Definition of Machi. Meaning of Machi. Synonyms of Machi

Definition of Machi. Meaning of Machi. Synonyms of Machi

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Machi. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Machi and, of course, Machi synonyms and on the right images related to the word Machi.

Definition of Machi

No result for Machi. Showing similar results...

Bathing machine
Bathing Bath"ing, n. Act of taking a bath or baths. Bathing machine, a small room on wheels, to be driven into the water, for the convenience of bathers, who undress and dress therein.
batting machine
Scutch Scutch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scutched; p. pr. & vb. n. Scutching.] [See Scotch to cut slightly.] 1. To beat or whip; to drub. [Old or Prov. Eng. & Scot.] 2. To separate the woody fiber from (flax, hemp, etc.) by beating; to swingle. 3. To loosen and dress the fiber of (cotton or silk) by beating; to free (fibrous substances) from dust by beating and blowing. Scutching machine, a machine used to scutch cotton, silk, or flax; -- called also batting machine.
Burnishing machine
Burnish Bur"nish, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Burnished; p. pr. & vb. n. Burnishing.] [OE. burnischen, burnissen, burnen, OF. burnir, brunir, to make brown, polish, F. brunir, fr. F. brun brown, fr. OHG. br?n; cf. MHG. briunen to make brown, polish. See Brown, a.] To cause to shine; to make smooth and bright; to polish; specifically, to polish by rubbing with something hard and smooth; as, to burnish brass or paper. The frame of burnished steel, that east a glare From far, and seemed to thaw the freezing air. --Dryden. Now the village windows blaze, Burnished by the setting sun. --Cunningham. Burnishing machine, a machine for smoothing and polishing by compression, as in making paper collars.
Burring machine
Burring machine Burr"ing ma*chine" A machine for cleansing wool of burs, seeds, and other substances.
Calculating machine
Calculating Cal"cu*la`ting, a. 1. Of or pertaining to mathematical calculations; performing or able to perform mathematical calculations. 2. Given to contrivance or forethought; forecasting; scheming; as, a cool calculating disposition. Calculating machine, a machine for the mechanical performance of mathematical operations, for the most part invented by Charles Babbage and G. and E. Scheutz. It computes logarithmic and other mathematical tables of a high degree of intricacy, imprinting the results on a leaden plate, from which a stereotype plate is then directly made.
Carding machine
Carding Card"ing, a. 1. The act or process of preparing staple for spinning, etc., by carding it. See the Note under Card, v. t. 2. A roll of wool or other fiber as it comes from the carding machine. Carding engine, Carding machine, a machine for carding cotton, wool, or other fiber, by subjecting it to the action of cylinders, or drum covered with wire-toothed cards, revoling nearly in contact with each other, at different rates of speed, or in opposite directions. The staple issues in soft sheets, or in slender rolls called sivers.
Centrifugal machine
Centrifugal Cen*trif"u*gal, a. [L. centrum center + fugere to flee.] 1. Tending, or causing, to recede from the center. 2. (Bot.) (a) Expanding first at the summit, and later at the base, as a flower cluster. (b) Having the radicle turned toward the sides of the fruit, as some embryos. Centrifugal force (Mech.), a force whose direction is from a center. Note: When a body moves in a circle with uniform velocity, a force must act on the body to keep it in the circle without change of velocity. The direction of this force is towards the center of the circle. If this force is applied by means of a string to the body, the string will be in a state of tension. To a person holding the other end of the string, this tension will appear to be directed toward the body as if the body had a tendency to move away from the center of the circle which it is describing. Hence this latter force is often called centrifugal force. The force which really acts on the body being directed towards the center of the circle is called centripetal force, and in some popular treatises the centripetal and centrifugal forces are described as opposing and balancing each other. But they are merely the different aspects of the same stress. --Clerk Maxwell. Centrifugal impression (Physiol.), an impression (motor) sent from a nerve center outwards to a muscle or muscles by which motion is produced. Centrifugal machine, A machine for expelling water or other fluids from moist substances, or for separating liquids of different densities by centrifugal action; a whirling table. Centrifugal pump, a machine in which water or other fluid is lifted and discharged through a pipe by the energy imparted by a wheel or blades revolving in a fixed case. Some of the largest and most powerful pumps are of this kind.
Disengaging machinery
Disengaging Dis`en*ga"ging, a. Loosing; setting free; detaching. Disengaging machinery. See under Engaging.
Dredging machine
Dredge Dredge, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Dredged; p. pr. & vb. n. Dredging.] To catch or gather with a dredge; to deepen with a dredging machine. --R. Carew. Dredging machine, a machine (commonly on a boat) used to scoop up mud, gravel, or obstructions from the bottom of rivers, docks, etc., so as to deepen them.
Edging machine
Edging Edg"ing, n. 1. That which forms an edge or border, as the fringe, trimming, etc., of a garment, or a border in a garden. --Dryden. 2. The operation of shaping or dressing the edge of anything, as of a piece of metal. Edging machine, a machine tool with a revolving cutter, for dressing edges, as of boards, or metal plates, to a pattern or templet.
Elementary machine
Machine Ma*chine", n. [F., fr. L. machina machine, engine, device, trick, Gr. ?, from ? means, expedient. Cf. Mechanic.] 1. In general, any combination of bodies so connected that their relative motions are constrained, and by means of which force and motion may be transmitted and modified, as a screw and its nut, or a lever arranged to turn about a fulcrum or a pulley about its pivot, etc.; especially, a construction, more or less complex, consisting of a combination of moving parts, or simple mechanical elements, as wheels, levers, cams, etc., with their supports and connecting framework, calculated to constitute a prime mover, or to receive force and motion from a prime mover or from another machine, and transmit, modify, and apply them to the production of some desired mechanical effect or work, as weaving by a loom, or the excitation of electricity by an electrical machine. Note: The term machine is most commonly applied to such pieces of mechanism as are used in the industrial arts, for mechanically shaping, dressing, and combining materials for various purposes, as in the manufacture of cloth, etc. Where the effect is chemical, or other than mechanical, the contrivance is usually denominated an apparatus, not a machine; as, a bleaching apparatus. Many large, powerful, or specially important pieces of mechanism are called engines; as, a steam engine, fire engine, graduating engine, etc. Although there is no well-settled distinction between the terms engine and machine among practical men, there is a tendency to restrict the application of the former to contrivances in which the operating part is not distinct from the motor. 2. Any mechanical contrivance, as the wooden horse with which the Greeks entered Troy; a coach; a bicycle. --Dryden. --Southey. --Thackeray. 3. A person who acts mechanically or at will of another. 4. A combination of persons acting together for a common purpose, with the agencies which they use; as, the social machine. The whole machine of government ought not to bear upon the people with a weight so heavy and oppressive. --Landor. 5. A political organization arranged and controlled by one or more leaders for selfish, private or partisan ends. [Political Cant] 6. Supernatural agency in a poem, or a superhuman being introduced to perform some exploit. --Addison. Elementary machine, a name sometimes given to one of the simple mechanical powers. See under Mechanical. Infernal machine. See under Infernal. Machine gun.See under Gun. Machine screw, a screw or bolt adapted for screwing into metal, in distinction from one which is designed especially to be screwed into wood. Machine shop, a workshop where machines are made, or where metal is shaped by cutting, filing, turning, etc. Machine tool, a machine for cutting or shaping wood, metal, etc., by means of a tool; especially, a machine, as a lathe, planer, drilling machine, etc., designed for a more or less general use in a machine shop, in distinction from a machine for producing a special article as in manufacturing. Machine twist, silken thread especially adapted for use in a sewing machine. Machine work, work done by a machine, in contradistinction to that done by hand labor.
Epimachinae
Bird of paradise Bird" of par"a*dise (Zo["o]l.) The name of several very beautiful birds of the genus Paradisea and allied genera, inhabiting New Guinea and the adjacent islands. The males have brilliant colors, elegant plumes, and often remarkable tail feathers. Note: The Great emerald (Paradisea apoda) and the Lesser emerald (P. minor) furnish many of the plumes used as ornaments by ladies; the Red is P. rubra or sanguinea; the Golden is Parotia aurea or sexsetacea; the King is Cincinnurus regius. The name is also applied to the longer-billed birds of another related group (Epimachin[ae]) from the same region. The Twelve-wired (Seleucides alba) is one of these. See Paradise bird, and Note under Apod.
Fanning machine
Fan Fan, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Fanned; p. pr. & vb. n. Fanning.] [Cf. OF. vanner, L. vannere. See Fan, n., Van a winnowing machine.] 1. To move as with a fan. The air . . . fanned with unnumbered plumes. --Milton. 2. To cool and refresh, by moving the air with a fan; to blow the air on the face of with a fan. 3. To ventilate; to blow on; to affect by air put in motion. Calm as the breath which fans our eastern groves. --Dryden. 4. To winnow; to separate chaff from, and drive it away by a current of air; as, to fan wheat. --Jer. li. 2. 5. To excite or stir up to activity, as a fan axcites a flame; to stimulate; as, this conduct fanned the excitement of the populace. Fanning machine, or Fanning mill, a machine for separating seed from chaff, etc., by a blast of air; a fanner.
Forcing machine
Forcing For"cing, n. 1. The accomplishing of any purpose violently, precipitately, prematurely, or with unusual expedition. 2. (Gardening) The art of raising plants, flowers, and fruits at an earlier season than the natural one, as in a hitbed or by the use of artificial heat. Forcing bed or pit, a plant bed having an under layer of fermenting manure, the fermentation yielding bottom heat for forcing plants; a hotbed. Forcing engine, a fire engine. Forcing fit (Mech.), a tight fit, as of one part into a hole in another part, which makes it necessary to use considerable force in putting the two parts together. Forcing house, a greenhouse for the forcing of plants, fruit trees, etc. Forcing machine, a powerful press for putting together or separating two parts that are fitted tightly one into another, as for forcing a crank on a shaft, or for drawing off a car wheel from the axle. Forcing pump. See Force pump (b) .
Freezing machine
Freezing Freez"ing, a. Tending to freeze; for freezing; hence, cold or distant in manner. -- Frrez"ing*ly, adv. Freezing machine. See Ice machine, under Ice. Freezing mixture, a mixture (of salt and snow or of chemical salts) for producing intense cold. Freezing point, that degree of a thermometer at which a fluid begins to freeze; -- applied particularly to water, whose freezing point is at 32[deg] Fahr., and at 0[deg] Centigrade.
Friction machine
Ftiction Ftic"tion, n. [L. frictio, fr. fricare, frictum,to rub: cf. F. friction. See Fray to rub, arid cf. Dentifrice.] 1. The act of rubbing the surface of one body against that of another; attrition; in hygiene, the act of rubbing the body with the hand, with flannel, or with a brush etc., to excite the skin to healthy action. 2. (Mech.) The resistance which a body meets with from the surface on which it moves. It may be resistance to sliding motion, or to rolling motion. 3. A clashing between two persons or parties in opinions or work; a disagreement tending to prevent or retard progress. Angle of friction (Mech.), the angle which a plane onwhich a body is lying makes with a horizontal plane,when the hody is just ready to slide dewn the plane. Note: This angle varies for different bodies, and for planes of different materials. Anti-friction wheels (Mach.), wheels turning freely on small pivots, and sustaining, at the angle formed by their circumferences, the pivot or journal of a revolving shaft, to relieve it of friction; -- called also friction wheels. Friction balls, or Friction rollers, balls or rollers placed so as to receive the pressure or weight of bodies in motion, and relieve friction, as in the hub of a bicycle wheel. Friction brake (Mach.), a form of dynamometer for measuring the power a motor exerts. A clamp around the revolving shaft or fly wheel of the motor resists the motion by its friction, the work thus absorbed being ascertained by observing the force required to keep the clamp from revolving with the shaft; a Prony brake. Friction chocks, brakes attached to the common standing garrison carriages of guns, so as to raise the trucks or wheels off the platform when the gun begins to recoil, and prevent its running back. --Earrow. Friction clutch, Friction coupling, an engaging and disengaging gear for revolving shafts, pulleys, etc., acting by friction; esp.: (a) A device in which a piece on one shaft or pulley is so forcibly pressed against a piece on another shaft that the two will revolve together; as, in the illustration, the cone a on one shaft, when thrust forcibly into the corresponding hollow cone b on the other shaft, compels the shafts to rotate together, by the hold the friction of the conical surfaces gives. (b) A toothed clutch, one member of which, instead of being made fast on its shaft, is held by friction and can turn, by slipping, under excessive strain or in starting. Friction drop hammer, one in which the hammer is raised for striking by the friction of revolving rollers which nip the hammer rod. Friction gear. See Frictional gearing, under Frictional. Friction machine, an electrical machine, generating electricity by friction. Friction meter, an instrument for measuring friction, as in testing lubricants. Friction powder, Friction composition, a composition of chlorate of potassium, antimony, sulphide, etc, which readily ignites by friction. Friction primer, Friction tube, a tube used for firing cannon by means of the friction of a roughened wire in the friction powder or composition with which the tube is filled. Friction wheel (Mach.), one of the wheels in frictional gearing. See under Frictional.
Friezing machine
Frieze Frieze, v. t. To make a nap on (cloth); to friz. See Friz, v. t., 2. Friezing machine, a machine for friezing cloth; a friezing machine.
Frizzing machine
Friz Friz, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Frizzed; p. pr. & vb. n. Frizzing.] [Cf. F. friser to curl, crisp, frizzle, to raise the nap (on certain stuffs); prob.akin to OFries. frisle hair of the head. Cf. Frieze kind of cloth.] [Written also frizz.] 1. To curl or form into small curls, as hair, with a crisping pin; to crisp. With her hair frizzed short up to her ears. --Pepys. 2. To form into little burs, prominences, knobs, or tufts, as the nap of cloth. 3. (Leather Manufacture) To soften and make of even thickness by rubbing, as with pumice stone or a blunt instrument. Frizzing machine. (a) (Fabrics) A machine for frizzing the surface of cloth. (b) (Wood Working) A bench with a revolving cutter head slightly protruding above its surface, for dressing boards.
Gas machine
Gas fitter, one who lays pipes and puts up fixtures for gas. Gas fitting. (a) The occupation of a gas fitter. (b) pl. The appliances needed for the introduction of gas into a building, as meters, pipes, burners, etc. Gas fixture, a device for conveying illuminating or combustible gas from the pipe to the gas-burner, consisting of an appendage of cast, wrought, or drawn metal, with tubes upon which the burners, keys, etc., are adjusted. Gas generator, an apparatus in which gas is evolved; as: (a) a retort in which volatile hydrocarbons are evolved by heat; (b) a machine in which air is saturated with the vapor of liquid hydrocarbon; a carburetor; (c) a machine for the production of carbonic acid gas, for a["e]rating water, bread, etc. --Knight. Gas jet, a flame of illuminating gas. Gas machine, an apparatus for carbureting air for use as illuminating gas. Gas meter, an instrument for recording the quantity of gas consumed in a given time, at a particular place. Gas retort, a retort which contains the coal and other materials, and in which the gas is generated, in the manufacture of gas. Gas stove, a stove for cooking or other purposes, heated by gas. Gas tar, coal tar. Gas trap, a drain trap; a sewer trap. See 4th Trap, 5. Gas washer (Gas Works), an apparatus within which gas from the condenser is brought in contact with a falling stream of water, to precipitate the tar remaining in it. --Knight. Gas water, water through which gas has been passed for purification; -- called also gas liquor and ammoniacal water, and used for the manufacture of sal ammoniac, carbonate of ammonia, and Prussian blue. --Tomlinson. Gas well, a deep boring, from which natural gas is discharged. --Raymond. Gas works, a manufactory of gas, with all the machinery and appurtenances; a place where gas is generated for lighting cities. Laughing gas. See under Laughing. Marsh gas (Chem.), a light, combustible, gaseous hydrocarbon, CH4, produced artificially by the dry distillation of many organic substances, and occurring as a natural product of decomposition in stagnant pools, whence its name. It is an abundant ingredient of ordinary illuminating gas, and is the first member of the paraffin series. Called also methane, and in coal mines, fire damp. Natural gas, gas obtained from wells, etc., in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and elsewhere, and largely used for fuel and illuminating purposes. It is chiefly derived from the Coal Measures. Olefiant gas (Chem.). See Ethylene. Water gas (Chem.), a kind of gas made by forcing steam over glowing coals, whereby there results a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This gives a gas of intense heating power, but destitute of light-giving properties, and which is charged by passing through some volatile hydrocarbon, as gasoline.
gear or machinery
Engaging En*ga"ging, a. Tending to draw the attention or affections; attractive; as, engaging manners or address. -- En*ga"ging*ly, adv. -- En*ga"ging*ness, n. Engaging and disengaging gear or machinery, that in which, or by means of which, one part is alternately brought into gear or out of gear with another part, as occasion may require.
Gliding machine
Gliding machine Gliding machine (A["e]ronautics) A construction consisting essentially of one or more a["e]roplanes for gliding in an inclined path from a height to the ground.
Gramme machine
Gramme machine Gramme" ma*chine" (Elec.) A kind of dynamo-electric machine; -- so named from its French inventor, M. Gramme. --Knight.
Hydro-electric machine
Hydro-electric Hy`dro-e*lec"tric, a. [Hydro-, 1 + electric.] Pertaining to, employed in, or produced by, the evolution of electricity by means of a battery in which water or steam is used. Hydro-electric machine (Physics), an apparatus invented by Sir William Armstrong of England for generating electricity by the escape of high-pressure steam from a series of jets connected with a strong boiler, in which the steam is produced.
Infernal machine
Machine Ma*chine", n. [F., fr. L. machina machine, engine, device, trick, Gr. ?, from ? means, expedient. Cf. Mechanic.] 1. In general, any combination of bodies so connected that their relative motions are constrained, and by means of which force and motion may be transmitted and modified, as a screw and its nut, or a lever arranged to turn about a fulcrum or a pulley about its pivot, etc.; especially, a construction, more or less complex, consisting of a combination of moving parts, or simple mechanical elements, as wheels, levers, cams, etc., with their supports and connecting framework, calculated to constitute a prime mover, or to receive force and motion from a prime mover or from another machine, and transmit, modify, and apply them to the production of some desired mechanical effect or work, as weaving by a loom, or the excitation of electricity by an electrical machine. Note: The term machine is most commonly applied to such pieces of mechanism as are used in the industrial arts, for mechanically shaping, dressing, and combining materials for various purposes, as in the manufacture of cloth, etc. Where the effect is chemical, or other than mechanical, the contrivance is usually denominated an apparatus, not a machine; as, a bleaching apparatus. Many large, powerful, or specially important pieces of mechanism are called engines; as, a steam engine, fire engine, graduating engine, etc. Although there is no well-settled distinction between the terms engine and machine among practical men, there is a tendency to restrict the application of the former to contrivances in which the operating part is not distinct from the motor. 2. Any mechanical contrivance, as the wooden horse with which the Greeks entered Troy; a coach; a bicycle. --Dryden. --Southey. --Thackeray. 3. A person who acts mechanically or at will of another. 4. A combination of persons acting together for a common purpose, with the agencies which they use; as, the social machine. The whole machine of government ought not to bear upon the people with a weight so heavy and oppressive. --Landor. 5. A political organization arranged and controlled by one or more leaders for selfish, private or partisan ends. [Political Cant] 6. Supernatural agency in a poem, or a superhuman being introduced to perform some exploit. --Addison. Elementary machine, a name sometimes given to one of the simple mechanical powers. See under Mechanical. Infernal machine. See under Infernal. Machine gun.See under Gun. Machine screw, a screw or bolt adapted for screwing into metal, in distinction from one which is designed especially to be screwed into wood. Machine shop, a workshop where machines are made, or where metal is shaped by cutting, filing, turning, etc. Machine tool, a machine for cutting or shaping wood, metal, etc., by means of a tool; especially, a machine, as a lathe, planer, drilling machine, etc., designed for a more or less general use in a machine shop, in distinction from a machine for producing a special article as in manufacturing. Machine twist, silken thread especially adapted for use in a sewing machine. Machine work, work done by a machine, in contradistinction to that done by hand labor.
Jigging machine
Jigging Jig"ging, n. (Mining) The act or using a jig; the act of separating ore with a jigger, or wire-bottomed sieve, which is moved up and down in water. Jigging machine. (a) (Mining) A machine for separating ore by the process of jigging. (b) (Metal Working) A machine with a rotary milling cutter and a templet by which the action of the cutter is guided or limited; -- used for forming the profile of an irregularly shaped piece; a profiling machine.
Jointing machine
Jointing Joint"ing, n. The act or process of making a joint; also, the joints thus produced. Jointing machine, a planing machine for wood used in furniture and piano factories, etc. Jointing plane. See Jointer, 2. Jointing rule (Masonry), a long straight rule, used by bricklayers for securing straight joints and faces.
Knitting machine
Knitting Knit"ting, n. 1. The work of a knitter; the network formed by knitting. 2. Union formed by knitting, as of bones. Knitting machine, one of a number of contrivances for mechanically knitting stockings, jerseys, and the like. Knitting ?eedle, a stiff rod, as of steel wire, with rounded ends for knitting yarn or threads into a fabric, as in stockings. Knitting sheath, a sheath to receive the end of a needle in knitting.
Lapping machine
Lapping Lap"ping, n. A kind of machine blanket or wrapping material used by calico printers. --Ure. Lapping engine, Lapping machine (Textile Manuf.), A machine for forming fiber info a lap. See its Lap, 9.
lifting machine
Health Health, n. [OE. helthe, AS. h?lp, fr. h[=a]l hale, sound, whole. See Whole.] 1. The state of being hale, sound, or whole, in body, mind, or soul; especially, the state of being free from physical disease or pain. There is no health in us. --Book of Common Prayer. Though health may be enjoyed without gratitude, it can not be sported with without loss, or regained by courage. --Buckminster. 2. A wish of health and happiness, as in pledging a person in a toast. ``Come, love and health to all.' --Shak. Bill of health. See under Bill. Health lift, a machine for exercise, so arranged that a person lifts an increasing weight, or moves a spring of increasing tension, in such a manner that most of the muscles of the body are brought into gradual action; -- also called lifting machine. Health officer, one charged with the enforcement of the sanitary laws of a port or other place. To drink a health. See under Drink.
Logomachist
Logomachist Lo*gom"a*chist, n. [See Logomachy.] One who contends about words.

Meaning of Machi from wikipedia

- Machi may refer to: Machi, Iran, a village in Hormozgan Province, Iran Maji, Ethiopia, a city in southwestern Ethiopia Machi, Manipur, India Machi...
- ERASED, known in ****an as Boku dake ga Inai Machi (僕だけがいない街, lit. The Town Without Me), is a ****anese manga series written and illustrated by Kei Sanbe...
- Machi Koro (****anese: 街コロ "Dice Town") is a tabletop city-building game designed by Masao Suganuma, illustrated by Noboru Hotta, and published in 2012...
- A machi is a traditional healer and religious leader in the Mapuche culture of Chile and Argentina. Machis play significant roles in Mapuche religion....
- Darwin Daniel Machís Marcano (born 7 February 1993) is a Venezuelan footballer who plays for Italian club Udinese as a striker. Machís started his career...
- Machi is both a surname and a feminine ****anese given name. Notable people with the name include: Surname: Carmen Machi (born 1963), Spanish actor Jean...
- these processions is usually organised at the level of neighborhoods, or machi (町). Prior to these, the local kami may be ritually installed in mikoshi...
- Machi Goth is a village in Sindh, ****stan....
- María del Carmen Machi Arroyo, professionally known as Carmen Machi (born 7 January 1963) is a Spanish actress. She's mostly known for her role as Aída...
- Boku Dake ga Inai Machi (僕だけがいない街, lit. "The Town Where Only I Am Missing"), localized as Erased, is a 2016 ****anese thriller fantasy mystery film adaptation...
Loading...