Definition of Melpomene. Meaning of Melpomene. Synonyms of Melpomene

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Melpomene. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Melpomene and, of course, Melpomene synonyms and on the right images related to the word Melpomene.

Definition of Melpomene

Melpomene
Melpomene Mel*pom"e*ne, n. [L., fr. Gr. ?, lit., the songstress, fr. ?, ?, to sing.] 1. (Class. Myth.) The Muse of tragedy. 2. (Astron.) The eighteenth asteroid.

Meaning of Melpomene from wikipedia

- In Gr**** mythology, Melpomene (/mɛlˈpɒmɪniː/; Ancient Gr****: Μελπομένη, romanized: Melpoménē, lit. 'to sing' or 'the one that is melodious'), initially...
- Heliconius melpomene, the postman butterfly, common postman or simply postman, is a brightly colored butterfly found throughout Central and South America...
- Melpomene (minor planet designation: 18 Melpomene) is a large, bright main-belt asteroid that was discovered by J. R. Hind on June 24, 1852, and named...
- refer to: 18 Melpomene, a main belt asteroid. HMS Melpomene, seven ships of the Royal Navy. Melpomene (plant), a genus of polypod fern. Melpomene (spider)...
- Melpomene is a genus of ferns in the family Polypodiaceae, subfamily Grammitidoideae, according to the Pteridophyte Phylogeny Group cl****ification of...
- wore a thin soled shoe called a sock (Latin soccus). Buskins The soccus Melpomene, the muse of tragedy, is often depicted holding the tragic mask and wearing...
- The Melpomene Projects, officially called the Gustavo Apartments, is located in Central City New Orleans and is one of the Housing Projects of New Orleans...
- (history) Euterpe (flutes and music) Thalia (comedy and pastoral poetry) Melpomene (tragedy) Terpsic**** (dance) Erato (love poetry and lyric poetry) Polyhymnia...
- name Melpomène, in honour of the muse Melpomene. Melpomène (1792), a 40-gun Minerve-cl**** frigate Melpomène (1812), a 44-gun Pallas-cl**** Melpomène (1828)...
- Melpomene is a genus of funnel weavers first described by O. ****rd-Cambridge in 1898. They range from southwestern U.S. (southern Arizona to western...
Loading...