Definition of Marsh. Meaning of Marsh. Synonyms of Marsh

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Definition of Marsh

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Archmarshal
Archmarshal Arch`mar"shal, n. [G. erzmarschall. See Arch-, pref.] The grand marshal of the old German empire, a dignity that to the Elector of Saxony.
Dismarshal
Dismarshal Dis*mar"shal, v. t. To disarrange; to derange; to put in disorder. [R.] --Drummond.
fresh-water marshhen
Rail Rail, n. [F. r[^a]le, fr. r[^a]ler to have a rattling in the throat; of German origin, and akin to E. rattle. See Rattle, v.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of limicoline birds of the family Rallid[ae], especially those of the genus Rallus, and of closely allied genera. They are prized as game birds. Note: The common European water rail (Rallus aquaticus) is called also bilcock, skitty coot, and brook runner. The best known American species are the clapper rail, or salt-marsh hen (Rallus lonqirostris, var. crepitans); the king, or red-breasted, rail (R. elegans) (called also fresh-water marshhen); the lesser clapper, or Virginia, rail (R. Virginianus); and the Carolina, or sora, rail (Porzana Carolina). See Sora. Land rail (Zo["o]l.), the corncrake.
Knight marshal
Knight marshal Knight" mar"shal (Eng. Law) An officer in the household of the British sovereign, who has cognizance of transgressions within the royal household and verge, and of contracts made there, a member of the household being one of the parties. --Wharton.
Marechal or Marshal Niel
Noisette Noi*sette", n. (Bot.) A hybrid rose produced in 1817, by a French gardener, Noisette, of Charleston, South Carolina, from the China rose and the musk rose. It has given rise to many fine varieties, as the Lamarque, the Marechal (or Marshal) Niel, and the Cloth of gold. Most roses of this class have clustered flowers and are of vigorous growth. --P. Henderson.
marsh blackbird
Redwing Red"wing` (-w?ng`), n. (Zo["o]l.) A European thrush (Turdus iliacus). Its under wing coverts are orange red. Called also redwinged thrush. (b) A North American passerine bird (Agelarius ph[oe]niceus) of the family Icterid[ae]. The male is black, with a conspicuous patch of bright red, bordered with orange, on each wing. Called also redwinged blackbird, red-winged troupial, marsh blackbird, and swamp blackbird.
Marsh cinquefoil
Cinquefoil Cinque"foil`, n. [Cinque five + foil, F. feuille leaf. See Foil.] 1. (Bot.) The name of several different species of the genus Potentilla; -- also called five-finger, because of the resemblance of its leaves to the fingers of the hand. 2. (Arch.) An ornamental foliation having five points or cups, used in windows, panels, etc. --Gwilt. Marsh cinquefoil, the Potentilla palustris, a plant with purple flowers which grows in fresh-water marshes.
marsh cranberry
Cranberry Cran"ber*ry (kr[a^]n"b[e^]r*r[y^]), n.; pl. Cranberries (-r[i^]z). [So named from its fruit being ripe in the spring when the cranes return. --Dr. Prior.] (Bot.) A red, acid berry, much used for making sauce, etc.; also, the plant producing it (several species of Vaccinum or Oxycoccus.) The high cranberry or cranberry tree is a species of Viburnum (V. Opulus), and the other is sometimes called low cranberry or marsh cranberry to distinguish it.
Marsh elder
Elder El"der, n. [OE. ellern, eller, AS. ellen, cf. LG. elloorn; perh. akin to OHG. holantar, holuntar, G. holunder; or perh. to E. alder, n.] (Bot.) A genus of shrubs (Sambucus) having broad umbels of white flowers, and small black or red berries. Note: The common North American species is Sambucus Canadensis; the common European species (S. nigra) forms a small tree. The red-berried elder is S. pubens. The berries are diaphoretic and aperient. Box elder. See under 1st Box. Dwarf elder. See Danewort. Elder tree. (Bot.) Same as Elder. --Shak. Marsh elder, the cranberry tree Viburnum Opulus).
Marsh gas
Gas fitter, one who lays pipes and puts up fixtures for gas. Gas fitting. (a) The occupation of a gas fitter. (b) pl. The appliances needed for the introduction of gas into a building, as meters, pipes, burners, etc. Gas fixture, a device for conveying illuminating or combustible gas from the pipe to the gas-burner, consisting of an appendage of cast, wrought, or drawn metal, with tubes upon which the burners, keys, etc., are adjusted. Gas generator, an apparatus in which gas is evolved; as: (a) a retort in which volatile hydrocarbons are evolved by heat; (b) a machine in which air is saturated with the vapor of liquid hydrocarbon; a carburetor; (c) a machine for the production of carbonic acid gas, for a["e]rating water, bread, etc. --Knight. Gas jet, a flame of illuminating gas. Gas machine, an apparatus for carbureting air for use as illuminating gas. Gas meter, an instrument for recording the quantity of gas consumed in a given time, at a particular place. Gas retort, a retort which contains the coal and other materials, and in which the gas is generated, in the manufacture of gas. Gas stove, a stove for cooking or other purposes, heated by gas. Gas tar, coal tar. Gas trap, a drain trap; a sewer trap. See 4th Trap, 5. Gas washer (Gas Works), an apparatus within which gas from the condenser is brought in contact with a falling stream of water, to precipitate the tar remaining in it. --Knight. Gas water, water through which gas has been passed for purification; -- called also gas liquor and ammoniacal water, and used for the manufacture of sal ammoniac, carbonate of ammonia, and Prussian blue. --Tomlinson. Gas well, a deep boring, from which natural gas is discharged. --Raymond. Gas works, a manufactory of gas, with all the machinery and appurtenances; a place where gas is generated for lighting cities. Laughing gas. See under Laughing. Marsh gas (Chem.), a light, combustible, gaseous hydrocarbon, CH4, produced artificially by the dry distillation of many organic substances, and occurring as a natural product of decomposition in stagnant pools, whence its name. It is an abundant ingredient of ordinary illuminating gas, and is the first member of the paraffin series. Called also methane, and in coal mines, fire damp. Natural gas, gas obtained from wells, etc., in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and elsewhere, and largely used for fuel and illuminating purposes. It is chiefly derived from the Coal Measures. Olefiant gas (Chem.). See Ethylene. Water gas (Chem.), a kind of gas made by forcing steam over glowing coals, whereby there results a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This gives a gas of intense heating power, but destitute of light-giving properties, and which is charged by passing through some volatile hydrocarbon, as gasoline.
marsh hawk
Hen Hen, n. [AS. henn, hen, h[ae]n; akin to D. hen, OHG. henna, G. henne, Icel. h?na, Dan. h["o]na; the fem. corresponding to AS. hana cock, D. haan, OHG. hano, G. hahn, Icel. hani, Dan. & Sw. hane. Prob. akin to L. canere to sing, and orig. meaning, a singer. Cf. Chanticleer.] (Zo["o]l.) The female of the domestic fowl; also, the female of grouse, pheasants, or any kind of birds; as, the heath hen; the gray hen. Note: Used adjectively or in combination to indicate the female; as, hen canary, hen eagle, hen turkey, peahen. Hen clam. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A clam of the Mactra, and allied genera; the sea clam or surf clam. See Surf clam. (b) A California clam of the genus Pachydesma. Hen driver. See Hen harrier (below). Hen harrier (Zo["o]l.), a hawk (Circus cyaneus), found in Europe and America; -- called also dove hawk, henharm, henharrow, hen driver, and usually, in America, marsh hawk. See Marsh hawk. Hen hawk (Zo["o]l.), one of several species of large hawks which capture hens; esp., the American red-tailed hawk (Buteo borealis), the red-shouldered hawk (B. lineatus), and the goshawk.
marsh ichneumon
Vansire Van"sire, n. [The native name: cf. F. vansire.] (Zo["o]l.) An ichneumon (Herpestes galera) native of Southern Africa and Madagascar. It is reddish brown or dark brown, grizzled with white. Called also vondsira, and marsh ichneumon.
marsh marigold
Marigold Mar"i*gold, n. [Mary + gold.] (Bot.) A name for several plants with golden yellow blossoms, especially the Calendula officinalis (see Calendula), and the cultivated species of Tagetes. Note: There are several yellow-flowered plants of different genera bearing this name; as, the African or French marigold of the genus Tagetes, of which several species and many varieties are found in gardens. They are mostly strong-smelling herbs from South America and Mexico: bur marigold, of the genus Bidens; corn marigold, of the genus Chrysanthemum (C. segetum, a pest in the cornfields of Italy); fig marigold, of the genus Mesembryanthemum; marsh marigold, of the genus Caltha (C. palustris), commonly known in America as the cowslip. See Marsh Marigold. Marigold window. (Arch.) See Rose window, under Rose.
Marsh marigold
Marsh marigold Marsh mar"i*gold (Bot.) A perennial plant of the genus Caltha (C. palustris), growing in wet places and bearing bright yellow flowers. In the United States it is used as a pot herb under the name of cowslip. See Cowslip.
Marsh tern
Tern Tern (t[~e]rn), n. [Dan. terne, t[ae]rne; akin to Sw. t["a]rna, Icel. [thorn]erna; cf. NL. sterna.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of long-winged aquatic birds, allied to the gulls, and belonging to Sterna and various allied genera. Note: Terns differ from gulls chiefly in their graceful form, in their weaker and more slender bills and feet, and their longer and more pointed wings. The tail is usually forked. Most of the species are white with the back and wings pale gray, and often with a dark head. The common European tern (Sterna hirundo) is found also in Asia and America. Among other American species are the arctic tern (S. paradis[ae]a), the roseate tern (S. Dougalli), the least tern (S. Antillarum), the royal tern (S. maxima), and the sooty tern (S. fuliginosa). Hooded tern. See Fairy bird, under Fairy. Marsh tern, any tern of the genus Hydrochelidon. They frequent marshes and rivers and feed largely upon insects. River tern, any tern belonging to Se["e]na or allied genera which frequent rivers. Sea tern, any tern of the genus Thalasseus. Terns of this genus have very long, pointed wings, and chiefly frequent seas and the mouths of large rivers.
Marshal
Marshal Mar"shal, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Marshaledor Marshalled; p. pr. & vb. n. Marshaling or Marshalling.] 1. To dispose in order; to arrange in a suitable manner; as, to marshal troops or an army. And marshaling the heroes of his name As, in their order, next to light they came. --Dryden. 2. To direct, guide, or lead. Thou marshalest me the way that I was going. --Shak. 3. (Her.) To dispose in due order, as the different quarterings on an escutcheon, or the different crests when several belong to an achievement.
Marshal Niel
Marechal Niel Mare"chal Niel" [F.] A kind of large yellow rose. [Written also Marshal Niel.]
Marshaled
Marshal Mar"shal, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Marshaledor Marshalled; p. pr. & vb. n. Marshaling or Marshalling.] 1. To dispose in order; to arrange in a suitable manner; as, to marshal troops or an army. And marshaling the heroes of his name As, in their order, next to light they came. --Dryden. 2. To direct, guide, or lead. Thou marshalest me the way that I was going. --Shak. 3. (Her.) To dispose in due order, as the different quarterings on an escutcheon, or the different crests when several belong to an achievement.
Marshaler
Marshaler Mar"shal*er, n. [Written also marshaller.] One who marshals.
Marshaling
Marshal Mar"shal, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Marshaledor Marshalled; p. pr. & vb. n. Marshaling or Marshalling.] 1. To dispose in order; to arrange in a suitable manner; as, to marshal troops or an army. And marshaling the heroes of his name As, in their order, next to light they came. --Dryden. 2. To direct, guide, or lead. Thou marshalest me the way that I was going. --Shak. 3. (Her.) To dispose in due order, as the different quarterings on an escutcheon, or the different crests when several belong to an achievement.
Marshaling
Marshaling Mar"shal*ing, n. [Written also marshalling.] 1. The act of arranging in due order. 2. (Her.) The arrangement of an escutcheon to exhibit the alliances of the owner. Marshaling of assets (Law), the arranging or ranking of assets in due order of administration.
Marshaling of assets
Marshaling Mar"shal*ing, n. [Written also marshalling.] 1. The act of arranging in due order. 2. (Her.) The arrangement of an escutcheon to exhibit the alliances of the owner. Marshaling of assets (Law), the arranging or ranking of assets in due order of administration.
Marshalled
Marshal Mar"shal, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Marshaledor Marshalled; p. pr. & vb. n. Marshaling or Marshalling.] 1. To dispose in order; to arrange in a suitable manner; as, to marshal troops or an army. And marshaling the heroes of his name As, in their order, next to light they came. --Dryden. 2. To direct, guide, or lead. Thou marshalest me the way that I was going. --Shak. 3. (Her.) To dispose in due order, as the different quarterings on an escutcheon, or the different crests when several belong to an achievement.
Marshalling
Marshal Mar"shal, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Marshaledor Marshalled; p. pr. & vb. n. Marshaling or Marshalling.] 1. To dispose in order; to arrange in a suitable manner; as, to marshal troops or an army. And marshaling the heroes of his name As, in their order, next to light they came. --Dryden. 2. To direct, guide, or lead. Thou marshalest me the way that I was going. --Shak. 3. (Her.) To dispose in due order, as the different quarterings on an escutcheon, or the different crests when several belong to an achievement.
Marshalship
Marshalship Mar"shal*ship, n. The office of a marshal.
Marshbanker
Marshbanker Marsh"bank`er, Marsebanker Marse"bank`er, n. (Zo["o]l.) The menhaden.
Marshiness
Marshiness Marsh"i*ness, n. The state or condition of being marshy.
Marshy
Marshy Marsh"y, a. [E. Marsh.] 1. Resembling a marsh; wet; boggy; fenny. 2. Pertaining to, or produced in, marshes; as, a marshy weed. --Dryden.
Submarshal
Submarshal Sub*mar"shal, n. An under or deputy marshal.

Meaning of Marsh from wikipedia

- A marsh is a wetland that is dominated by herbaceous rather than woody plant species. Marshes can often be found at the edges of lakes and streams, where...
- A salt marsh or saltmarsh, also known as a coastal salt marsh or a tidal marsh, is a coastal ecosystem in the upper coastal intertidal zone between land...
- Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. is a global professional services firm, headquartered in New York City with businesses in insurance brokerage, risk management...
- Shaun Edward Marsh (born 9 July 1983) is an Australian cricketer who plays for the Western Warriors in Australian domestic cricket and represents Australia...
- Geoffrey Robert Marsh (born 31 December 1958) is a former Australian cricketer, coach and selector. He pla**** 50 Test matches and 117 One Day Internationals...
- Marsh has represented Australia in all three forms of cricket, making his debut during the 2011–12 season. Marsh is the second son of Geoff Marsh and...
- also translated as Outlaws of the Marsh, Tale of the Marshes, All Men Are Brothers, Men of the Marshes or The Marshes of Mount Liang, is a Chinese novel...
- Kimberley Gail "Kym" Marsh (formerly Ryder and Lomas; born 13 June 1976) is an English actress and former singer-songwriter, who rose to fame in 2001...
- The western marsh harrier (Circus aeruginosus) is a large harrier, a bird of prey from temperate and subtropical western Eurasia and adjacent Africa....
- Jodie Louise Marsh (born 23 December 1978) is an English media personality, bodybuilder, columnist and model. She has appeared in many TV shows, such...
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