Definition of Maculatus. Meaning of Maculatus. Synonyms of Maculatus

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Definition of Maculatus

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C maculatus
Wrymouth Wry"mouth`, n. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of large, elongated, marine fishes of the genus Cryptacanthodes, especially C. maculatus of the American coast. A whitish variety is called ghostfish.
Galeocerdo maculatus or tigrinus
Tiger Ti"ger, n. [OE. tigre, F. tigre, L. tigris, Gr. ti`gris; probably of Persian origin; cf. Zend tighra pointed, tighri an arrow, Per. t[=i]r; perhaps akin to E. stick, v.t.; -- probably so named from its quickness.] 1. A very large and powerful carnivore (Felis tigris) native of Southern Asia and the East Indies. Its back and sides are tawny or rufous yellow, transversely striped with black, the tail is ringed with black, the throat and belly are nearly white. When full grown, it equals or exceeds the lion in size and strength. Called also royal tiger, and Bengal tiger. 2. Fig.: A ferocious, bloodthirsty person. As for heinous tiger, Tamora. --Shak. 3. A servant in livery, who rides with his master or mistress. --Dickens. 4. A kind of growl or screech, after cheering; as, three cheers and a tiger. [Colloq. U. S.] 5. A pneumatic box or pan used in refining sugar. American tiger. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The puma. (b) The jaguar. Clouded tiger (Zo["o]l.), a handsome striped and spotted carnivore (Felis macrocelis or F. marmorata) native of the East Indies and Southern Asia. Its body is about three and a half feet long, and its tail about three feet long. Its ground color is brownish gray, and the dark markings are irregular stripes, spots, and rings, but there are always two dark bands on the face, one extending back from the eye, and one from the angle of the mouth. Called also tortoise-shell tiger. Mexican tiger (Zo["o]l.), the jaguar. Tiger beetle (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of active carnivorous beetles of the family Cicindelid[ae]. They usually inhabit dry or sandy places, and fly rapidly. Tiger bittern. (Zo["o]l.) See Sun bittern, under Sun. Tiger cat (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of wild cats of moderate size with dark transverse bars or stripes somewhat resembling those of the tiger. Tiger flower (Bot.), an iridaceous plant of the genus Tigridia (as T. conchiflora, T. grandiflora, etc.) having showy flowers, spotted or streaked somewhat like the skin of a tiger. Tiger grass (Bot.), a low East Indian fan palm (Cham[ae]rops Ritchieana). It is used in many ways by the natives. --J. Smith (Dict. Econ. Plants). Tiger lily. (Bot.) See under Lily. Tiger moth (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of moths of the family Arctiad[ae] which are striped or barred with black and white or with other conspicuous colors. The larv[ae] are called woolly bears. Tiger shark (Zo["o]l.), a voracious shark (Galeocerdo maculatus or tigrinus) more or less barred or spotted with yellow. It is found in both the Atlantic and Indian Ocean. Called also zebra shark. Tiger shell (Zo["o]l.), a large and conspicuously spotted cowrie (Cypr[ae]a tigris); -- so called from its fancied resemblance to a tiger in color and markings. Called also tiger cowrie. Tiger wolf (Zo["o]l.), the spotted hyena (Hy[ae]na crocuta). Tiger wood, the variegated heartwood of a tree (Mach[ae]rium Schomburgkii) found in Guiana.
Heptranchias maculatus
Shovelnose Shov"el*nose`, n. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The common sand shark. See under Snad. (b) A small California shark (Heptranchias maculatus), which is taken for its oil. (c) A Pacific Ocean shark (Hexanchus corinus). (d) A ganoid fish of the Sturgeon family (Scaphirhynchus platyrhynchus) of the Mississippi and Ohio rivers; -- called also white sturgeon.
Hippotragus or Oryx nasomaculatus
Addax Ad"dax, n. [Native name.] (Zo["o]l.) One of the largest African antelopes (Hippotragus, or Oryx, nasomaculatus). Note: It is now believed to be the Strepsiceros (twisted horn) of the ancients. By some it is thought to be the pygarg of the Bible.
Labrus maculatus
Wrasse Wrasse, n. [W. gwrachen.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous edible, marine, spiny-finned fishes of the genus Labrus, of which several species are found in the Mediterranean and on the Atlantic coast of Europe. Many of the species are bright-colored. Note: Among the European species are the ballan wrasse (Labrus maculatus), the streaked wrasse (L. lineatus), the red wrasse (L. mixtus), the comber wrasse (L. comber), the blue-striped, or cook, wrasse (see Peacock fish, under Peacock), the rainbow wrasse (L. vulgaris), and the seawife.
Larinus maculatus
Trehala Tre*ha"la, n. (Chem.) An amorphous variety of manna obtained from the nests and cocoons of a Syrian coleopterous insect (Larinus maculatus, L. nidificans, etc.) which feeds on the foliage of a variety of thistle. It is used as an article of food, and is called also nest sugar.
Pleuronectes maculatus
Water flounder Wa"ter floun"der (Zo["o]l.) The windowpane (Pleuronectes maculatus). [Local, U. S.]
Pleuronectes maculatus
Windowpane Win"dow*pane`, n. 1. (Arch.) See Pane, n., (3) b . [In this sense, written also window pane.] 2. (Zo["o]l.) A thin, spotted American turbot (Pleuronectes maculatus) remarkable for its translucency. It is not valued as a food fish. Called also spotted turbot, daylight, spotted sand flounder, and water flounder.
Scomberomorus maculatus
Spanish Span"ish, a. Of or pertaining to Spain or the Spaniards. Spanish bayonet (Bot.), a liliaceous plant (Yucca alorifolia) with rigid spine-tipped leaves. The name is also applied to other similar plants of the Southwestern United States and mexico. Called also Spanish daggers. Spanish bean (Bot.) See the Note under Bean. Spanish black, a black pigment obtained by charring cork. --Ure. Spanish broom (Bot.), a leguminous shrub (Spartium junceum) having many green flexible rushlike twigs. Spanish brown, a species of earth used in painting, having a dark reddish brown color, due to the presence of sesquioxide of iron. Spanish buckeye (Bot.), a small tree (Ungnadia speciosa) of Texas, New Mexico, etc., related to the buckeye, but having pinnate leaves and a three-seeded fruit. Spanish burton (Naut.), a purchase composed of two single blocks. A double Spanish burton has one double and two single blocks. --Luce (Textbook of Seamanship). Spanish chalk (Min.), a kind of steatite; -- so called because obtained from Aragon in Spain. Spanish cress (Bot.), a cruciferous plant (lepidium Cadamines), a species of peppergrass. Spanish curiew (Zo["o]l.), the long-billed curlew. [U.S.] Spanish daggers (Bot.) See Spanish bayonet. Spanish elm (Bot.), a large West Indian tree (Cordia Gerascanthus) furnishing hard and useful timber. Spanish feretto, a rich reddish brown pigment obtained by calcining copper and sulphur together in closed crucibles. Spanish flag (Zo["o]l.), the California rockfish (Sebastichthys rubrivinctus). It is conspicuously colored with bands of red and white. Spanish fly (Zo["o]l.), a brilliant green beetle, common in the south of Europe, used for raising blisters. See Blister beetle under Blister, and Cantharis. Spanish fox (Naut.), a yarn twisted against its lay. Spanish grass. (Bot.) See Esparto. Spanish juice (Bot.), licorice. Spanish leather. See Cordwain. Spanish mackerel. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A species of mackerel (Scomber colias) found both in Europe and America. In America called chub mackerel, big-eyed mackerel, and bull mackerel. (b) In the United States, a handsome mackerel having bright yellow round spots (Scomberomorus maculatus), highly esteemed as a food fish. The name is sometimes erroneously applied to other species. See Illust. under Mackerel. Spanish main, the name formerly given to the southern portion of the Caribbean Sea, together with the contiguous coast, embracing the route traversed by Spanish treasure ships from the New to the Old World. Spanish moss. (Bot.) See Tillandsia. Spanish needles (Bot.), a composite weed (Bidens bipinnata) having achenia armed with needlelike awns. Spanish nut (Bot.), a bulbous plant (Iris Sisyrinchium) of the south of Europe. Spanish potato (Bot.), the sweet potato. See under Potato. Spanish red, an ocherous red pigment resembling Venetian red, but slightly yellower and warmer. --Fairholt. Spanish reef (Naut.), a knot tied in the head of a jib-headed sail. Spanish sheep (Zo["o]l.), a merino. Spanish white, an impalpable powder prepared from chalk by pulverizing and repeated washings, -- used as a white pigment. Spanish windlass (Naut.), a wooden roller, with a rope wound about it, into which a marline spike is thrust to serve as a lever.

Meaning of Maculatus from wikipedia

- entry on "maculatus" instead. You can also search for Maculatus in Wikipedia to check for alternative titles or spellings. Start the Maculatus article,...
- The spotted towhee (Pipilo maculatus) is a large New World sparrow. The taxonomy of the towhees has been debated in recent decades, and until 1995 this...
- Callosobruchus maculatus is a species of beetles known commonly as the cowpea weevil or cowpea seed beetle. It is a member of the leaf beetle family,...
- 2016. "Isometrus maculatus (lesser brown scorpion)". Invasive Species Database. CAB International. Media related to Isometrus maculatus at Wikimedia Commons...
- Media related to Dermestes maculatus at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Dermestes maculatus at Wikispecies Dermestes maculatus at Fauna Europaea "Hide...
- maculatus". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 18 April 2006. Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2006). "Scomberomorus maculatus"...
- American opossum. The species name, maculatus, indicates this species is spotted. Two subspecies are recognised: D. m. maculatus, found from southern Queensland...
- The marozi or "spotted lion" is variously claimed by zoologists to be a distinct race of the lion adapted for a montane rather than savanna-dwelling existence...
- sold in pet shops is not a pure strain of X. maculatus, but is a hybrid between X. ****erii and X. maculatus. In general, if the male has a sword-shaped...
- "Adromischus maculatus". World Checklist of Selected Plant Families (WCSP). Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew – via The Plant List. "Adromischus maculatus". PlantZAfrica...
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