Definition of Resin. Meaning of Resin. Synonyms of Resin

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Definition of Resin

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Botany Bay resin
Botany Bay Bot"a*ny Bay" A harbor on the east coast of Australia, and an English convict settlement there; -- so called from the number of new plants found on its shore at its discovery by Cook in 1770. Note: Hence, any place to which desperadoes resort. Botany Bay kino (Med.), an astringent, reddish substance consisting of the inspissated juice of several Australian species of Eucalyptus. Botany Bay resin (Med.), a resin of reddish yellow color, resembling gamboge, the product of different Australian species of Xanthorrh[ae]a, esp. the grass tree (X. hastilis).
Ceresin
Ceresin Cer"e*sin, n. [L. cera wax.] (Chem.) A white wax, made by bleaching and purifying ozocerite, and used as a substitute for beeswax.
G resinosa
Huckleberry Huc"kle*ber`ry, n. [Cf. Whortleberry.] (Bot.) (a) The edible black or dark blue fruit of several species of the American genus Gaylussacia, shrubs nearly related to the blueberries (Vaccinium), and formerly confused with them. The commonest huckelberry comes from G. resinosa. (b) The shrub that bears the berries. Called also whortleberry. Squaw huckleberry. See Deeberry.
Kauri resin
Kauri resin Kauri resin, gum gum, or copal copal A resinous product of the kauri, found in the form of yellow or brown lumps in the ground where the trees have grown. It is used for making varnish, and as a substitute for amber.
Oleoresin
Oleoresin O`le*o*res"in, n. [L. oleum oil + E. resin.] 1. (Chem.) A natural mixture of a terebinthinate oil and a resin. 2. (Med.) A liquid or semiliquid preparation extracted (as from capsicum, cubebs, or ginger) by means of ether, and consisting of fixed or volatile oil holding resin in solution. -- O`le*o*res"in*ous, a.
Oleoresinous
Oleoresin O`le*o*res"in, n. [L. oleum oil + E. resin.] 1. (Chem.) A natural mixture of a terebinthinate oil and a resin. 2. (Med.) A liquid or semiliquid preparation extracted (as from capsicum, cubebs, or ginger) by means of ether, and consisting of fixed or volatile oil holding resin in solution. -- O`le*o*res"in*ous, a.
P resinosa
Pine Pine, n. [AS. p[=i]n, L. pinus.] 1. (Bot.) Any tree of the coniferous genus Pinus. See Pinus. Note: There are about twenty-eight species in the United States, of which the white pine (P. Strobus), the Georgia pine (P. australis), the red pine (P. resinosa), and the great West Coast sugar pine (P. Lambertiana) are among the most valuable. The Scotch pine or fir, also called Norway or Riga pine (Pinus sylvestris), is the only British species. The nut pine is any pine tree, or species of pine, which bears large edible seeds. See Pinon. The spruces, firs, larches, and true cedars, though formerly considered pines, are now commonly assigned to other genera. 2. The wood of the pine tree. 3. A pineapple. Ground pine. (Bot.) See under Ground. Norfolk Island pine (Bot.), a beautiful coniferous tree, the Araucaria excelsa. Pine barren, a tract of infertile land which is covered with pines. [Southern U.S.] Pine borer (Zo["o]l.), any beetle whose larv[ae] bore into pine trees. Pine finch. (Zo["o]l.) See Pinefinch, in the Vocabulary. Pine grosbeak (Zo["o]l.), a large grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator), which inhabits the northern parts of both hemispheres. The adult male is more or less tinged with red. Pine lizard (Zo["o]l.), a small, very active, mottled gray lizard (Sceloporus undulatus), native of the Middle States; -- called also swift, brown scorpion, and alligator. Pine marten. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A European weasel (Mustela martes), called also sweet marten, and yellow-breasted marten. (b) The American sable. See Sable. Pine moth (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small tortricid moths of the genus Retinia, whose larv[ae] burrow in the ends of the branchlets of pine trees, often doing great damage. Pine mouse (Zo["o]l.), an American wild mouse (Arvicola pinetorum), native of the Middle States. It lives in pine forests. Pine needle (Bot.), one of the slender needle-shaped leaves of a pine tree. See Pinus. Pine-needle wool. See Pine wool (below). Pine oil, an oil resembling turpentine, obtained from fir and pine trees, and used in making varnishes and colors. Pine snake (Zo["o]l.), a large harmless North American snake (Pituophis melanoleucus). It is whitish, covered with brown blotches having black margins. Called also bull snake. The Western pine snake (P. Sayi) is chestnut-brown, mottled with black and orange. Pine tree (Bot.), a tree of the genus Pinus; pine. Pine-tree money, money coined in Massachusetts in the seventeenth century, and so called from its bearing a figure of a pine tree. Pine weevil (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of weevils whose larv[ae] bore in the wood of pine trees. Several species are known in both Europe and America, belonging to the genera Pissodes, Hylobius, etc. Pine wool, a fiber obtained from pine needles by steaming them. It is prepared on a large scale in some of the Southern United States, and has many uses in the economic arts; -- called also pine-needle wool, and pine-wood wool.
Piney resin
Piney Pin"ey, a. [Of East Indian origin.] A term used in designating an East Indian tree (the Vateria Indica or piney tree, of the order Dipterocarpe[ae], which grows in Malabar, etc.) or its products. Piney dammar, Piney resin, Piney varnish, a pellucid, fragrant, acrid, bitter resin, which exudes from the piney tree (Vateria Indica) when wounded. It is used as a varnish, in making candles, and as a substitute for incense and for amber. Called also liquid copal, and white dammar. Piney tallow, a solid fatty substance, resembling tallow, obtained from the roasted seeds of the Vateria Indica; called also dupada oil. Piney thistle (Bot.), a plant (Atractylis gummifera), from the bark of which, when wounded, a gummy substance exudes.
Pinus resinosa
Red horse. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any large American red fresh-water sucker, especially Moxostoma macrolepidotum and allied species. (b) See the Note under Drumfish. Red lead. (Chem) See under Lead, and Minium. Red-lead ore. (Min.) Same as Crocoite. Red liquor (Dyeing), a solution consisting essentially of aluminium acetate, used as a mordant in the fixation of dyestuffs on vegetable fiber; -- so called because used originally for red dyestuffs. Called also red mordant. Red maggot (Zo["o]l.), the larva of the wheat midge. Red manganese. (Min.) Same as Rhodochrosite. Red man, one of the American Indians; -- so called from his color. Red maple (Bot.), a species of maple (Acer rubrum). See Maple. Red mite. (Zo["o]l.) See Red spider, below. Red mulberry (Bot.), an American mulberry of a dark purple color (Morus rubra). Red mullet (Zo["o]l.), the surmullet. See Mullet. Red ocher (Min.), a soft earthy variety of hematite, of a reddish color. Red perch (Zo["o]l.), the rosefish. Red phosphorus. (Chem.) See under Phosphorus. Red pine (Bot.), an American species of pine (Pinus resinosa); -- so named from its reddish bark. Red precipitate. See under Precipitate. Red Republican (European Politics), originally, one who maintained extreme republican doctrines in France, -- because a red liberty cap was the badge of the party; an extreme radical in social reform. [Cant] Red ribbon, the ribbon of the Order of the Bath in England. Red sanders. (Bot.) See Sanders. Red sandstone. (Geol.) See under Sandstone. Red scale (Zo["o]l.), a scale insect (Aspidiotus aurantii) very injurious to the orange tree in California and Australia. Red silver (Min.), an ore of silver, of a ruby-red or reddish black color. It includes proustite, or light red silver, and pyrargyrite, or dark red silver. Red snapper (Zo["o]l.), a large fish (Lutlanus aya or Blackfordii) abundant in the Gulf of Mexico and about the Florida reefs. Red snow, snow colored by a mocroscopic unicellular alga (Protococcus nivalis) which produces large patches of scarlet on the snows of arctic or mountainous regions. Red softening (Med.) a form of cerebral softening in which the affected parts are red, -- a condition due either to infarction or inflammation. Red spider (Zo["o]l.), a very small web-spinning mite (Tetranychus telarius) which infests, and often destroys, plants of various kinds, especially those cultivated in houses and conservatories. It feeds mostly on the under side of the leaves, and causes them to turn yellow and die. The adult insects are usually pale red. Called also red mite. Red squirrel (Zo["o]l.), the chickaree. Red tape, the tape used in public offices for tying up documents, etc.; hence, official formality and delay.
Resin soap
Soap Soap, n. [OE. sope, AS. s[=a]pe; akin to D. zeep, G. seife, OHG. seifa, Icel. s[=a]pa, Sw. s?pa, Dan. s?be, and perhaps to AS. s[=i]pan to drip, MHG. s[=i]fen, and L. sebum tallow. Cf. Saponaceous.] A substance which dissolves in water, thus forming a lather, and is used as a cleansing agent. Soap is produced by combining fats or oils with alkalies or alkaline earths, usually by boiling, and consists of salts of sodium, potassium, etc., with the fatty acids (oleic, stearic, palmitic, etc.). See the Note below, and cf. Saponification. By extension, any compound of similar composition or properties, whether used as a cleaning agent or not. Note: In general, soaps are of two classes, hard and soft. Calcium, magnesium, lead, etc., form soaps, but they are insoluble and useless. The purifying action of soap depends upon the fact that it is decomposed by a large quantity of water into free alkali and an insoluble acid salt. The first of these takes away the fatty dirt on washing, and the latter forms the soap lather which envelops the greasy matter and thus tends to remove it. --Roscoe & Schorlemmer. Castile soap, a fine-grained hard soap, white or mottled, made of olive oil and soda; -- called also Marseilles, or Venetian, soap. Hard soap, any one of a great variety of soaps, of different ingredients and color, which are hard and compact. All solid soaps are of this class. Lead soap, an insoluble, white, pliable soap made by saponifying an oil (olive oil) with lead oxide; -- used externally in medicine. Called also lead plaster, diachylon, etc. Marine soap. See under Marine. Pills of soap (Med.), pills containing soap and opium. Potash soap, any soap made with potash, esp. the soft soaps, and a hard soap made from potash and castor oil. Pumice soap, any hard soap charged with a gritty powder, as silica, alumina, powdered pumice, etc., which assists mechanically in the removal of dirt. Resin soap, a yellow soap containing resin, -- used in bleaching. Silicated soap, a cheap soap containing water glass (sodium silicate). Soap bark. (Bot.) See Quillaia bark. Soap bubble, a hollow iridescent globe, formed by blowing a film of soap suds from a pipe; figuratively, something attractive, but extremely unsubstantial. This soap bubble of the metaphysicians. --J. C. Shairp. Soap cerate, a cerate formed of soap, olive oil, white wax, and the subacetate of lead, sometimes used as an application to allay inflammation. Soap fat, the refuse fat of kitchens, slaughter houses, etc., used in making soap. Soap liniment (Med.), a liniment containing soap, camphor, and alcohol. Soap nut, the hard kernel or seed of the fruit of the soapberry tree, -- used for making beads, buttons, etc. Soap plant (Bot.), one of several plants used in the place of soap, as the Chlorogalum pomeridianum, a California plant, the bulb of which, when stripped of its husk and rubbed on wet clothes, makes a thick lather, and smells not unlike new brown soap. It is called also soap apple, soap bulb, and soap weed. Soap tree. (Bot.) Same as Soapberry tree. Soda soap, a soap containing a sodium salt. The soda soaps are all hard soaps. Soft soap, a soap of a gray or brownish yellow color, and of a slimy, jellylike consistence, made from potash or the lye from wood ashes. It is strongly alkaline and often contains glycerin, and is used in scouring wood, in cleansing linen, in dyehouses, etc. Figuratively, flattery; wheedling; blarney. [Colloq.] Toilet soap, hard soap for the toilet, usually colored and perfumed.
Resinaceous
Resinaceous Res`in*a"ceous (-?"sh?s), a. Having the quality of resin; resinous.
Resinate
Resinate Res"in*ate (r?z"?n-?t), n. (Chem.) Any one of the salts the resinic acids.
Resinic
Resinic Re*sin"ic (r?-z?n"?k), a. (Chem.) Pertaining to, or obtained from, resin; as, the resinic acids.
Resino-electric
Resino-electric Res`in*o-e*lec"tric (-?-?-l?k"tr?k), a. (Elec.) Containing or exhibiting resinous electricity.
Resinoid
Resinoid Res"in*oid (r?z"?n-oid), a. Somewhat like resin.
Resinously
Resinously Res"in*ous*ly, adv. By means, or in the manner, of resin.
Resinousness
Resinousness Res"in*ous*ness, n. The quality of being resinous.
Resiny
Resiny Res"in*y (-?), a. Like resin; resinous.

Meaning of Resin from wikipedia

- naturally-occurring resins. Plants secrete resins for their protective benefits in response to injury. The resin protects the plant from insects and pathogens. Resins confound...
- An ion-exchange resin or ion-exchange polymer is a resin or polymer that acts as a medium for ion exchange. It is an insoluble matrix (or support structure)...
- the cured end products of epoxy resins, as well as a colloquial name for the epoxide functional group. Epoxy resins, also known as polyepoxides, are...
- Acrylic resins are a group of related thermoplastic or thermosetting plastic substances derived from acrylic acid, methacrylic acid or other related compounds...
- International Resin Identification Coding System, often abbreviated RIC, is a set of symbols appearing on plastic products that identify the plastic resin out of...
- matrix—most often based on thermosetting polymers such as epoxy, polyester resin, or vinylester—or a thermoplastic. Cheaper and more flexible than carbon...
- Resin casting is a method of plastic casting where a mold is filled with a liquid synthetic resin, which then hardens. It is primarily used for small-scale...
- Phenol formaldehyde resins (PF) or phenolic resins are synthetic polymers obtained by the reaction of phenol or substituted phenol with formaldehyde. Used...
- Dental composite resins (better referred to as "resin-based composites" or simply "filled resins") are types of synthetic resins that are used in dentistry...
- Hashish, or hash, is a drug made from the resin of the cannabis plant. It is consumed by smoking a small piece, typically in a pipe, bong, vaporizer or...
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