Definition of Non . Meaning of Non . Synonyms of Non

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Definition of Non

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Anon right
Anon A*non", adv. [OE. anoon, anon, anan, lit., in one (moment), fr. AS. on in + [=a]n one. See On and One.] 1. Straightway; at once. [Obs.] The same is he that heareth the word, and anon with joy receiveth it. --Matt. xiii. 20. 2. Soon; in a little while. As it shall better appear anon. --Stow. 3. At another time; then; again. Sometimes he trots, . . . anon he rears upright. --Shak. Anon right, at once; right off. [Obs.] --Chaucer. Ever and anon, now and then; frequently; often. A pouncet box, which ever and anon He gave his nose. --Shak.
Avignon berry
Avignon berry A`vignon" ber"ry (Bot.) The fruit of the Rhamnus infectorius, eand of other species of the same genus; -- so called from the city of Avignon, in France. It is used by dyers and painters for coloring yellow. Called also French berry.
Cannon ball
Cannon Can"non, n.; pl. Cannons, collectively Cannon. [F. cannon, fr. L. canna reed, pipe, tube. See Cane.] 1. A great gun; a piece of ordnance or artillery; a firearm for discharging heavy shot with great force. Note: Cannons are made of various materials, as iron, brass, bronze, and steel, and of various sizes and shapes with respect to the special service for which they are intended, as intended, as siege, seacoast, naval, field, or mountain, guns. They always aproach more or less nearly to a cylindrical from, being usually thicker toward the breech than at the muzzle. Formerly they were cast hollow, afterwards they were cast, solid, and bored out. The cannon now most in use for the armament of war vessels and for seacoast defense consists of a forged steel tube reinforced with massive steel rings shrunk upon it. Howitzers and mortars are sometimes called cannon. See Gun. 2. (Mech.) A hollow cylindrical piece carried by a revolving shaft, on which it may, however, revolve independently. 3. (Printing.) A kind of type. See Canon. Cannon ball, strictly, a round solid missile of stone or iron made to be fired from a cannon, but now often applied to a missile of any shape, whether solid or hollow, made for cannon. Elongated and cylindrical missiles are sometimes called bolts; hollow ones charged with explosives are properly called shells. Cannon bullet, a cannon ball. [Obs.] Cannon cracker, a fire cracker of large size. Cannon lock, a device for firing a cannon by a percussion primer. Cannon metal. See Gun Metal. Cannon pinion, the pinion on the minute hand arbor of a watch or clock, which drives the hand but permits it to be moved in setting. Cannon proof, impenetrable by cannon balls. Cannon shot. (a) A cannon ball. (b) The range of a cannon.
Cannon bone
Cannon bone Can"non bone (Anat.) See Canon Bone.
Cannon bullet
Cannon Can"non, n.; pl. Cannons, collectively Cannon. [F. cannon, fr. L. canna reed, pipe, tube. See Cane.] 1. A great gun; a piece of ordnance or artillery; a firearm for discharging heavy shot with great force. Note: Cannons are made of various materials, as iron, brass, bronze, and steel, and of various sizes and shapes with respect to the special service for which they are intended, as intended, as siege, seacoast, naval, field, or mountain, guns. They always aproach more or less nearly to a cylindrical from, being usually thicker toward the breech than at the muzzle. Formerly they were cast hollow, afterwards they were cast, solid, and bored out. The cannon now most in use for the armament of war vessels and for seacoast defense consists of a forged steel tube reinforced with massive steel rings shrunk upon it. Howitzers and mortars are sometimes called cannon. See Gun. 2. (Mech.) A hollow cylindrical piece carried by a revolving shaft, on which it may, however, revolve independently. 3. (Printing.) A kind of type. See Canon. Cannon ball, strictly, a round solid missile of stone or iron made to be fired from a cannon, but now often applied to a missile of any shape, whether solid or hollow, made for cannon. Elongated and cylindrical missiles are sometimes called bolts; hollow ones charged with explosives are properly called shells. Cannon bullet, a cannon ball. [Obs.] Cannon cracker, a fire cracker of large size. Cannon lock, a device for firing a cannon by a percussion primer. Cannon metal. See Gun Metal. Cannon pinion, the pinion on the minute hand arbor of a watch or clock, which drives the hand but permits it to be moved in setting. Cannon proof, impenetrable by cannon balls. Cannon shot. (a) A cannon ball. (b) The range of a cannon.
Cannon cracker
Cannon Can"non, n.; pl. Cannons, collectively Cannon. [F. cannon, fr. L. canna reed, pipe, tube. See Cane.] 1. A great gun; a piece of ordnance or artillery; a firearm for discharging heavy shot with great force. Note: Cannons are made of various materials, as iron, brass, bronze, and steel, and of various sizes and shapes with respect to the special service for which they are intended, as intended, as siege, seacoast, naval, field, or mountain, guns. They always aproach more or less nearly to a cylindrical from, being usually thicker toward the breech than at the muzzle. Formerly they were cast hollow, afterwards they were cast, solid, and bored out. The cannon now most in use for the armament of war vessels and for seacoast defense consists of a forged steel tube reinforced with massive steel rings shrunk upon it. Howitzers and mortars are sometimes called cannon. See Gun. 2. (Mech.) A hollow cylindrical piece carried by a revolving shaft, on which it may, however, revolve independently. 3. (Printing.) A kind of type. See Canon. Cannon ball, strictly, a round solid missile of stone or iron made to be fired from a cannon, but now often applied to a missile of any shape, whether solid or hollow, made for cannon. Elongated and cylindrical missiles are sometimes called bolts; hollow ones charged with explosives are properly called shells. Cannon bullet, a cannon ball. [Obs.] Cannon cracker, a fire cracker of large size. Cannon lock, a device for firing a cannon by a percussion primer. Cannon metal. See Gun Metal. Cannon pinion, the pinion on the minute hand arbor of a watch or clock, which drives the hand but permits it to be moved in setting. Cannon proof, impenetrable by cannon balls. Cannon shot. (a) A cannon ball. (b) The range of a cannon.
Cannon lock
Cannon Can"non, n.; pl. Cannons, collectively Cannon. [F. cannon, fr. L. canna reed, pipe, tube. See Cane.] 1. A great gun; a piece of ordnance or artillery; a firearm for discharging heavy shot with great force. Note: Cannons are made of various materials, as iron, brass, bronze, and steel, and of various sizes and shapes with respect to the special service for which they are intended, as intended, as siege, seacoast, naval, field, or mountain, guns. They always aproach more or less nearly to a cylindrical from, being usually thicker toward the breech than at the muzzle. Formerly they were cast hollow, afterwards they were cast, solid, and bored out. The cannon now most in use for the armament of war vessels and for seacoast defense consists of a forged steel tube reinforced with massive steel rings shrunk upon it. Howitzers and mortars are sometimes called cannon. See Gun. 2. (Mech.) A hollow cylindrical piece carried by a revolving shaft, on which it may, however, revolve independently. 3. (Printing.) A kind of type. See Canon. Cannon ball, strictly, a round solid missile of stone or iron made to be fired from a cannon, but now often applied to a missile of any shape, whether solid or hollow, made for cannon. Elongated and cylindrical missiles are sometimes called bolts; hollow ones charged with explosives are properly called shells. Cannon bullet, a cannon ball. [Obs.] Cannon cracker, a fire cracker of large size. Cannon lock, a device for firing a cannon by a percussion primer. Cannon metal. See Gun Metal. Cannon pinion, the pinion on the minute hand arbor of a watch or clock, which drives the hand but permits it to be moved in setting. Cannon proof, impenetrable by cannon balls. Cannon shot. (a) A cannon ball. (b) The range of a cannon.
Cannon metal
Cannon Can"non, n.; pl. Cannons, collectively Cannon. [F. cannon, fr. L. canna reed, pipe, tube. See Cane.] 1. A great gun; a piece of ordnance or artillery; a firearm for discharging heavy shot with great force. Note: Cannons are made of various materials, as iron, brass, bronze, and steel, and of various sizes and shapes with respect to the special service for which they are intended, as intended, as siege, seacoast, naval, field, or mountain, guns. They always aproach more or less nearly to a cylindrical from, being usually thicker toward the breech than at the muzzle. Formerly they were cast hollow, afterwards they were cast, solid, and bored out. The cannon now most in use for the armament of war vessels and for seacoast defense consists of a forged steel tube reinforced with massive steel rings shrunk upon it. Howitzers and mortars are sometimes called cannon. See Gun. 2. (Mech.) A hollow cylindrical piece carried by a revolving shaft, on which it may, however, revolve independently. 3. (Printing.) A kind of type. See Canon. Cannon ball, strictly, a round solid missile of stone or iron made to be fired from a cannon, but now often applied to a missile of any shape, whether solid or hollow, made for cannon. Elongated and cylindrical missiles are sometimes called bolts; hollow ones charged with explosives are properly called shells. Cannon bullet, a cannon ball. [Obs.] Cannon cracker, a fire cracker of large size. Cannon lock, a device for firing a cannon by a percussion primer. Cannon metal. See Gun Metal. Cannon pinion, the pinion on the minute hand arbor of a watch or clock, which drives the hand but permits it to be moved in setting. Cannon proof, impenetrable by cannon balls. Cannon shot. (a) A cannon ball. (b) The range of a cannon.
Cannon pinion
Cannon Can"non, n.; pl. Cannons, collectively Cannon. [F. cannon, fr. L. canna reed, pipe, tube. See Cane.] 1. A great gun; a piece of ordnance or artillery; a firearm for discharging heavy shot with great force. Note: Cannons are made of various materials, as iron, brass, bronze, and steel, and of various sizes and shapes with respect to the special service for which they are intended, as intended, as siege, seacoast, naval, field, or mountain, guns. They always aproach more or less nearly to a cylindrical from, being usually thicker toward the breech than at the muzzle. Formerly they were cast hollow, afterwards they were cast, solid, and bored out. The cannon now most in use for the armament of war vessels and for seacoast defense consists of a forged steel tube reinforced with massive steel rings shrunk upon it. Howitzers and mortars are sometimes called cannon. See Gun. 2. (Mech.) A hollow cylindrical piece carried by a revolving shaft, on which it may, however, revolve independently. 3. (Printing.) A kind of type. See Canon. Cannon ball, strictly, a round solid missile of stone or iron made to be fired from a cannon, but now often applied to a missile of any shape, whether solid or hollow, made for cannon. Elongated and cylindrical missiles are sometimes called bolts; hollow ones charged with explosives are properly called shells. Cannon bullet, a cannon ball. [Obs.] Cannon cracker, a fire cracker of large size. Cannon lock, a device for firing a cannon by a percussion primer. Cannon metal. See Gun Metal. Cannon pinion, the pinion on the minute hand arbor of a watch or clock, which drives the hand but permits it to be moved in setting. Cannon proof, impenetrable by cannon balls. Cannon shot. (a) A cannon ball. (b) The range of a cannon.
Cannon proof
Cannon Can"non, n.; pl. Cannons, collectively Cannon. [F. cannon, fr. L. canna reed, pipe, tube. See Cane.] 1. A great gun; a piece of ordnance or artillery; a firearm for discharging heavy shot with great force. Note: Cannons are made of various materials, as iron, brass, bronze, and steel, and of various sizes and shapes with respect to the special service for which they are intended, as intended, as siege, seacoast, naval, field, or mountain, guns. They always aproach more or less nearly to a cylindrical from, being usually thicker toward the breech than at the muzzle. Formerly they were cast hollow, afterwards they were cast, solid, and bored out. The cannon now most in use for the armament of war vessels and for seacoast defense consists of a forged steel tube reinforced with massive steel rings shrunk upon it. Howitzers and mortars are sometimes called cannon. See Gun. 2. (Mech.) A hollow cylindrical piece carried by a revolving shaft, on which it may, however, revolve independently. 3. (Printing.) A kind of type. See Canon. Cannon ball, strictly, a round solid missile of stone or iron made to be fired from a cannon, but now often applied to a missile of any shape, whether solid or hollow, made for cannon. Elongated and cylindrical missiles are sometimes called bolts; hollow ones charged with explosives are properly called shells. Cannon bullet, a cannon ball. [Obs.] Cannon cracker, a fire cracker of large size. Cannon lock, a device for firing a cannon by a percussion primer. Cannon metal. See Gun Metal. Cannon pinion, the pinion on the minute hand arbor of a watch or clock, which drives the hand but permits it to be moved in setting. Cannon proof, impenetrable by cannon balls. Cannon shot. (a) A cannon ball. (b) The range of a cannon.
Cannon shot
Cannon Can"non, n.; pl. Cannons, collectively Cannon. [F. cannon, fr. L. canna reed, pipe, tube. See Cane.] 1. A great gun; a piece of ordnance or artillery; a firearm for discharging heavy shot with great force. Note: Cannons are made of various materials, as iron, brass, bronze, and steel, and of various sizes and shapes with respect to the special service for which they are intended, as intended, as siege, seacoast, naval, field, or mountain, guns. They always aproach more or less nearly to a cylindrical from, being usually thicker toward the breech than at the muzzle. Formerly they were cast hollow, afterwards they were cast, solid, and bored out. The cannon now most in use for the armament of war vessels and for seacoast defense consists of a forged steel tube reinforced with massive steel rings shrunk upon it. Howitzers and mortars are sometimes called cannon. See Gun. 2. (Mech.) A hollow cylindrical piece carried by a revolving shaft, on which it may, however, revolve independently. 3. (Printing.) A kind of type. See Canon. Cannon ball, strictly, a round solid missile of stone or iron made to be fired from a cannon, but now often applied to a missile of any shape, whether solid or hollow, made for cannon. Elongated and cylindrical missiles are sometimes called bolts; hollow ones charged with explosives are properly called shells. Cannon bullet, a cannon ball. [Obs.] Cannon cracker, a fire cracker of large size. Cannon lock, a device for firing a cannon by a percussion primer. Cannon metal. See Gun Metal. Cannon pinion, the pinion on the minute hand arbor of a watch or clock, which drives the hand but permits it to be moved in setting. Cannon proof, impenetrable by cannon balls. Cannon shot. (a) A cannon ball. (b) The range of a cannon.
Canon bone
Canon bone Can"on bone` [F. canon, fr. L. canon a rule. See canon.] (Anat.) The shank bone, or great bone above the fetlock, in the fore and hind legs of the horse and allied animals, corresponding to the middle metacarpal or metatarsal bone of most mammals. See Horse.
Canon of the Mass
Mass Mass, n. [OE. masse, messe, AS. m[ae]sse. LL. missa, from L. mittere, missum, to send, dismiss: cf. F. messe. In the ancient churches, the public services at which the catechumens were permitted to be present were called missa catechumenorum, ending with the reading of the Gospel. Then they were dismissed with these words : ``Ite, missa est' [sc. ecclesia], the congregation is dismissed. After that the sacrifice proper began. At its close the same words were said to those who remained. So the word gave the name of Mass to the sacrifice in the Catholic Church. See Missile, and cf. Christmas, Lammas, Mess a dish, Missal.] 1. (R. C. Ch.) The sacrifice in the sacrament of the Eucharist, or the consecration and oblation of the host. 2. (Mus.) The portions of the Mass usually set to music, considered as a musical composition; -- namely, the Kyrie, the Gloria, the Credo, the Sanctus, and the Agnus Dei, besides sometimes an Offertory and the Benedictus. Canon of the Mass. See Canon. High Mass, Mass with incense, music, the assistance of a deacon, subdeacon, etc. Low Mass, Mass which is said by the priest through-out, without music. Mass bell, the sanctus bell. See Sanctus. Mass book, the missal or Roman Catholic service book.
Non assumpsit
Non assumpsit Non` as*sump"sit [L., he did not undertake.] (Law) The general plea or denial in an action of assumpsit.
Non compos
Non compos Non com"pos Non compos mentis Non com"pos men"tis [L.] Not of sound mind; not having the regular use of reason; hence, also, as a noun, an idiot; a lunatic; one devoid of reason, either by nature or from accident.
Non compos mentis
Non compos Non com"pos Non compos mentis Non com"pos men"tis [L.] Not of sound mind; not having the regular use of reason; hence, also, as a noun, an idiot; a lunatic; one devoid of reason, either by nature or from accident.
Non est factum
Non est factum Non` est` fac"tum [Law L. it is not (his) deed.] (Law) The plea of the general issue in an action of debt on bond.
Non est inventus
Non est inventus Non` est` in*ven"tus [L., he is not found.] (Law) The return of a sheriff on a writ, when the defendant is not found in his county. --Bouvier.
Non liquet
Non liquet Non` li"quet [L.] It is not clear; -- a verdict given by a jury when a matter is to be deferred to another day of trial.
Non obstante
Non obstante Non` ob*stan"te [L.] 1. Notwithstanding; in opposition to, or in spite of, what has been stated, or is to be stated or admitted. 2. (Law) A clause in old English statutes and letters patent, importing a license from the crown to do a thing notwithstanding any statute to the contrary. This dispensing power was abolished by the Bill of Rights. In this very reign [Henry III.] the practice of dispensing with statutes by a non obstante was introduced. --Hallam. Non obstante veredicto [LL.] (Law), a judgment sometimes entered by order of the court, for the plaintiff, notwithstanding a verdict for the defendant. --Stephen.
Non obstante veredicto
Non obstante Non` ob*stan"te [L.] 1. Notwithstanding; in opposition to, or in spite of, what has been stated, or is to be stated or admitted. 2. (Law) A clause in old English statutes and letters patent, importing a license from the crown to do a thing notwithstanding any statute to the contrary. This dispensing power was abolished by the Bill of Rights. In this very reign [Henry III.] the practice of dispensing with statutes by a non obstante was introduced. --Hallam. Non obstante veredicto [LL.] (Law), a judgment sometimes entered by order of the court, for the plaintiff, notwithstanding a verdict for the defendant. --Stephen.
Non pros
Non pros Non" pros.` An abbreviation of Non prosequitur.
Non prosequitur
Non prosequitur Non" pro*seq"ui*tur [L. he does not prosecute.] (Law) A judgment entered against the plaintiff in a suit where he does not appear to prosecute. See Nolle prosequi.
Non sequitur
Non sequitur Non seq"ui*tur [L., it does not follow.] (Logic) An inference which does not follow from the premises.
Tenon saw
Tenon Ten"on, n. [F., fr. tenir to hold. See Tenable.] (Carp. & Join.) A projecting member left by cutting away the wood around it, and made to insert into a mortise, and in this way secure together the parts of a frame; especially, such a member when it passes entirely through the thickness of the piece in which the mortise is cut, and shows on the other side. Cf. Tooth, Tusk. Tenon saw, a saw with a thin blade, usually stiffened by a brass or steel back, for cutting tenons. [Corruptly written tenant saw.] --Gwilt.

Meaning of Non from wikipedia

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- Non-binary or gender**** is an umbrella term for gender identities that are not solely male or female‍—‌identities that are outside the gender binary...
- Non sequitur may refer to: Non sequitur (fallacy), an invalid argument whose conclusion is not supported by its premises Non sequitur (literary device)...
- A nonprofit organization (NPO), also known as a non-business entity, not-for-profit organization, or nonprofit institution, is a legal entity organized...
- A non-government organization (NGO) is an organization that generally is formed independent from government. They are typically nonprofit entities, and...
- The Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) is a forum of 120 countries that are not formally aligned with or against any major power bloc. After the United Nations...
- Non-monogamy (or nonmonogamy) is an umbrella term for every practice or philosophy of non-dyadic intimate relationship that does not strictly hew to the...
- physics, non-Archimedean refers to something without the Archimedean property. This includes: Ultrametric space notably, p-adic numbers Non-Archimedean...
- Non-fermenters (also non-fermenting bacteria) are a taxonomically heterogeneous group of bacteria of the phylum Pseudomonadota that cannot catabolize glucose...