools. They were also made into brooms. The threatening twigs of birch. --Shak. 4. A birch-bark canoe. Birch of Jamaica, a species (Bursera gummifera) of turpentine tree. Birch partridge. (Zo["o]l.) See Ruffed grouse. Birch wine, wine made of the spring sap of the birch. Oil of birch. (a) An oil obtained from the bark of the common European birch (Betula alba), and used in the preparation of genuine (and sometimes of the imitation) Russia leather, to which it gives its peculiar odor. (b) An oil prepared from the black birch (B. lenta), said to be identical with the oil of wintergreen, for which it is largely sold.
Brandywine
Brandywine Bran"dy*wine`, n. Brandy. [Obs.] --Wiseman.
Cape wine
Cape Cape (k[=a]p), n. [F. cap, fr. It. capo head, cape, fr. L. caput heat, end, point. See Chief.] A piece or point of land, extending beyond the adjacent coast into the sea or a lake; a promontory; a headland. Cape buffalo (Zo["o]l.) a large and powerful buffalo of South Africa (Bubalus Caffer). It is said to be the most dangerous wild beast of Africa. See Buffalo, 2. Cape jasmine, Cape jassamine. See Jasmine. Cape pigeon (Zo["o]l.), a petrel (Daptium Capense) common off the Cape of Good Hope. It is about the size of a pigeon. Cape wine, wine made in South Africa [Eng.] The Cape, the Cape of Good Hope, in the general sense of southern extremity of Africa. Also used of Cape Horn, and, in New England, of Cape Cod.
concrete oil of wine
Etherin E"ther*in, n. (Chem.) A white, crystalline hydrocarbon, regarded as a polymeric variety of ethylene, obtained in heavy oil of wine, the residue left after making ether; -- formerly called also concrete oil of wine.
Dewiness
Dewiness Dew"i*ness, n. State of being dewy.
Disentwine
Disentwine Dis`en*twine", v. t. To free from being entwined or twisted. --Shelley.
Dwine
Dwine Dwine, v. i. [See Dwindle.] To waste away; to pine; to languish. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.] --Gower.
entwine
Intwine In*twine", v. t. [Cf. Entwine.] To twine or twist into, or together; to wreathe; as, a wreath of flowers intwined. [Written also entwine.]
Entwine
Entwine En*twine", v. t. [Pref. en- + twine. Cf. Intwine.] To twine, twist, or wreathe together or round. [Written also intwine.] Entwined in duskier wreaths her braided locks. --Shelley. Thy glorious household stuff did me entwine. --Herbert.
Entwine
Entwine En*twine", v. i. To be twisted or twined. With whose imperial laurels might entwine no cypress. --De Quincey.
Entwinement
Entwinement En*twine"ment, n. A twining or twisting together or round; union. --Bp. Hacket.
Ethereal oil of wine
Ethereal E*the"re*al, a. 1. Pertaining to the hypothetical upper, purer air, or to the higher regions beyond the earth or beyond the atmosphere; celestial; as, ethereal space; ethereal regions. Go, heavenly guest, ethereal messenger. --Milton. 2. Consisting of ether; hence, exceedingly light or airy; tenuous; spiritlike; characterized by extreme delicacy, as form, manner, thought, etc. Vast chain of being, which from God began, Natures ethereal, human, angel, man. --Pope. 3. (Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or resembling, ether; as, ethereal salts. Ethereal oil. (Chem.) See Essential oil, under Essential. Ethereal oil of wine (Chem.), a heavy, yellow, oily liquid consisting essentially of etherin, etherol, and ethyl sulphate. It is the oily residuum left after etherification. Called also heavy oil of wine (distinguished from oil of wine, or [oe]nanthic ether). Ethereal salt (Chem.), a salt of some organic radical as a base; an ester.
Fordwine
Fordwine For*dwine", v. i. To dwindle away; to disappear. [Obs.] --Rom of R.
Ginger wine
Ginger Gin"ger, n. [OE. ginger, gingever, gingivere, OF. gengibre, gingimbre, F. gingembre, L. zingiber, zingiberi, fr. Gr. ?; of Oriental origin; cf. Ar. & Pers. zenjeb[=i]l, fr. Skr. ???gav["e]ra, prop., hornshaped; ???ga horn + v["e]ra body.] 1. (Bot.) A plant of the genus Zingiber, of the East and West Indies. The species most known is Z. officinale. 2. The hot and spicy rootstock of Zingiber officinale, which is much used in cookery and in medicine. Ginger beer or ale, a mild beer impregnated with ginger. Ginger cordial, a liquor made from ginger, raisins, lemon rind, and water, and sometimes whisky or brandy. Ginger pop. See Ginger beer (above). Ginger wine, wine impregnated with ginger. Wild ginger (Bot.), an American herb (Asarum Canadense) with two reniform leaves and a long, cordlike rootstock which has a strong taste of ginger.
heavy oil of wine
Ethereal E*the"re*al, a. 1. Pertaining to the hypothetical upper, purer air, or to the higher regions beyond the earth or beyond the atmosphere; celestial; as, ethereal space; ethereal regions. Go, heavenly guest, ethereal messenger. --Milton. 2. Consisting of ether; hence, exceedingly light or airy; tenuous; spiritlike; characterized by extreme delicacy, as form, manner, thought, etc. Vast chain of being, which from God began, Natures ethereal, human, angel, man. --Pope. 3. (Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or resembling, ether; as, ethereal salts. Ethereal oil. (Chem.) See Essential oil, under Essential. Ethereal oil of wine (Chem.), a heavy, yellow, oily liquid consisting essentially of etherin, etherol, and ethyl sulphate. It is the oily residuum left after etherification. Called also heavy oil of wine (distinguished from oil of wine, or [oe]nanthic ether). Ethereal salt (Chem.), a salt of some organic radical as a base; an ester.
Intertwine
Intertwine In`ter*twine", v. t. To unite by twining one with another; to entangle; to interlace. --Milton.
Intertwine
Intertwine In`ter*twine", v. i. To be twined or twisted together; to become mutually involved or enfolded.
Intertwine
Intertwine In`ter*twine", n. The act intertwining, or the state of being intertwined. --Coleridge.
Intwine
Intwine In*twine", v. t. [Cf. Entwine.] To twine or twist into, or together; to wreathe; as, a wreath of flowers intwined. [Written also entwine.]
Intwine
Intwine In*twine", v. i. To be or to become intwined.
intwine
Entwine En*twine", v. t. [Pref. en- + twine. Cf. Intwine.] To twine, twist, or wreathe together or round. [Written also intwine.] Entwined in duskier wreaths her braided locks. --Shelley. Thy glorious household stuff did me entwine. --Herbert.
Intwinement
Intwinement In*twine"ment, n. The act of twinning, or the state of being intwined.
Lager wine
Lager wine La"ger wine` Wine which has been kept for some time in the cellar. --Simmonds.
of wine
Spirit Spir"it, n. [OF. espirit, esperit, F. esprit, L. spiritus, from spirare to breathe, to blow. Cf. Conspire, Expire, Esprit, Sprite.] 1. Air set in motion by breathing; breath; hence, sometimes, life itself. [Obs.] ``All of spirit would deprive.' --Spenser. The mild air, with season moderate, Gently attempered, and disposed eo well, That still it breathed foorth sweet spirit. --Spenser. 2. A rough breathing; an aspirate, as the letter h; also, a mark to denote aspiration; a breathing. [Obs.] Be it a letter or spirit, we have great use for it. --B. Jonson. 3. Life, or living substance, considered independently of corporeal existence; an intelligence conceived of apart from any physical organization or embodiment; vital essence, force, or energy, as distinct from matter. 4. The intelligent, immaterial and immortal part of man; the soul, in distinction from the body in which it resides; the agent or subject of vital and spiritual functions, whether spiritual or material. There is a spirit in man; and the inspiration of the Almighty giveth them understanding. --Job xxxii. 8. As the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also. --James ii. 26. Spirit is a substance wherein thinking, knowing, doubting, and a power of moving, do subsist. --Locke. 5. Specifically, a disembodied soul; the human soul after it has left the body. Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was, and the spirit shall return unto God who gave it. --Eccl. xii. 7. Ye gentle spirits far away, With whom we shared the cup of grace. --Keble. 6. Any supernatural being, good or bad; an apparition; a specter; a ghost; also, sometimes, a sprite,; a fairy; an elf. Whilst young, preserve his tender mind from all impressions of spirits and goblins in the dark. --Locke. 7. Energy, vivacity, ardor, enthusiasm, courage, etc. ``Write it then, quickly,' replied Bede; and summoning all his spirits together, like the last blaze of a candle going out, he indited it, and expired. --Fuller. 8. One who is vivacious or lively; one who evinces great activity or peculiar characteristics of mind or temper; as, a ruling spirit; a schismatic spirit. Such spirits as he desired to please, such would I choose for my judges. --Dryden. 9. Temper or disposition of mind; mental condition or disposition; intellectual or moral state; -- often in the plural; as, to be cheerful, or in good spirits; to be downhearted, or in bad spirits. God has . . . made a spirit of building succeed a spirit of pulling down. --South. A perfect judge will read each work of wit With the same spirit that its author writ. --Pope. 10. Intent; real meaning; -- opposed to the letter, or to formal statement; also, characteristic quality, especially such as is derived from the individual genius or the personal character; as, the spirit of an enterprise, of a document, or the like. 11. Tenuous, volatile, airy, or vapory substance, possessed of active qualities. All bodies have spirits . . . within them. --Bacon. 12. Any liquid produced by distillation; especially, alcohol, the spirits, or spirit, of wine (it having been first distilled from wine): -- often in the plural. 13. pl. Rum, whisky, brandy, gin, and other distilled liquors having much alcohol, in distinction from wine and malt liquors. 14. (Med.) A solution in alcohol of a volatile principle. Cf. Tincture. --U. S. Disp. 15. (Alchemy) Any one of the four substances, sulphur, sal ammoniac, quicksilver, or arsenic (or, according to some, orpiment). The four spirits and the bodies seven. --Chaucer. 16. (Dyeing) Stannic chloride. See under Stannic. Note: Spirit is sometimes joined with other words, forming compounds, generally of obvious signification; as, spirit-moving, spirit-searching, spirit-stirring, etc. Astral spirits, Familiar spirits, etc. See under Astral, Familiar, etc. Animal spirits. (a) (Physiol.) The fluid which at one time was supposed to circulate through the nerves and was regarded as the agent of sensation and motion; -- called also the nervous fluid, or nervous principle. (b) Physical health and energy; frolicsomeness; sportiveness. Ardent spirits, strong alcoholic liquors, as brandy, rum, whisky, etc., obtained by distillation. Holy Spirit, or The Spirit (Theol.), the Spirit of God, or the third person of the Trinity; the Holy Ghost. The spirit also signifies the human spirit as influenced or animated by the Divine Spirit. Proof spirit. (Chem.) See under Proof. Rectified spirit (Chem.), spirit rendered purer or more concentrated by redistillation, so as to increase the percentage of absolute alcohol. Spirit butterfly (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of delicate butterflies of tropical America belonging to the genus Ithomia. The wings are gauzy and nearly destitute of scales. Spirit duck. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The buffle-headed duck. (b) The golden-eye. Spirit lamp (Art), a lamp in which alcohol or methylated spirit is burned. Spirit level. See under Level. Spirit of hartshorn. (Old Chem.) See under Hartshorn. Spirit of Mindererus (Med.), an aqueous solution of acetate of ammonium; -- named after R. Minderer, physician of Augsburg. Spirit of nitrous ether (Med. Chem.), a pale yellow liquid, of a sweetish taste and a pleasant ethereal odor. It is obtained by the distillation of alcohol with nitric and sulphuric acids, and consists essentially of ethyl nitrite with a little acetic aldehyde. It is used as a diaphoretic, diuretic, antispasmodic, etc. Called also sweet spirit of niter. Spirit of salt (Chem.), hydrochloric acid; -- so called because obtained from salt and sulphuric acid. [Obs.] Spirit of sense, the utmost refinement of sensation. [Obs.] --Shak. Spirits, or Spirit, of turpentine (Chem.), rectified oil of turpentine, a transparent, colorless, volatile, and very inflammable liquid, distilled from the turpentine of the various species of pine; camphine. See Camphine. Spirit of vitriol (Chem.), sulphuric acid; -- so called because formerly obtained by the distillation of green vitriol. [Obs.] Spirit of vitriolic ether (Chem.) ether; -- often but incorrectly called sulphuric ether. See Ether. [Obs.] Spirits, or Spirit, of wine (Chem.), alcohol; -- so called because formerly obtained by the distillation of wine. Spirit rapper, one who practices spirit rapping; a ``medium' so called. Spirit rapping, an alleged form of communication with the spirits of the dead by raps. See Spiritualism, 3. Sweet spirit of niter. See Spirit of nitrous ether, above.
oil of wine
OEnanthic [OE]*nan"thic, a. [Gr. ? the first shoot of the vine, the vine blossom, the vine; ? the vine + ? bloom, ? flower.] (Chem.) Having, or imparting, the odor characteristic of the bouquet of wine; specifically used, formerly, to designate an acid whose ethereal salts were supposed to occasion the peculiar bouquet, or aroma, of old wine. Cf. [OE]nanthylic. [OE]nanthic acid, an acid obtained from [oe]nanthic ether by the action of alkalies. [OE]nanthic ether, an ethereal substance (not to be confused with the bouquet, or aroma, of wine) found in wine lees, and consisting of a complex mixture of the ethereal salts of several of the higher acids of the acetic acid series. It has an ethereal odor, and it used in flavoring artificial wines and liquors. Called also oil of wine. See Essential oil, under Essential.
Oil of wine
Oil gas, inflammable gas procured from oil, and used for lighting streets, houses, etc. Oil gland. (a) (Zo["o]l.) A gland which secretes oil; especially in birds, the large gland at the base of the tail. (b) (Bot.) A gland, in some plants, producing oil. Oil green, a pale yellowish green, like oil. Oil of brick, empyreumatic oil obtained by subjecting a brick soaked in oil to distillation at a high temperature, -- used by lapidaries as a vehicle for the emery by which stones and gems are sawn or cut. --Brande & C. Oil of talc, a nostrum made of calcined talc, and famous in the 17th century as a cosmetic. [Obs.] --B. Jonson. Oil of vitriol (Chem.), strong sulphuric acid; -- so called from its oily consistency and from its forming the vitriols or sulphates. Oil of wine, [OE]nanthic ether. See under [OE]nanthic. Oil painting. (a) The art of painting in oil colors. (b) Any kind of painting of which the pigments are originally ground in oil. Oil palm (Bot.), a palm tree whose fruit furnishes oil, esp. El[ae]is Guineensis. See El[ae]is. Oil sardine (Zo["o]l.), an East Indian herring (Clupea scombrina), valued for its oil. Oil shark (Zo["o]l.) (a) The liver shark. (b) The tope. Oil still, a still for hydrocarbons, esp. for petroleum. Oil test, a test for determining the temperature at which petroleum oils give off vapor which is liable to explode. Oil tree. (Bot.) (a) A plant of the genus Ricinus (R. communis), from the seeds of which castor oil is obtained. (b) An Indian tree, the mahwa. See Mahwa. (c) The oil palm. To burn the midnight oil, to study or work late at night. Volatle oils. See Essential oils, under Essential.
Outtwine
Outtwine Out*twine", v. t. To disentangle. [Obs.]
Palm wine
Palm Palm, n. [AS. palm, L. palma; -- so named fr. the leaf resembling a hand. See lst Palm, and cf. Pam.] 1. (Bot.) Any endogenous tree of the order Palm[ae] or Palmace[ae]; a palm tree. Note: Palms are perennial woody plants, often of majestic size. The trunk is usually erect and rarely branched, and has a roughened exterior composed of the persistent bases of the leaf stalks. The leaves are borne in a terminal crown, and are supported on stout, sheathing, often prickly, petioles. They are usually of great size, and are either pinnately or palmately many-cleft. There are about one thousand species known, nearly all of them growing in tropical or semitropical regions. The wood, petioles, leaves, sap, and fruit of many species are invaluable in the arts and in domestic economy. Among the best known are the date palm, the cocoa palm, the fan palm, the oil palm, the wax palm, the palmyra, and the various kinds called cabbage palm and palmetto. 2. A branch or leaf of the palm, anciently borne or worn as a symbol of victory or rejoicing. A great multitude . . . stood before the throne, and before the Lamb, clothed with white robes, and palme in their hands. --Rev. vii. 9. 3. Hence: Any symbol or token of superiority, success, or triumph; also, victory; triumph; supremacy. ``The palm of martyrdom.' --Chaucer. So get the start of the majestic world And bear the palm alone. --Shak. Molucca palm (Bot.), a labiate herb from Asia (Molucella l[ae]vis), having a curious cup-shaped calyx. Palm cabbage, the terminal bud of a cabbage palm, used as food. Palm cat (Zo["o]l.), the common paradoxure. Palm crab (Zo["o]l.), the purse crab. Palm oil, a vegetable oil, obtained from the fruit of several species of palms, as the African oil palm (El[ae]is Guineensis), and used in the manufacture of soap and candles. See El[ae]is. Palm swift (Zo["o]l.), a small swift (Cypselus Batassiensis) which frequents the palmyra and cocoanut palms in India. Its peculiar nest is attached to the leaf of the palmyra palm. Palm toddy. Same as Palm wine. Palm weevil (Zo["o]l.), any one of mumerous species of very large weevils of the genus Rhynchophorus. The larv[ae] bore into palm trees, and are called palm borers, and grugru worms. They are considered excellent food. Palm wine, the sap of several species of palms, especially, in India, of the wild date palm (Ph[oe]nix sylvestrix), the palmyra, and the Caryota urens. When fermented it yields by distillation arrack, and by evaporation jaggery. Called also palm toddy. Palm worm, or Palmworm. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The larva of a palm weevil. (b) A centipede.
Rape wine
Rape Rape (r[=a]p), n. [F. r[^a]pe a grape stalk.] 1. Fruit, as grapes, plucked from the cluster. --Ray. 2. The refuse stems and skins of grapes or raisins from which the must has been expressed in wine making. 3. A filter containing the above refuse, used in clarifying and perfecting malt, vinegar, etc. Rape wine, a poor, thin wine made from the last dregs of pressed grapes.
Shadowiness
Shadowiness Shad"ow*i*ness, n. The quality or state of being shadowy.

Meaning of Wine from wikipedia

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- production of wine, starting with the selection of the fruit, its fermentation into alcohol, and the bottling of the finished liquid. The history of wine-making...
- Port wine (also known as vinho do Porto, Portuguese pronunciation: [ˌviɲuduˈpoɾtu], Porto, and usually simply port) is a Portuguese fortified wine produced...
- This list of wine-producing regions catalogues significant growing regions where vineyards are planted. Wine grapes mostly grow between the 30th and the...
- Fortified wine is a wine to which a distilled spirit, usually brandy, is added. Many different styles of fortified wine have been developed, including...
- Last of the Summer Wine is a British sitcom created and written by Roy Clarke and originally broadcast by the BBC from 1973 to 2010. It premiered as an...
- Sparkling wine is a wyn with significant levels of carbon dioxide in it, making it fizzy. While the phrase commonly refers to champagne, EU countries legally...
- Ice wine (or icewine; German: Eiswein) is a type of dessert wine produced from grapes that have been frozen while still on the vine. The sugars and other...
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