Definition of Surpliced. Meaning of Surpliced. Synonyms of Surpliced

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Surpliced. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Surpliced and, of course, Surpliced synonyms and on the right images related to the word Surpliced.

Definition of Surpliced

Surpliced
Surpliced Sur"pliced, a. Wearing a surplice.

Meaning of Surpliced from wikipedia

- A surplice (/ˈsɜːrplɪs/; Late Latin superpelliceum, from super, "over" and pellicia, "fur garment") is a liturgical vestment of the Western Christian Church...
- Surplice (1845–1871) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and sire. In a career that lasted from July 1847 to October 1849 he ran thirteen times and won...
- Surplice fees were, in English ecclesiastical law, the fees paid to the in****bent of a parish for rites such as baptisms, weddings, and funerals. They...
- red for cardinals. In house dress, it is silver with a silver chain. Surplice A white tunic worn over a c****ock or habit. It is commonly worn by altar...
- the term "priest", among other things, and that the wearing of cap and surplice become optional. James was strict in enforcing conformity at first, inducing...
- Franciscans, Dominicans, etc.), the habit is worn in place of the c****ock, the surplice (or rochet if the wearer is a bishop, cardinal, or canon), and the biretta...
- adorable little Arlésienne going to her First Communion, the priest in his surplice, who looks like a dangerous rhinoceros, the people drinking absinthe, all...
- parish churches. In 1841, the rebuilt Leeds Parish Church established a surpliced choir to accompany parish services, drawing explicitly on the musical...
- deacon wears an identical choir dress to an Anglican priest: c****ock, surplice, tippet and academic hood. However, liturgically, deacons usually wear...
- stoles, and chasubles, the lay ****istants may also be vested in c****ock and surplice. The sung Eucharist tends to be emphasized in High Church congregations...
Loading...