Definition of Mexica. Meaning of Mexica. Synonyms of Mexica

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Mexica. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Mexica and, of course, Mexica synonyms and on the right images related to the word Mexica.

Definition of Mexica

No result for Mexica. Showing similar results...

Amblystoma Mexicanum
Siredon Si*re"don, n. [NL., from Gr. ??? a siren.] (Zo["o]l.) The larval form of any salamander while it still has external gills; especially, one of those which, like the axolotl (Amblystoma Mexicanum), sometimes lay eggs while in this larval state, but which under more favorable conditions lose their gills and become normal salamanders. See also Axolotl.
Argemone Mexicana
Mexican Mex"i*can, a. Of or pertaining to Mexico or its people. -- n. A native or inhabitant of Mexico. Mexican poppy (Bot.), a tropical American herb of the Poppy family (Argemone Mexicana) with much the look of a thistle, but having large yellow or white blossoms. Mexican tea (Bot.), an aromatic kind of pigweed from tropical America (Chenopodium ambrosioides).
Argemone Mexicana
Poppy Pop"py, n.; pl. Poppies. [OE. popy, AS. popig, L. papaver.] (Bot.) Any plant or species of the genus Papaver, herbs with showy polypetalous flowers and a milky juice. From one species (Papaver somniferum) opium is obtained, though all the species contain it to some extent; also, a flower of the plant. See Illust. of Capsule. California poppy (Bot.), any yellow-flowered plant of the genus Eschscholtzia. Corn poppy. See under Corn. Horn, or Horned, poppy. See under Horn. Poppy bee (Zo["o]l.), a leaf-cutting bee (Anthocopa papaveris) which uses pieces cut from poppy petals for the lining of its cells; -- called also upholsterer bee. Prickly poppy (Bot.), Argemone Mexicana, a yellow-flowered plant of the Poppy family, but as prickly as a thistle. Poppy seed, the seed the opium poppy (P. somniferum). Spatling poppy (Bot.), a species of Silene (S. inflata). See Catchfly.
C Mexicanus
Water ousel Wa"ter ou"sel, Water ouzel Wa"ter ou"zel . (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of small insessorial birds of the genus Cinclus (or Hydrobates), especially the European water ousel (C. aquaticus), and the American water ousel (C. Mexicanus). These birds live about the water, and are in the habit of walking on the bottom of streams beneath the water in search of food.
C Mexicanus
Ousel Ou"sel, n. [OE. osel, AS. ?sle; akin to G. amsel, OHG. amsala, and perh. to L. merula blackbird. Cf. Merle, Amsel.] (Zo["o]l.) One of several species of European thrushes, especially the blackbird (Merula merula, or Turdus merula), and the mountain or ring ousel (Turdus torquatus). [Written also ouzel.] Rock ousel (Zo["o]l.), the ring ousel. Water ousel (Zo["o]l.), the European dipper (Cinclus aquaticus), and the American dipper (C. Mexicanus).
Covillea mexicana
Creosote bush Cre"o*sote bush A shrub (Covillea mexicana) found in desert regions from Colorado to California and southward through Mexico. It has yellow flowers and very resinous foliage with a strong odor of creosote.
Falco Mexicanus
Prairie Prai"rie, n. [F., an extensive meadow, OF. praerie, LL. prataria, fr. L. pratum a meadow.] 1. An extensive tract of level or rolling land, destitute of trees, covered with coarse grass, and usually characterized by a deep, fertile soil. They abound throughout the Mississippi valley, between the Alleghanies and the Rocky mountains. From the forests and the prairies, From the great lakes of the northland. --Longfellow. 2. A meadow or tract of grass; especially, a so called natural meadow. Prairie chicken (Zo["o]l.), any American grouse of the genus Tympanuchus, especially T. Americanus (formerly T. cupido), which inhabits the prairies of the central United States. Applied also to the sharp-tailed grouse. Prairie clover (Bot.), any plant of the leguminous genus Petalostemon, having small rosy or white flowers in dense terminal heads or spikes. Several species occur in the prairies of the United States. Prairie dock (Bot.), a coarse composite plant (Silphium terebinthaceum) with large rough leaves and yellow flowers, found in the Western prairies. Prairie dog (Zo["o]l.), a small American rodent (Cynomys Ludovicianus) allied to the marmots. It inhabits the plains west of the Mississippi. The prairie dogs burrow in the ground in large warrens, and have a sharp bark like that of a dog. Called also prairie marmot. Prairie grouse. Same as Prairie chicken, above. Prairie hare (Zo["o]l.), a large long-eared Western hare (Lepus campestris). See Jack rabbit, under 2d Jack. Prairie hawk, Prairie falcon (Zo["o]l.), a falcon of Western North America (Falco Mexicanus). The upper parts are brown. The tail has transverse bands of white; the under parts, longitudinal streaks and spots of brown. Prairie hen. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Prairie chicken, above. Prairie itch (Med.), an affection of the skin attended with intense itching, which is observed in the Northern and Western United States; -- also called swamp itch, winter itch. Prairie marmot. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Prairie dog, above. Prairie mole (Zo["o]l.), a large American mole (Scalops argentatus), native of the Western prairies. Prairie pigeon, plover, or snipe (Zo["o]l.), the upland plover. See Plover, n., 2. Prairie rattlesnake (Zo["o]l.), the massasauga. Prairie snake (Zo["o]l.), a large harmless American snake (Masticophis flavigularis). It is pale yellow, tinged with brown above. Prairie squirrel (Zo["o]l.), any American ground squirrel of the genus Spermophilus, inhabiting prairies; -- called also gopher. Prairie turnip (Bot.), the edible turnip-shaped farinaceous root of a leguminous plant (Psoralea esculenta) of the Upper Missouri region; also, the plant itself. Called also pomme blanche, and pomme de prairie. Prairie warbler (Zo["o]l.), a bright-colored American warbler (Dendroica discolor). The back is olive yellow, with a group of reddish spots in the middle; the under parts and the parts around the eyes are bright yellow; the sides of the throat and spots along the sides, black; three outer tail feathers partly white. Prairie wolf. (Zo["o]l.) See Coyote.
G Mexicana
Crane Crane (kr[=a]n), n. [AS. cran; akin to D. & LG. craan, G. kranich, krahn (this in sense 2), Gr. ge`ranos, L. grus, W. & Armor. garan, OSlav. zerav[i^], Lith. gerve, Icel. trani, Sw. trana, Dan. trane. [root]24. Cf. Geranium.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) A wading bird of the genus Grus, and allied genera, of various species, having a long, straight bill, and long legs and neck. Note: The common European crane is Grus cinerea. The sand-hill crane (G. Mexicana) and the whooping crane (G. Americana) are large American species. The Balearic or crowned crane is Balearica pavonina. The name is sometimes erroneously applied to the herons and cormorants. 2. A machine for raising and lowering heavy weights, and, while holding them suspended, transporting them through a limited lateral distance. In one form it consists of a projecting arm or jib of timber or iron, a rotating post or base, and the necessary tackle, windlass, etc.; -- so called from a fancied similarity between its arm and the neck of a crane See Illust. of Derrick. 3. An iron arm with horizontal motion, attached to the side or back of a fireplace, for supporting kettles, etc., over a fire. 4. A siphon, or bent pipe, for drawing liquors out of a cask. 5. (Naut.) A forked post or projecting bracket to support spars, etc., -- generally used in pairs. See Crotch, 2. Crane fly (Zo["o]l.), a dipterous insect with long legs, of the genus Tipula. Derrick crane. See Derrick. Gigantic crane. (Zo["o]l.) See Adjutant, n., 3. Traveling crane, Traveler crane, Traversing crane (Mach.), a crane mounted on wheels; esp., an overhead crane consisting of a crab or other hoisting apparatus traveling on rails or beams fixed overhead, as in a machine shop or foundry. Water crane, a kind of hydrant with a long swinging spout, for filling locomotive tenders, water carts, etc., with water.
Geomys Mexicanus
Tucan Tu*can", n. (Zo["o]l.) The Mexican pocket gopher (Geomys Mexicanus). It resembles the common pocket gopher of the Western United States, but is larger. Called also tugan, and tuza.
Grus Mexicana
Sand grouse (Zo["o]l.), any one of many species of Old World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both grouse and pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga. They mostly belong to the genus Pterocles, as the common Indian species (P. exustus). The large sand grouse (P. arenarius), the painted sand grouse (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P. alchata) are also found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. Sand hill, a hill of sand; a dune. Sand-hill crane (Zo["o]l.), the American brown crane (Grus Mexicana). Sand hopper (Zo["o]l.), a beach flea; an orchestian. Sand hornet (Zo["o]l.), a sand wasp. Sand lark. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of India. (b) A small sandpiper, or plover, as the ringneck, the sanderling, and the common European sandpiper. (c) The Australian red-capped dotterel ([AE]gialophilus ruficapillus); -- called also red-necked plover. Sand launce (Zo["o]l.), a lant, or launce. Sand lizard (Zo["o]l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). Sand martin (Zo["o]l.), the bank swallow. Sand mole (Zo["o]l.), the coast rat. Sand monitor (Zo["o]l.), a large Egyptian lizard (Monitor arenarius) which inhabits dry localities. Sand mouse (Zo["o]l.), the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under Myrtle. Sand partridge (Zo["o]l.), either of two small Asiatic partridges of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The other species (A. Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also seesee partridge, and teehoo. Sand picture, a picture made by putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. Sand pike. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. Sand pillar, a sand storm which takes the form of a whirling pillar in its progress in desert tracts like those of the Sahara and Mongolia. Sand pipe (Geol.), a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in depth, occurring especially in calcareous rocks, and often filled with gravel, sand, etc.; -- called also sand gall. Sand pride (Zo["o]l.), a small British lamprey now considered to be the young of larger species; -- called also sand prey. Sand pump, in artesian well boring, a long, slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for raising sand from the well. Sand rat (Zo["o]l.), the pocket gopher. Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. Sand runner (Zo["o]l.), the turnstone. Sand saucer (Zo["o]l.), the mass of egg capsules, or o["o]thec[ae], of any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera. It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand; -- called also sand collar. Sand screw (Zo["o]l.), an amphipod crustacean (Lepidactylis arenarius), which burrows in the sandy seabeaches of Europe and America. Sand shark (Zo["o]l.), an American shark (Odontaspis littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of the Eastern United States; -- called also gray shark, and dogfish shark. See Illust. under Remora. Sand skink (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as, the ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. Sand skipper (Zo["o]l.), a beach flea, or orchestian. Sand smelt (Zo["o]l.), a silverside. Sand snake. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native of Southern Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. jaculus of India and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African snake of the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. Sand snipe (Zo["o]l.), the sandpiper. Sand star (Zo["o]l.), an ophiurioid starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. Sand storm, a cloud of sand driven violently by the wind. Sand sucker, the sandnecker. Sand swallow (Zo["o]l.), the bank swallow. See under Bank. Sand tube, a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of vitrified sand, produced by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b) (Zo["o]l.) Any tube made of cemented sand. (c) (Zo["o]l.) In starfishes, a tube having calcareous particles in its wall, which connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. Sand viper. (Zo["o]l.) See Hognose snake. Sand wasp (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of hymenopterous insects belonging to the families Pompilid[ae] and Spherid[ae], which dig burrows in sand. The female provisions the nest with insects or spiders which she paralyzes by stinging, and which serve as food for her young.
Himantopus Mexicanus
Stilt Stilt, n. [OE. stilte; akin to Dan. stylte, Sw. stylta, LG. & D. stelt, OHG. stelza, G. stelze, and perh. to E. stout.] 1. A pole, or piece of wood, constructed with a step or loop to raise the foot above the ground in walking. It is sometimes lashed to the leg, and sometimes prolonged upward so as to be steadied by the hand or arm. Ambition is but avarice on stilts, and masked. --Landor. 2. A crutch; also, the handle of a plow. [Prov. Eng.] --Halliwell. 3. (Zo["o]l.) Any species of limicoline birds belonging to Himantopus and allied genera, in which the legs are remarkably long and slender. Called also longshanks, stiltbird, stilt plover, and lawyer. Note: The American species (Himantopus Mexicanus) is well known. The European and Asiatic stilt (H. candidus) is usually white, except the wings and interscapulars, which are greenish black. The white-headed stilt (H. leucocephalus) and the banded stilt (Cladorhynchus pectoralis) are found in Australia. Stilt plover (Zo["o]l.), the stilt. Stilt sandpiper (Zo["o]l.), an American sandpiper (Micropalama himantopus) having long legs. The bill is somewhat expanded at the tip.
Mexical
Mexal Mex*al", Mexical Mex"i*cal, n. [Sp. mexcal.] See Mescal.
Mexican
Mexican Mex"i*can, a. Of or pertaining to Mexico or its people. -- n. A native or inhabitant of Mexico. Mexican poppy (Bot.), a tropical American herb of the Poppy family (Argemone Mexicana) with much the look of a thistle, but having large yellow or white blossoms. Mexican tea (Bot.), an aromatic kind of pigweed from tropical America (Chenopodium ambrosioides).
Mexican coca
Coca Co"ca, n. [Sp., fr. native name.] The dried leaf of a South American shrub (Erythroxylon Coca). In med., called Erythroxylon. Note: Coca leaves resemble tea leaves in size, shape, and odor, and are chewed (with an alkali) by natives of Peru and Bolivia to impart vigor in prolonged exertion, or to sustain strength in absence of food. Mexican coca, an American herb (Richardsonia scabra), yielding a nutritious fodder. Its roots are used as a substitute for ipecacuanha.
Mexican lac
, a scale-shaped insect, the female of which fixes herself on the bark, and exudes from the margin of her body this resinous substance. Note: Stick-lac is the substance in its natural state, incrusting small twigs. When broken off, and the coloring matter partly removed, the granular residuum is called seed-lac. When melted, and reduced to a thin crust, it is called shell-lac or shellac. Lac is an important ingredient in sealing wax, dyes, varnishes, and lacquers. Ceylon lac, a resinous exudation of the tree Croton lacciferum, resembling lac. Lac dye, a scarlet dye obtained from stick-lac. Lac lake, the coloring matter of lac dye when precipitated from its solutions by alum. Mexican lac, an exudation of the tree Croton Draco.
Mexican poppy
Mexican Mex"i*can, a. Of or pertaining to Mexico or its people. -- n. A native or inhabitant of Mexico. Mexican poppy (Bot.), a tropical American herb of the Poppy family (Argemone Mexicana) with much the look of a thistle, but having large yellow or white blossoms. Mexican tea (Bot.), an aromatic kind of pigweed from tropical America (Chenopodium ambrosioides).
Mexican tea
Mexican Mex"i*can, a. Of or pertaining to Mexico or its people. -- n. A native or inhabitant of Mexico. Mexican poppy (Bot.), a tropical American herb of the Poppy family (Argemone Mexicana) with much the look of a thistle, but having large yellow or white blossoms. Mexican tea (Bot.), an aromatic kind of pigweed from tropical America (Chenopodium ambrosioides).
Mexican tiger
Tiger Ti"ger, n. [OE. tigre, F. tigre, L. tigris, Gr. ti`gris; probably of Persian origin; cf. Zend tighra pointed, tighri an arrow, Per. t[=i]r; perhaps akin to E. stick, v.t.; -- probably so named from its quickness.] 1. A very large and powerful carnivore (Felis tigris) native of Southern Asia and the East Indies. Its back and sides are tawny or rufous yellow, transversely striped with black, the tail is ringed with black, the throat and belly are nearly white. When full grown, it equals or exceeds the lion in size and strength. Called also royal tiger, and Bengal tiger. 2. Fig.: A ferocious, bloodthirsty person. As for heinous tiger, Tamora. --Shak. 3. A servant in livery, who rides with his master or mistress. --Dickens. 4. A kind of growl or screech, after cheering; as, three cheers and a tiger. [Colloq. U. S.] 5. A pneumatic box or pan used in refining sugar. American tiger. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The puma. (b) The jaguar. Clouded tiger (Zo["o]l.), a handsome striped and spotted carnivore (Felis macrocelis or F. marmorata) native of the East Indies and Southern Asia. Its body is about three and a half feet long, and its tail about three feet long. Its ground color is brownish gray, and the dark markings are irregular stripes, spots, and rings, but there are always two dark bands on the face, one extending back from the eye, and one from the angle of the mouth. Called also tortoise-shell tiger. Mexican tiger (Zo["o]l.), the jaguar. Tiger beetle (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of active carnivorous beetles of the family Cicindelid[ae]. They usually inhabit dry or sandy places, and fly rapidly. Tiger bittern. (Zo["o]l.) See Sun bittern, under Sun. Tiger cat (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of wild cats of moderate size with dark transverse bars or stripes somewhat resembling those of the tiger. Tiger flower (Bot.), an iridaceous plant of the genus Tigridia (as T. conchiflora, T. grandiflora, etc.) having showy flowers, spotted or streaked somewhat like the skin of a tiger. Tiger grass (Bot.), a low East Indian fan palm (Cham[ae]rops Ritchieana). It is used in many ways by the natives. --J. Smith (Dict. Econ. Plants). Tiger lily. (Bot.) See under Lily. Tiger moth (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of moths of the family Arctiad[ae] which are striped or barred with black and white or with other conspicuous colors. The larv[ae] are called woolly bears. Tiger shark (Zo["o]l.), a voracious shark (Galeocerdo maculatus or tigrinus) more or less barred or spotted with yellow. It is found in both the Atlantic and Indian Ocean. Called also zebra shark. Tiger shell (Zo["o]l.), a large and conspicuously spotted cowrie (Cypr[ae]a tigris); -- so called from its fancied resemblance to a tiger in color and markings. Called also tiger cowrie. Tiger wolf (Zo["o]l.), the spotted hyena (Hy[ae]na crocuta). Tiger wood, the variegated heartwood of a tree (Mach[ae]rium Schomburgkii) found in Guiana.
Mexicanize
Mexicanize Mex"i*can*ize, v. t. To cause to be like the Mexicans, or their country, esp. in respect of frequent revolutions of government.
Mexicanize
Mexicanize Mex"i*can*ize, v. i. To become like the Mexicans, or their country or government.
Mugil cephalus or Mexicanus
Macho Ma"cho, n. [Sp.] (Zo["o]l.) The striped mullet of California (Mugil cephalus, or Mexicanus).

Meaning of Mexica from wikipedia

- The Mexica (Nahuatl: Mēxihcah, Nahuatl pronunciation: [meːˈʃiʔkaʔ] (listen) (singular Mēxihcatl [meːˈʃiʔkat͡ɬ]) or Mexicas were a Nahuatl-speaking indigenous...
- (Chapoltepēc, "in the hill of gr****hoppers"). The Mexica served as mercenaries for Culhuacan. After the Mexica served Culhuacan in battle, the ruler appointed...
- three city-states established in 1427, Tenochtitlan, city-state of the Mexica or Tenochca; Texcoco; and Tlacopan, previously part of the Tepanec empire...
- The Mexica were a pre-Columbian people of central Mexico, though some would think it was the more feminine cognate of the country name. Mexica may also...
- The Aztec or Mexica calendar is the calendar system that was used by the Aztecs as well as other Pre-Columbian peoples of central Mexico. It is one of...
- are different accounts of their origin. In the myth the ancestors of the Mexica/Aztec came from a place in the north called Aztlan, the last of seven nahuatlacas...
- Aztecs' indigenous enemies and rivals. They combined forces to defeat the Mexica of Tenochtitlan over a two-year period. For the Spanish, the expedition...
- tenoːt͡ʃˈtit͡ɬan]; Spanish: Tenochtitlán or México-Tenochtitlan) was a large Mexica city-state in what is now the center of Mexico City. Founded on June 20...
- Flower WarBelligerents Mexica Empire Tlaxcala Cholula Huejotzingo Atlixco...
- The Mexica Movement is an "Indigenous rights educational organization" based in Los Angeles, California. Their organization views Mexicans of Native Mexican...
Loading...