Definition of Salmo. Meaning of Salmo. Synonyms of Salmo

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Definition of Salmo

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Black salmon
Note: The salmons ascend rivers and penetrate to their head streams to spawn. They are remarkably strong fishes, and will even leap over considerable falls which lie in the way of their progress. The common salmon has been known to grow to the weight of seventy-five pounds; more generally it is from fifteen to twenty-five pounds. Young salmon are called parr, peal, smolt, and grilse. Among the true salmons are: Black salmon, or Lake salmon, the namaycush. Dog salmon, a salmon of Western North America (Oncorhynchus keta). Humpbacked salmon, a Pacific-coast salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). King salmon, the quinnat. Landlocked salmon, a variety of the common salmon (var. Sebago), long confined in certain lakes in consequence of obstructions that prevented it from returning to the sea. This last is called also dwarf salmon. Note: Among fishes of other families which are locally and erroneously called salmon are: the pike perch, called jack salmon; the spotted, or southern, squeteague; the cabrilla, called kelp salmon; young pollock, called sea salmon; and the California yellowtail. 2. A reddish yellow or orange color, like the flesh of the salmon. Salmon berry (Bot.), a large red raspberry growing from Alaska to California, the fruit of the Rubus Nutkanus. Salmon killer (Zo["o]l.), a stickleback (Gasterosteus cataphractus) of Western North America and Northern Asia. Salmon ladder, Salmon stair. See Fish ladder, under Fish. Salmon peel, a young salmon. Salmon pipe, a certain device for catching salmon. --Crabb. Salmon trout. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The European sea trout (Salmo trutta). It resembles the salmon, but is smaller, and has smaller and more numerous scales. (b) The American namaycush. (c) A name that is also applied locally to the adult black spotted trout (Salmo purpuratus), and to the steel head and other large trout of the Pacific coast.
chinnook salmon
Quinnat Quin"nat, n. [From the native name.] (Zo["o]l.) The California salmon (Oncorhynchus choicha); -- called also chouicha, king salmon, chinnook salmon, and Sacramento salmon. It is of great commercial importance. [Written also quinnet.]
Dog salmon
Note: The salmons ascend rivers and penetrate to their head streams to spawn. They are remarkably strong fishes, and will even leap over considerable falls which lie in the way of their progress. The common salmon has been known to grow to the weight of seventy-five pounds; more generally it is from fifteen to twenty-five pounds. Young salmon are called parr, peal, smolt, and grilse. Among the true salmons are: Black salmon, or Lake salmon, the namaycush. Dog salmon, a salmon of Western North America (Oncorhynchus keta). Humpbacked salmon, a Pacific-coast salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). King salmon, the quinnat. Landlocked salmon, a variety of the common salmon (var. Sebago), long confined in certain lakes in consequence of obstructions that prevented it from returning to the sea. This last is called also dwarf salmon. Note: Among fishes of other families which are locally and erroneously called salmon are: the pike perch, called jack salmon; the spotted, or southern, squeteague; the cabrilla, called kelp salmon; young pollock, called sea salmon; and the California yellowtail. 2. A reddish yellow or orange color, like the flesh of the salmon. Salmon berry (Bot.), a large red raspberry growing from Alaska to California, the fruit of the Rubus Nutkanus. Salmon killer (Zo["o]l.), a stickleback (Gasterosteus cataphractus) of Western North America and Northern Asia. Salmon ladder, Salmon stair. See Fish ladder, under Fish. Salmon peel, a young salmon. Salmon pipe, a certain device for catching salmon. --Crabb. Salmon trout. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The European sea trout (Salmo trutta). It resembles the salmon, but is smaller, and has smaller and more numerous scales. (b) The American namaycush. (c) A name that is also applied locally to the adult black spotted trout (Salmo purpuratus), and to the steel head and other large trout of the Pacific coast.
dwarf salmon
Note: The salmons ascend rivers and penetrate to their head streams to spawn. They are remarkably strong fishes, and will even leap over considerable falls which lie in the way of their progress. The common salmon has been known to grow to the weight of seventy-five pounds; more generally it is from fifteen to twenty-five pounds. Young salmon are called parr, peal, smolt, and grilse. Among the true salmons are: Black salmon, or Lake salmon, the namaycush. Dog salmon, a salmon of Western North America (Oncorhynchus keta). Humpbacked salmon, a Pacific-coast salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). King salmon, the quinnat. Landlocked salmon, a variety of the common salmon (var. Sebago), long confined in certain lakes in consequence of obstructions that prevented it from returning to the sea. This last is called also dwarf salmon. Note: Among fishes of other families which are locally and erroneously called salmon are: the pike perch, called jack salmon; the spotted, or southern, squeteague; the cabrilla, called kelp salmon; young pollock, called sea salmon; and the California yellowtail. 2. A reddish yellow or orange color, like the flesh of the salmon. Salmon berry (Bot.), a large red raspberry growing from Alaska to California, the fruit of the Rubus Nutkanus. Salmon killer (Zo["o]l.), a stickleback (Gasterosteus cataphractus) of Western North America and Northern Asia. Salmon ladder, Salmon stair. See Fish ladder, under Fish. Salmon peel, a young salmon. Salmon pipe, a certain device for catching salmon. --Crabb. Salmon trout. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The European sea trout (Salmo trutta). It resembles the salmon, but is smaller, and has smaller and more numerous scales. (b) The American namaycush. (c) A name that is also applied locally to the adult black spotted trout (Salmo purpuratus), and to the steel head and other large trout of the Pacific coast.
Humpbacked salmon
Note: The salmons ascend rivers and penetrate to their head streams to spawn. They are remarkably strong fishes, and will even leap over considerable falls which lie in the way of their progress. The common salmon has been known to grow to the weight of seventy-five pounds; more generally it is from fifteen to twenty-five pounds. Young salmon are called parr, peal, smolt, and grilse. Among the true salmons are: Black salmon, or Lake salmon, the namaycush. Dog salmon, a salmon of Western North America (Oncorhynchus keta). Humpbacked salmon, a Pacific-coast salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). King salmon, the quinnat. Landlocked salmon, a variety of the common salmon (var. Sebago), long confined in certain lakes in consequence of obstructions that prevented it from returning to the sea. This last is called also dwarf salmon. Note: Among fishes of other families which are locally and erroneously called salmon are: the pike perch, called jack salmon; the spotted, or southern, squeteague; the cabrilla, called kelp salmon; young pollock, called sea salmon; and the California yellowtail. 2. A reddish yellow or orange color, like the flesh of the salmon. Salmon berry (Bot.), a large red raspberry growing from Alaska to California, the fruit of the Rubus Nutkanus. Salmon killer (Zo["o]l.), a stickleback (Gasterosteus cataphractus) of Western North America and Northern Asia. Salmon ladder, Salmon stair. See Fish ladder, under Fish. Salmon peel, a young salmon. Salmon pipe, a certain device for catching salmon. --Crabb. Salmon trout. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The European sea trout (Salmo trutta). It resembles the salmon, but is smaller, and has smaller and more numerous scales. (b) The American namaycush. (c) A name that is also applied locally to the adult black spotted trout (Salmo purpuratus), and to the steel head and other large trout of the Pacific coast.
Humpbacked salmon
Humpbacked salmon Hump"backed` salm"on A small salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) which ascends the rivers of the Pacific coast from California to Alaska, and also on the Asiatic side. In the breeding season the male has a large dorsal hump and distorted jaws.
jack salmon
Note: The salmons ascend rivers and penetrate to their head streams to spawn. They are remarkably strong fishes, and will even leap over considerable falls which lie in the way of their progress. The common salmon has been known to grow to the weight of seventy-five pounds; more generally it is from fifteen to twenty-five pounds. Young salmon are called parr, peal, smolt, and grilse. Among the true salmons are: Black salmon, or Lake salmon, the namaycush. Dog salmon, a salmon of Western North America (Oncorhynchus keta). Humpbacked salmon, a Pacific-coast salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). King salmon, the quinnat. Landlocked salmon, a variety of the common salmon (var. Sebago), long confined in certain lakes in consequence of obstructions that prevented it from returning to the sea. This last is called also dwarf salmon. Note: Among fishes of other families which are locally and erroneously called salmon are: the pike perch, called jack salmon; the spotted, or southern, squeteague; the cabrilla, called kelp salmon; young pollock, called sea salmon; and the California yellowtail. 2. A reddish yellow or orange color, like the flesh of the salmon. Salmon berry (Bot.), a large red raspberry growing from Alaska to California, the fruit of the Rubus Nutkanus. Salmon killer (Zo["o]l.), a stickleback (Gasterosteus cataphractus) of Western North America and Northern Asia. Salmon ladder, Salmon stair. See Fish ladder, under Fish. Salmon peel, a young salmon. Salmon pipe, a certain device for catching salmon. --Crabb. Salmon trout. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The European sea trout (Salmo trutta). It resembles the salmon, but is smaller, and has smaller and more numerous scales. (b) The American namaycush. (c) A name that is also applied locally to the adult black spotted trout (Salmo purpuratus), and to the steel head and other large trout of the Pacific coast.
Kelp salmon
Kelp Kelp, n. [Formerly kilpe; of unknown origin.] 1. The calcined ashes of seaweed, -- formerly much used in the manufacture of glass, now used in the manufacture of iodine. 2. (Bot.) Any large blackish seaweed. Note: Laminaria is the common kelp of Great Britain; Macrocystis pyrifera and Nereocystis Lutkeana are the great kelps of the Pacific Ocean. Kelp crab (Zo["o]l.), a California spider crab (Epialtus productus), found among seaweeds, which it resembles in color. Kelp salmon (Zo["o]l.), a serranoid food fish (Serranus clathratus) of California. See Cabrilla.
kelp salmon
Note: The salmons ascend rivers and penetrate to their head streams to spawn. They are remarkably strong fishes, and will even leap over considerable falls which lie in the way of their progress. The common salmon has been known to grow to the weight of seventy-five pounds; more generally it is from fifteen to twenty-five pounds. Young salmon are called parr, peal, smolt, and grilse. Among the true salmons are: Black salmon, or Lake salmon, the namaycush. Dog salmon, a salmon of Western North America (Oncorhynchus keta). Humpbacked salmon, a Pacific-coast salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). King salmon, the quinnat. Landlocked salmon, a variety of the common salmon (var. Sebago), long confined in certain lakes in consequence of obstructions that prevented it from returning to the sea. This last is called also dwarf salmon. Note: Among fishes of other families which are locally and erroneously called salmon are: the pike perch, called jack salmon; the spotted, or southern, squeteague; the cabrilla, called kelp salmon; young pollock, called sea salmon; and the California yellowtail. 2. A reddish yellow or orange color, like the flesh of the salmon. Salmon berry (Bot.), a large red raspberry growing from Alaska to California, the fruit of the Rubus Nutkanus. Salmon killer (Zo["o]l.), a stickleback (Gasterosteus cataphractus) of Western North America and Northern Asia. Salmon ladder, Salmon stair. See Fish ladder, under Fish. Salmon peel, a young salmon. Salmon pipe, a certain device for catching salmon. --Crabb. Salmon trout. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The European sea trout (Salmo trutta). It resembles the salmon, but is smaller, and has smaller and more numerous scales. (b) The American namaycush. (c) A name that is also applied locally to the adult black spotted trout (Salmo purpuratus), and to the steel head and other large trout of the Pacific coast.
kelp salmon
Cabrilla Ca*bril"la, n. [Sp., prawn.] (Zo["o]l) A name applied to various species of edible fishes of the genus Serranus, and related genera, inhabiting the Meditarranean, the coast of California, etc. In California, some of them are also called rock bass and kelp salmon.
King salmon
Note: The salmons ascend rivers and penetrate to their head streams to spawn. They are remarkably strong fishes, and will even leap over considerable falls which lie in the way of their progress. The common salmon has been known to grow to the weight of seventy-five pounds; more generally it is from fifteen to twenty-five pounds. Young salmon are called parr, peal, smolt, and grilse. Among the true salmons are: Black salmon, or Lake salmon, the namaycush. Dog salmon, a salmon of Western North America (Oncorhynchus keta). Humpbacked salmon, a Pacific-coast salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). King salmon, the quinnat. Landlocked salmon, a variety of the common salmon (var. Sebago), long confined in certain lakes in consequence of obstructions that prevented it from returning to the sea. This last is called also dwarf salmon. Note: Among fishes of other families which are locally and erroneously called salmon are: the pike perch, called jack salmon; the spotted, or southern, squeteague; the cabrilla, called kelp salmon; young pollock, called sea salmon; and the California yellowtail. 2. A reddish yellow or orange color, like the flesh of the salmon. Salmon berry (Bot.), a large red raspberry growing from Alaska to California, the fruit of the Rubus Nutkanus. Salmon killer (Zo["o]l.), a stickleback (Gasterosteus cataphractus) of Western North America and Northern Asia. Salmon ladder, Salmon stair. See Fish ladder, under Fish. Salmon peel, a young salmon. Salmon pipe, a certain device for catching salmon. --Crabb. Salmon trout. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The European sea trout (Salmo trutta). It resembles the salmon, but is smaller, and has smaller and more numerous scales. (b) The American namaycush. (c) A name that is also applied locally to the adult black spotted trout (Salmo purpuratus), and to the steel head and other large trout of the Pacific coast.
king salmon
Quinnat Quin"nat, n. [From the native name.] (Zo["o]l.) The California salmon (Oncorhynchus choicha); -- called also chouicha, king salmon, chinnook salmon, and Sacramento salmon. It is of great commercial importance. [Written also quinnet.]
lake salmon
Namaycush Nam"ay*cush, n. [Indian name.] (Zool.) A large North American lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush). It is usually spotted with red, and sometimes weighs over forty pounds. Called also Mackinaw trout, lake trout, lake salmon, salmon trout, togue, and tuladi.
Lake salmon
Note: The salmons ascend rivers and penetrate to their head streams to spawn. They are remarkably strong fishes, and will even leap over considerable falls which lie in the way of their progress. The common salmon has been known to grow to the weight of seventy-five pounds; more generally it is from fifteen to twenty-five pounds. Young salmon are called parr, peal, smolt, and grilse. Among the true salmons are: Black salmon, or Lake salmon, the namaycush. Dog salmon, a salmon of Western North America (Oncorhynchus keta). Humpbacked salmon, a Pacific-coast salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). King salmon, the quinnat. Landlocked salmon, a variety of the common salmon (var. Sebago), long confined in certain lakes in consequence of obstructions that prevented it from returning to the sea. This last is called also dwarf salmon. Note: Among fishes of other families which are locally and erroneously called salmon are: the pike perch, called jack salmon; the spotted, or southern, squeteague; the cabrilla, called kelp salmon; young pollock, called sea salmon; and the California yellowtail. 2. A reddish yellow or orange color, like the flesh of the salmon. Salmon berry (Bot.), a large red raspberry growing from Alaska to California, the fruit of the Rubus Nutkanus. Salmon killer (Zo["o]l.), a stickleback (Gasterosteus cataphractus) of Western North America and Northern Asia. Salmon ladder, Salmon stair. See Fish ladder, under Fish. Salmon peel, a young salmon. Salmon pipe, a certain device for catching salmon. --Crabb. Salmon trout. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The European sea trout (Salmo trutta). It resembles the salmon, but is smaller, and has smaller and more numerous scales. (b) The American namaycush. (c) A name that is also applied locally to the adult black spotted trout (Salmo purpuratus), and to the steel head and other large trout of the Pacific coast.
Landlocked salmon
Note: The salmons ascend rivers and penetrate to their head streams to spawn. They are remarkably strong fishes, and will even leap over considerable falls which lie in the way of their progress. The common salmon has been known to grow to the weight of seventy-five pounds; more generally it is from fifteen to twenty-five pounds. Young salmon are called parr, peal, smolt, and grilse. Among the true salmons are: Black salmon, or Lake salmon, the namaycush. Dog salmon, a salmon of Western North America (Oncorhynchus keta). Humpbacked salmon, a Pacific-coast salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). King salmon, the quinnat. Landlocked salmon, a variety of the common salmon (var. Sebago), long confined in certain lakes in consequence of obstructions that prevented it from returning to the sea. This last is called also dwarf salmon. Note: Among fishes of other families which are locally and erroneously called salmon are: the pike perch, called jack salmon; the spotted, or southern, squeteague; the cabrilla, called kelp salmon; young pollock, called sea salmon; and the California yellowtail. 2. A reddish yellow or orange color, like the flesh of the salmon. Salmon berry (Bot.), a large red raspberry growing from Alaska to California, the fruit of the Rubus Nutkanus. Salmon killer (Zo["o]l.), a stickleback (Gasterosteus cataphractus) of Western North America and Northern Asia. Salmon ladder, Salmon stair. See Fish ladder, under Fish. Salmon peel, a young salmon. Salmon pipe, a certain device for catching salmon. --Crabb. Salmon trout. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The European sea trout (Salmo trutta). It resembles the salmon, but is smaller, and has smaller and more numerous scales. (b) The American namaycush. (c) A name that is also applied locally to the adult black spotted trout (Salmo purpuratus), and to the steel head and other large trout of the Pacific coast.
M salmoides
Black bass Black" bass` (Zo["o]l.) 1. An edible, fresh-water fish of the United States, of the genus Micropterus. the small-mouthed kind is M. dolomie[=i]; the large-mouthed is M. salmoides. 2. The sea bass. See Blackfish, 3.
Psalmodic
Psalmodic Psal*mod"ic, Psalmodical Psal*mod"ic*al, a. [Cf. F. psalmodique.] Relating to psalmody.
Psalmodical
Psalmodic Psal*mod"ic, Psalmodical Psal*mod"ic*al, a. [Cf. F. psalmodique.] Relating to psalmody.
Psalmodist
Psalmodist Psal"mo*dist, n. One who sings sacred songs; a psalmist.
Psalmodize
Psalmodize Psal"mo*dize, v. i. To practice psalmody. `` The psalmodizing art.' --J. G. Cooper.
Psalmody
Psalmody Psal"mo*dy, n. [Gr. ?; ? psalm + ? a song, an ode: cf. F. psalmodie, LL. psalmodia. See Psalm, and Ode.] The act, practice, or art of singing psalms or sacred songs; also, psalms collectively, or a collection of psalms.
Psalmograph
Psalmograph Psal"mo*graph, n. [See Psalmographer.] A writer of psalms; a psalmographer.
Psalmographer
Psalmographer Psal*mog"ra*pher, Psalmographist Psal*mog"ra*phist, n. [L. psalmographus, Gr. ?; ? a psalm + ? to write.] A writer of psalms, or sacred songs and hymns.
Psalmographist
Psalmographer Psal*mog"ra*pher, Psalmographist Psal*mog"ra*phist, n. [L. psalmographus, Gr. ?; ? a psalm + ? to write.] A writer of psalms, or sacred songs and hymns.
Psalmography
Psalmography Psal*mog"ra*phy, n. [Cf. F. psalmographie.] The act or practice of writing psalms, or sacred songs.
red salmon
Nerka Ner"ka, n. [Russ. niarka, prob. fr. native name.] (Zo["o]l.) The most important salmon of Alaska (Oncorhinchus nerka), ascending in spring most rivers and lakes from Alaska to Oregon, Washington, and Idaho; -- called also red salmon, redfish, blueback, and sawqui.
Sacramento salmon
Quinnat Quin"nat, n. [From the native name.] (Zo["o]l.) The California salmon (Oncorhynchus choicha); -- called also chouicha, king salmon, chinnook salmon, and Sacramento salmon. It is of great commercial importance. [Written also quinnet.]
Salmo Cambricus
Bluepoll Blue"poll`, n. [Blue + poll head.] (Zo["o]l.) A kind of salmon (Salmo Cambricus) found in Wales.
Salmo fario
Note: The most important European species are the river, or brown, trout (Salmo fario), the salmon trout, and the sewen. The most important American species are the brook, speckled, or red-spotted, trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) of the Northern United States and Canada; the red-spotted trout, or Dolly Varden (see Malma); the lake trout (see Namaycush); the black-spotted, mountain, or silver, trout (Salmo purpuratus); the golden, or rainbow, trout (see under Rainbow); the blueback trout (see Oquassa); and the salmon trout (see under Salmon.) The European trout has been introduced into America. 2. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of marine fishes more or less resembling a trout in appearance or habits, but not belonging to the same family, especially the California rock trouts, the common squeteague, and the southern, or spotted, squeteague; -- called also salt-water trout, sea trout, shad trout, and gray trout. See Squeteague, and Rock trout under Rock. Trout perch (Zo["o]l.), a small fresh-water American fish (Percopsis guttatus), allied to the trout, but resembling a perch in its scales and mouth.
Salmo Gairdneri
Steelhead Steel"head`, n. 1. (Zo["o]l.) A North Pacific salmon (Salmo Gairdneri) found from Northern California to Siberia; -- called also hardhead, and preesil. 2. (Zo["o]l.) The ruddy duck.

Meaning of Salmo from wikipedia

- them the familiar Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and the brown trout Salmo trutta. The natural distribution of Salmo also extends to Northern Africa and...
- The Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) is a species of ray-finned fish in the family Salmonidae. It is found in the northern Atlantic Ocean, in rivers that...
- Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus species) than to the Salmosbrown trout (Salmo trutta) or Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) of the Atlantic basin. Thus, in 1989...
- The brown trout (Salmo trutta) is a European species of salmonid fish that has been widely introduced into suitable environments globally. It includes...
- number of species of freshwater fish belonging to the genera Oncorhynchus, Salmo and Salvelinus, all of the subfamily Salmoninae of the family Salmonidae...
- Salmo, aka Maurizio Pisciottu (born June 29, 1984), is an Italian rapper. His 2016 album ****visback placed at the first place on the Italian hit parade...
- Salmo is a village muni****lity in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia, Canada. It is located in the Salmo River Valley, surrounded...
- Salmo salvelinus and Salmo umbla, which were later considered as synonyms of S. alpinus. John Richardson (1836) separated them into a subgenus Salmo (Salvelinus)...
- in regional Italian dialect so a single wind may have different names. Salmo carpio, also known as the carpione (carpione del Garda or Lake Garda carpione)...
- whitefish. Salmon are native to tributaries of the North Atlantic (genus Salmo) and Pacific Ocean (genus Oncorhynchus). Many species of salmon have been...
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