Definition of Strict. Meaning of Strict. Synonyms of Strict

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Definition of Strict

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Adstrict
Adstrict Ad*strict", v. t. -- Ad*stric"tion, n. See Astrict, and Astriction.
Adstriction
Adstrict Ad*strict", v. t. -- Ad*stric"tion, n. See Astrict, and Astriction.
Adstrictory
Adstrictory Ad*stric"to*ry, a. See Astrictory.
Astrict
Astrict As*trict", a. Concise; contracted. [Obs.] --Weever.
Astrict
Astrict As*trict", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Astricted; p. pr. & vb. n. Astricting.] [L. astrictus, p. p. of astringere. See Astringe.] 1. To bind up; to confine; to constrict; to contract. The solid parts were to be relaxed or astricted. --Arbuthnot. 2. To bind; to constrain; to restrict; to limit. [R.] The mind is astricted to certain necessary modes or forms of thought. --Sir W. Hamilton. 3. (Scots Law) To restrict the tenure of; as, to astrict lands. See Astriction, 4. --Burrill.
Astricted
Astrict As*trict", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Astricted; p. pr. & vb. n. Astricting.] [L. astrictus, p. p. of astringere. See Astringe.] 1. To bind up; to confine; to constrict; to contract. The solid parts were to be relaxed or astricted. --Arbuthnot. 2. To bind; to constrain; to restrict; to limit. [R.] The mind is astricted to certain necessary modes or forms of thought. --Sir W. Hamilton. 3. (Scots Law) To restrict the tenure of; as, to astrict lands. See Astriction, 4. --Burrill.
Astricting
Astrict As*trict", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Astricted; p. pr. & vb. n. Astricting.] [L. astrictus, p. p. of astringere. See Astringe.] 1. To bind up; to confine; to constrict; to contract. The solid parts were to be relaxed or astricted. --Arbuthnot. 2. To bind; to constrain; to restrict; to limit. [R.] The mind is astricted to certain necessary modes or forms of thought. --Sir W. Hamilton. 3. (Scots Law) To restrict the tenure of; as, to astrict lands. See Astriction, 4. --Burrill.
Astriction
Astriction As*tric"tion, n. [L. astrictio.] 1. The act of binding; restriction; also, obligation. --Milton. 2. (Med.) (a) A contraction of parts by applications; the action of an astringent substance on the animal economy. --Dunglison. (b) Constipation. --Arbuthnot. 3. Astringency. [Obs.] --Bacon. 4. (Scots Law) An obligation to have the grain growing on certain lands ground at a certain mill, the owner paying a toll. --Bell. Note: The lands were said to be astricted to the mill.
Astrictive
Astrictive As*tric"tive, a. Binding; astringent. -- n. An astringent. -- As*tric"tive*ly, adv.
Astrictively
Astrictive As*tric"tive, a. Binding; astringent. -- n. An astringent. -- As*tric"tive*ly, adv.
Astrictory
Astrictory As*tric"to*ry, a. Astrictive. [R.]
Bascanium constrictor
Black snake Black" snake` (sn[=a]k) or Blacksnake Black"snake, n. (Zo["o]l.) A snake of a black color, of which two species are common in the United States, the Bascanium constrictor, or racer, sometimes six feet long, and the Scotophis Alleghaniensis, seven or eight feet long. Note: The name is also applied to various other black serpents, as Natrix atra of Jamaica.
Boa constrictor
Boa constrictor Bo"a con*strict"or [NL. See Boa, and Constrictor.] (Zo["o]l.) A large and powerful serpent of tropical America, sometimes twenty or thirty feet long. See Illustration in Appendix. Note: It has a succession of spots, alternately black and yellow, extending along the back. It kills its prey by constriction. The name is also loosely applied to other large serpents which crush their prey, particularly to those of the genus Python, found in Asia and Africa.
Congressional district
District Dis"trict, n. [LL. districtus district, fr. L. districtus, p. p. of distringere: cf. F. district. See Distrain.] 1. (Feudal Law) The territory within which the lord has the power of coercing and punishing. 2. A division of territory; a defined portion of a state, town, or city, etc., made for administrative, electoral, or other purposes; as, a congressional district, judicial district, land district, school district, etc. To exercise exclusive legislation . . . over such district not exceeding ten miles square. --The Constitution of the United States. 3. Any portion of territory of undefined extent; a region; a country; a tract. These districts which between the tropics lie. --Blackstone. Congressional district. See under Congressional. District attorney, the prosecuting officer of a district or district court. District court, a subordinate municipal, state, or United States tribunal, having jurisdiction in certain cases within a judicial district. District judge, one who presides over a district court. District school, a public school for the children within a school district. [U.S.] Syn: Division; circuit; quarter; province; tract; region; country.
Congressional District
Congressional Con*gres"sion*al, a. Of or pertaining to a congress, especially, to the Congress of the United States; as, congressional debates. Congressional and official labor. --E. Everett. Congressional District, one of the divisions into which a State is periodically divided (according to population), each of which is entitled to elect a Representative to the Congress of the United States.
Constrict
Constrict Con*strict", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Constricted; p. pr. & vb. n. Constricting.] [L. constrictus, p. p. of constringere. See Constrain.] To draw together; to render narrower or smaller; to bind; to cramp; to contract or cause to shrink. Such things as constrict the fibers. --Arbuthnot. Membranous organs inclosing a cavity which their contraction serves to constrict. --Todd & Bowman.
Constricted
Constrict Con*strict", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Constricted; p. pr. & vb. n. Constricting.] [L. constrictus, p. p. of constringere. See Constrain.] To draw together; to render narrower or smaller; to bind; to cramp; to contract or cause to shrink. Such things as constrict the fibers. --Arbuthnot. Membranous organs inclosing a cavity which their contraction serves to constrict. --Todd & Bowman.
Constricted
Constricted Con*strict"ed, a. 1. Drawn together; bound; contracted; cramped. 2. (Bot.) Contracted or compressed so as to be smaller in certain places or parts than in others.
Constricting
Constrict Con*strict", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Constricted; p. pr. & vb. n. Constricting.] [L. constrictus, p. p. of constringere. See Constrain.] To draw together; to render narrower or smaller; to bind; to cramp; to contract or cause to shrink. Such things as constrict the fibers. --Arbuthnot. Membranous organs inclosing a cavity which their contraction serves to constrict. --Todd & Bowman.
Constriction
Constriction Con*stric"tion, n. [L. constrictio: cf. F. constriction.] 1. The act of constricting by means of some inherent power or by movement or change in the thing itself, as distinguished from compression. 2. The state of being constricted; the point where a thing is constricted; a narrowing or binding. A constriction of the parts inservient to speech. --Grew.
Constrictive
Constrictive Con*strict"ive, a. Serving or tending to bind or constrict.
Constrictor
Constrictor Con*strict"or, n. 1. That which constricts, draws together, or contracts. 2. (Anat.) A muscle which contracts or closes an orifice, or which compresses an organ; a sphincter. 3. (Zo["o]l.) A serpent that kills its prey by inclosing and crushing it with its folds; as, the boa constrictor.
District
District Dis"trict, a. [L. districtus, p. p.] Rigorous; stringent; harsh. [Obs.] Punishing with the rod of district severity. --Foxe.
District
District Dis"trict, n. [LL. districtus district, fr. L. districtus, p. p. of distringere: cf. F. district. See Distrain.] 1. (Feudal Law) The territory within which the lord has the power of coercing and punishing. 2. A division of territory; a defined portion of a state, town, or city, etc., made for administrative, electoral, or other purposes; as, a congressional district, judicial district, land district, school district, etc. To exercise exclusive legislation . . . over such district not exceeding ten miles square. --The Constitution of the United States. 3. Any portion of territory of undefined extent; a region; a country; a tract. These districts which between the tropics lie. --Blackstone. Congressional district. See under Congressional. District attorney, the prosecuting officer of a district or district court. District court, a subordinate municipal, state, or United States tribunal, having jurisdiction in certain cases within a judicial district. District judge, one who presides over a district court. District school, a public school for the children within a school district. [U.S.] Syn: Division; circuit; quarter; province; tract; region; country.
District
District Dis"trict, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Districted; p. pr. & vb. n. Districting.] To divide into districts or limited portions of territory; as, legislatures district States for the choice of representatives.
District attorney
District Dis"trict, n. [LL. districtus district, fr. L. districtus, p. p. of distringere: cf. F. district. See Distrain.] 1. (Feudal Law) The territory within which the lord has the power of coercing and punishing. 2. A division of territory; a defined portion of a state, town, or city, etc., made for administrative, electoral, or other purposes; as, a congressional district, judicial district, land district, school district, etc. To exercise exclusive legislation . . . over such district not exceeding ten miles square. --The Constitution of the United States. 3. Any portion of territory of undefined extent; a region; a country; a tract. These districts which between the tropics lie. --Blackstone. Congressional district. See under Congressional. District attorney, the prosecuting officer of a district or district court. District court, a subordinate municipal, state, or United States tribunal, having jurisdiction in certain cases within a judicial district. District judge, one who presides over a district court. District school, a public school for the children within a school district. [U.S.] Syn: Division; circuit; quarter; province; tract; region; country.
District court
District Dis"trict, n. [LL. districtus district, fr. L. districtus, p. p. of distringere: cf. F. district. See Distrain.] 1. (Feudal Law) The territory within which the lord has the power of coercing and punishing. 2. A division of territory; a defined portion of a state, town, or city, etc., made for administrative, electoral, or other purposes; as, a congressional district, judicial district, land district, school district, etc. To exercise exclusive legislation . . . over such district not exceeding ten miles square. --The Constitution of the United States. 3. Any portion of territory of undefined extent; a region; a country; a tract. These districts which between the tropics lie. --Blackstone. Congressional district. See under Congressional. District attorney, the prosecuting officer of a district or district court. District court, a subordinate municipal, state, or United States tribunal, having jurisdiction in certain cases within a judicial district. District judge, one who presides over a district court. District school, a public school for the children within a school district. [U.S.] Syn: Division; circuit; quarter; province; tract; region; country.
District judge
District Dis"trict, n. [LL. districtus district, fr. L. districtus, p. p. of distringere: cf. F. district. See Distrain.] 1. (Feudal Law) The territory within which the lord has the power of coercing and punishing. 2. A division of territory; a defined portion of a state, town, or city, etc., made for administrative, electoral, or other purposes; as, a congressional district, judicial district, land district, school district, etc. To exercise exclusive legislation . . . over such district not exceeding ten miles square. --The Constitution of the United States. 3. Any portion of territory of undefined extent; a region; a country; a tract. These districts which between the tropics lie. --Blackstone. Congressional district. See under Congressional. District attorney, the prosecuting officer of a district or district court. District court, a subordinate municipal, state, or United States tribunal, having jurisdiction in certain cases within a judicial district. District judge, one who presides over a district court. District school, a public school for the children within a school district. [U.S.] Syn: Division; circuit; quarter; province; tract; region; country.
District school
School School, n. [OE. scole, AS. sc?lu, L. schola, Gr. ? leisure, that in which leisure is employed, disputation, lecture, a school, probably from the same root as ?, the original sense being perhaps, a stopping, a resting. See Scheme.] 1. A place for learned intercourse and instruction; an institution for learning; an educational establishment; a place for acquiring knowledge and mental training; as, the school of the prophets. Disputing daily in the school of one Tyrannus. --Acts xix. 9. 2. A place of primary instruction; an establishment for the instruction of children; as, a primary school; a common school; a grammar school. As he sat in the school at his primer. --Chaucer. 3. A session of an institution of instruction. How now, Sir Hugh! No school to-day? --Shak. 4. One of the seminaries for teaching logic, metaphysics, and theology, which were formed in the Middle Ages, and which were characterized by academical disputations and subtilties of reasoning. At Cambridge the philosophy of Descartes was still dominant in the schools. --Macaulay. 5. The room or hall in English universities where the examinations for degrees and honors are held. 6. An assemblage of scholars; those who attend upon instruction in a school of any kind; a body of pupils. What is the great community of Christians, but one of the innumerable schools in the vast plan which God has instituted for the education of various intelligences? --Buckminster. 7. The disciples or followers of a teacher; those who hold a common doctrine, or accept the same teachings; a sect or denomination in philosophy, theology, science, medicine, politics, etc. Let no man be less confident in his faith . . . by reason of any difference in the several schools of Christians. --Jer. Taylor. 8. The canons, precepts, or body of opinion or practice, sanctioned by the authority of a particular class or age; as, he was a gentleman of the old school. His face pale but striking, though not handsome after the schools. --A. S. Hardy. 9. Figuratively, any means of knowledge or discipline; as, the school of experience. Boarding school, Common school, District school, Normal school, etc. See under Boarding, Common, District, etc. High school, a free public school nearest the rank of a college. [U. S.] School board, a corporation established by law in every borough or parish in England, and elected by the burgesses or ratepayers, with the duty of providing public school accommodation for all children in their district. School committee, School board, an elected committee of citizens having charge and care of the public schools in any district, town, or city, and responsible for control of the money appropriated for school purposes. [U. S.]
District school
District Dis"trict, n. [LL. districtus district, fr. L. districtus, p. p. of distringere: cf. F. district. See Distrain.] 1. (Feudal Law) The territory within which the lord has the power of coercing and punishing. 2. A division of territory; a defined portion of a state, town, or city, etc., made for administrative, electoral, or other purposes; as, a congressional district, judicial district, land district, school district, etc. To exercise exclusive legislation . . . over such district not exceeding ten miles square. --The Constitution of the United States. 3. Any portion of territory of undefined extent; a region; a country; a tract. These districts which between the tropics lie. --Blackstone. Congressional district. See under Congressional. District attorney, the prosecuting officer of a district or district court. District court, a subordinate municipal, state, or United States tribunal, having jurisdiction in certain cases within a judicial district. District judge, one who presides over a district court. District school, a public school for the children within a school district. [U.S.] Syn: Division; circuit; quarter; province; tract; region; country.

Meaning of Strict from wikipedia

- In mathematical writing, the term strict refers to the property of excluding equality and equivalence, and often occurs in the context of inequality and...
- HTTP Strict Transport Security (HSTS) is a web security policy mechanism that helps to protect websites against man-in-the-middle attacks such as protocol...
- strict constructionism refers to a particular legal philosophy of judicial interpretation that limits or restricts judicial interpretation. Strict construction...
- In criminal and civil law, strict liability is a standard of liability under which a person is legally responsible for the consequences flowing from an...
- In American constitutional law, strict scrutiny is the highest and most stringent standard of judicial review, and results in a judge striking down a law...
- not strict is called non-strict. A strict programming language is one in which user-defined functions are always strict. Intuitively, non-strict functions...
- A strict programming language is a programming language which employs a strict programming paradigm, allowing only strict functions (functions whose parameters...
- 4.0 was published as a W3C Recommendation. It offers three variations: Strict, in which deprecated elements are forbidden Transitional, in which deprecated...
- and transitivity). Strict and non-strict partial orders are closely related. A non-strict partial order may be converted to a strict partial order by removing...
- strictly monotheistic because it venerated other yazatas alongside Ahura Mazda. Ancient Hindu theology, meanwhile, was monist, but was not strictly monotheistic...
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