Definition of Mechanic. Meaning of Mechanic. Synonyms of Mechanic

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Definition of Mechanic

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Aeromechanic
Aeromechanic A`["e]r*o*me*chan"ic, n. A mechanic or mechanician expert in the art and practice of a["e]ronautics.
Aeromechanic
Aeromechanic A`["e]r*o*me*chan"ic, Aeromechanical A`["e]r*o*me*chan"ical, a. Of or pert. to a["e]romechanics.
Aeromechanical
Aeromechanic A`["e]r*o*me*chan"ic, Aeromechanical A`["e]r*o*me*chan"ical, a. Of or pert. to a["e]romechanics.
Aeromechanics
Aeromechanics A`["e]r*o*me*chan"ics, n. The science of equilibrium and motion of air or an a["e]riform fluid, including a["e]rodynamics and a["e]rostatics.
Hydromechanics
Hydromechanics Hy`dro*me*chan"ics, n. [Hydro-, 1 + mechanics.] That branch of physics which treats of the mechanics of liquids, or of their laws of equilibrium and of motion.
Immechanical
Immechanical Im`me*chan"ic*al, a. Not mechanical. [Obs.] --Cheyne. -- Im"me*chan"ic*al*ly, adv. [Obs.]
Immechanically
Immechanical Im`me*chan"ic*al, a. Not mechanical. [Obs.] --Cheyne. -- Im"me*chan"ic*al*ly, adv. [Obs.]
Mechanical
Mechanical Me*chan"ic*al, a. [From Mechanic, a.] 1. Pertaining to, governed by, or in accordance with, mechanics, or the laws of motion; pertaining to the quantitative relations of force and matter, as distinguished from mental, vital, chemical, etc.; as, mechanical principles; a mechanical theory; mechanical deposits. 2. Of or pertaining to a machine or to machinery or tools; made or formed by a machine or with tools; as, mechanical precision; mechanical products. We have also divers mechanical arts. --Bacon. 3. Done as if by a machine; uninfluenced by will or emotion; proceeding automatically, or by habit, without special intention or reflection; as, mechanical singing; mechanical verses; mechanical service. 4. Made and operated by interaction of forces without a directing intelligence; as, a mechanical universe. 5. Obtained by trial, by measurements, etc.; approximate; empirical. See the 2d Note under Geometric. Mechanical effect, effective power; useful work exerted, as by a machine, in a definite time. Mechanical engineering. See the Note under Engineering. Mechanical maneuvers (Mil.), the application of mechanical appliances to the mounting, dismounting, and moving of artillery. --Farrow. Mechanical philosophy, the principles of mechanics applied to the inverstigation of physical phenomena. Mechanical powers, certain simple instruments, such as the lever and its modifications (the wheel and axle and the pulley), the inclined plane with its modifications (the screw and the wedge), which convert a small force acting through a great space into a great force acting through a small space, or vice versa, and are used separately or in combination. Mechanical solution (Math.), a solution of a problem by any art or contrivance not strictly geometrical, as by means of the ruler and compasses, or other instruments.
Mechanical
Mechanical Me*chan"ic*al, n. A mechanic. [Obs.] --Shak.
Mechanical effect
Mechanical Me*chan"ic*al, a. [From Mechanic, a.] 1. Pertaining to, governed by, or in accordance with, mechanics, or the laws of motion; pertaining to the quantitative relations of force and matter, as distinguished from mental, vital, chemical, etc.; as, mechanical principles; a mechanical theory; mechanical deposits. 2. Of or pertaining to a machine or to machinery or tools; made or formed by a machine or with tools; as, mechanical precision; mechanical products. We have also divers mechanical arts. --Bacon. 3. Done as if by a machine; uninfluenced by will or emotion; proceeding automatically, or by habit, without special intention or reflection; as, mechanical singing; mechanical verses; mechanical service. 4. Made and operated by interaction of forces without a directing intelligence; as, a mechanical universe. 5. Obtained by trial, by measurements, etc.; approximate; empirical. See the 2d Note under Geometric. Mechanical effect, effective power; useful work exerted, as by a machine, in a definite time. Mechanical engineering. See the Note under Engineering. Mechanical maneuvers (Mil.), the application of mechanical appliances to the mounting, dismounting, and moving of artillery. --Farrow. Mechanical philosophy, the principles of mechanics applied to the inverstigation of physical phenomena. Mechanical powers, certain simple instruments, such as the lever and its modifications (the wheel and axle and the pulley), the inclined plane with its modifications (the screw and the wedge), which convert a small force acting through a great space into a great force acting through a small space, or vice versa, and are used separately or in combination. Mechanical solution (Math.), a solution of a problem by any art or contrivance not strictly geometrical, as by means of the ruler and compasses, or other instruments.
Mechanical engineering
Engineering En`gi*neer"ing, n. Originally, the art of managing engines; in its modern and extended sense, the art and science by which the mechanical properties of matter are made useful to man in structures and machines; the occupation and work of an engineer. Note: In a comprehensive sense, engineering includes architecture as a mechanical art, in distinction from architecture as a fine art. It was formerly divided into military engineering, which is the art of designing and constructing offensive and defensive works, and civil engineering, in a broad sense, as relating to other kinds of public works, machinery, etc. Civil engineering, in modern usage, is strictly the art of planning, laying out, and constructing fixed public works, such as railroads, highways, canals, aqueducts, water works, bridges, lighthouses, docks, embankments, breakwaters, dams, tunnels, etc. Mechanical engineering relates to machinery, such as steam engines, machine tools, mill work, etc. Mining engineering deals with the excavation and working of mines, and the extraction of metals from their ores, etc. Engineering is further divided into steam engineering, gas engineering, agricultural engineering, topographical engineering, electrical engineering, etc.
Mechanical engineering
Mechanical Me*chan"ic*al, a. [From Mechanic, a.] 1. Pertaining to, governed by, or in accordance with, mechanics, or the laws of motion; pertaining to the quantitative relations of force and matter, as distinguished from mental, vital, chemical, etc.; as, mechanical principles; a mechanical theory; mechanical deposits. 2. Of or pertaining to a machine or to machinery or tools; made or formed by a machine or with tools; as, mechanical precision; mechanical products. We have also divers mechanical arts. --Bacon. 3. Done as if by a machine; uninfluenced by will or emotion; proceeding automatically, or by habit, without special intention or reflection; as, mechanical singing; mechanical verses; mechanical service. 4. Made and operated by interaction of forces without a directing intelligence; as, a mechanical universe. 5. Obtained by trial, by measurements, etc.; approximate; empirical. See the 2d Note under Geometric. Mechanical effect, effective power; useful work exerted, as by a machine, in a definite time. Mechanical engineering. See the Note under Engineering. Mechanical maneuvers (Mil.), the application of mechanical appliances to the mounting, dismounting, and moving of artillery. --Farrow. Mechanical philosophy, the principles of mechanics applied to the inverstigation of physical phenomena. Mechanical powers, certain simple instruments, such as the lever and its modifications (the wheel and axle and the pulley), the inclined plane with its modifications (the screw and the wedge), which convert a small force acting through a great space into a great force acting through a small space, or vice versa, and are used separately or in combination. Mechanical solution (Math.), a solution of a problem by any art or contrivance not strictly geometrical, as by means of the ruler and compasses, or other instruments.
Mechanical maneuvers
Mechanical Me*chan"ic*al, a. [From Mechanic, a.] 1. Pertaining to, governed by, or in accordance with, mechanics, or the laws of motion; pertaining to the quantitative relations of force and matter, as distinguished from mental, vital, chemical, etc.; as, mechanical principles; a mechanical theory; mechanical deposits. 2. Of or pertaining to a machine or to machinery or tools; made or formed by a machine or with tools; as, mechanical precision; mechanical products. We have also divers mechanical arts. --Bacon. 3. Done as if by a machine; uninfluenced by will or emotion; proceeding automatically, or by habit, without special intention or reflection; as, mechanical singing; mechanical verses; mechanical service. 4. Made and operated by interaction of forces without a directing intelligence; as, a mechanical universe. 5. Obtained by trial, by measurements, etc.; approximate; empirical. See the 2d Note under Geometric. Mechanical effect, effective power; useful work exerted, as by a machine, in a definite time. Mechanical engineering. See the Note under Engineering. Mechanical maneuvers (Mil.), the application of mechanical appliances to the mounting, dismounting, and moving of artillery. --Farrow. Mechanical philosophy, the principles of mechanics applied to the inverstigation of physical phenomena. Mechanical powers, certain simple instruments, such as the lever and its modifications (the wheel and axle and the pulley), the inclined plane with its modifications (the screw and the wedge), which convert a small force acting through a great space into a great force acting through a small space, or vice versa, and are used separately or in combination. Mechanical solution (Math.), a solution of a problem by any art or contrivance not strictly geometrical, as by means of the ruler and compasses, or other instruments.
Mechanical philosophy
Mechanical Me*chan"ic*al, a. [From Mechanic, a.] 1. Pertaining to, governed by, or in accordance with, mechanics, or the laws of motion; pertaining to the quantitative relations of force and matter, as distinguished from mental, vital, chemical, etc.; as, mechanical principles; a mechanical theory; mechanical deposits. 2. Of or pertaining to a machine or to machinery or tools; made or formed by a machine or with tools; as, mechanical precision; mechanical products. We have also divers mechanical arts. --Bacon. 3. Done as if by a machine; uninfluenced by will or emotion; proceeding automatically, or by habit, without special intention or reflection; as, mechanical singing; mechanical verses; mechanical service. 4. Made and operated by interaction of forces without a directing intelligence; as, a mechanical universe. 5. Obtained by trial, by measurements, etc.; approximate; empirical. See the 2d Note under Geometric. Mechanical effect, effective power; useful work exerted, as by a machine, in a definite time. Mechanical engineering. See the Note under Engineering. Mechanical maneuvers (Mil.), the application of mechanical appliances to the mounting, dismounting, and moving of artillery. --Farrow. Mechanical philosophy, the principles of mechanics applied to the inverstigation of physical phenomena. Mechanical powers, certain simple instruments, such as the lever and its modifications (the wheel and axle and the pulley), the inclined plane with its modifications (the screw and the wedge), which convert a small force acting through a great space into a great force acting through a small space, or vice versa, and are used separately or in combination. Mechanical solution (Math.), a solution of a problem by any art or contrivance not strictly geometrical, as by means of the ruler and compasses, or other instruments.
Mechanical powers
7. A large quantity; a great number; as, a power o? good things. [Colloq.] --Richardson. 8. (Mech.) (a) The rate at which mechanical energy is exerted or mechanical work performed, as by an engine or other machine, or an animal, working continuously; as, an engine of twenty horse power. Note: The English unit of power used most commonly is the horse power. See Horse power. (b) A mechanical agent; that from which useful mechanical energy is derived; as, water power; steam power; hand power, etc. (c) Applied force; force producing motion or pressure; as, the power applied at one and of a lever to lift a weight at the other end. Note: This use in mechanics, of power as a synonym for force, is improper and is becoming obsolete. (d) A machine acted upon by an animal, and serving as a motor to drive other machinery; as, a dog power. Note: Power is used adjectively, denoting, driven, or adapted to be driven, by machinery, and not actuated directly by the hand or foot; as, a power lathe; a power loom; a power press. 9. (Math.) The product arising from the multiplication of a number into itself; as, a square is the second power, and a cube is third power, of a number. 10. (Metaph.) Mental or moral ability to act; one of the faculties which are possessed by the mind or soul; as, the power of thinking, reasoning, judging, willing, fearing, hoping, etc. --I. Watts. The guiltiness of my mind, the sudden surprise of my powers, drove the grossness . . . into a received belief. --Shak. 11. (Optics) The degree to which a lens, mirror, or any optical instrument, magnifies; in the telescope, and usually in the microscope, the number of times it multiplies, or augments, the apparent diameter of an object; sometimes, in microscopes, the number of times it multiplies the apparent surface. 12. (Law) An authority enabling a person to dispose of an interest vested either in himself or in another person; ownership by appointment. --Wharton. 13. Hence, vested authority to act in a given case; as, the business was referred to a committee with power. Note: Power may be predicated of inanimate agents, like the winds and waves, electricity and magnetism, gravitation, etc., or of animal and intelligent beings; and when predicated of these beings, it may indicate physical, mental, or moral ability or capacity. Mechanical powers. See under Mechanical. Power loom, or Power press. See Def. 8 (d), note. Power of attorney. See under Attorney. Power of a point (relative to a given curve) (Geom.), the result of substituting the co["o]rdinates of any point in that expression which being put equal to zero forms the equation of the curve; as, x^2 + y^2 - 100 is the power of the point x, y, relative to the circle x^2 + y^2 - 100 = 0.
Mechanical powers
Mechanical Me*chan"ic*al, a. [From Mechanic, a.] 1. Pertaining to, governed by, or in accordance with, mechanics, or the laws of motion; pertaining to the quantitative relations of force and matter, as distinguished from mental, vital, chemical, etc.; as, mechanical principles; a mechanical theory; mechanical deposits. 2. Of or pertaining to a machine or to machinery or tools; made or formed by a machine or with tools; as, mechanical precision; mechanical products. We have also divers mechanical arts. --Bacon. 3. Done as if by a machine; uninfluenced by will or emotion; proceeding automatically, or by habit, without special intention or reflection; as, mechanical singing; mechanical verses; mechanical service. 4. Made and operated by interaction of forces without a directing intelligence; as, a mechanical universe. 5. Obtained by trial, by measurements, etc.; approximate; empirical. See the 2d Note under Geometric. Mechanical effect, effective power; useful work exerted, as by a machine, in a definite time. Mechanical engineering. See the Note under Engineering. Mechanical maneuvers (Mil.), the application of mechanical appliances to the mounting, dismounting, and moving of artillery. --Farrow. Mechanical philosophy, the principles of mechanics applied to the inverstigation of physical phenomena. Mechanical powers, certain simple instruments, such as the lever and its modifications (the wheel and axle and the pulley), the inclined plane with its modifications (the screw and the wedge), which convert a small force acting through a great space into a great force acting through a small space, or vice versa, and are used separately or in combination. Mechanical solution (Math.), a solution of a problem by any art or contrivance not strictly geometrical, as by means of the ruler and compasses, or other instruments.
Mechanical solution
Mechanical Me*chan"ic*al, a. [From Mechanic, a.] 1. Pertaining to, governed by, or in accordance with, mechanics, or the laws of motion; pertaining to the quantitative relations of force and matter, as distinguished from mental, vital, chemical, etc.; as, mechanical principles; a mechanical theory; mechanical deposits. 2. Of or pertaining to a machine or to machinery or tools; made or formed by a machine or with tools; as, mechanical precision; mechanical products. We have also divers mechanical arts. --Bacon. 3. Done as if by a machine; uninfluenced by will or emotion; proceeding automatically, or by habit, without special intention or reflection; as, mechanical singing; mechanical verses; mechanical service. 4. Made and operated by interaction of forces without a directing intelligence; as, a mechanical universe. 5. Obtained by trial, by measurements, etc.; approximate; empirical. See the 2d Note under Geometric. Mechanical effect, effective power; useful work exerted, as by a machine, in a definite time. Mechanical engineering. See the Note under Engineering. Mechanical maneuvers (Mil.), the application of mechanical appliances to the mounting, dismounting, and moving of artillery. --Farrow. Mechanical philosophy, the principles of mechanics applied to the inverstigation of physical phenomena. Mechanical powers, certain simple instruments, such as the lever and its modifications (the wheel and axle and the pulley), the inclined plane with its modifications (the screw and the wedge), which convert a small force acting through a great space into a great force acting through a small space, or vice versa, and are used separately or in combination. Mechanical solution (Math.), a solution of a problem by any art or contrivance not strictly geometrical, as by means of the ruler and compasses, or other instruments.
Mechanicalize
Mechanicalize Me*chan"ic*al*ize, v. t. To cause to become mechanical.
Mechanically
Mechanically Me*chan"ic*al*ly, adv. In a mechanical manner.
Mechanicalness
Mechanicalness Me*chan"ic*al*ness, n. The state or quality of being mechanical.
Mechanico-chemical
Mechanico-chemical Me*chan`i*co-chem"ic*al, a. Pertaining to, connected with, or dependent upon, both mechanics and chemistry; -- said especially of those sciences which treat of such phenomena as seem to depend on the laws both of mechanics and chemistry, as electricity and magnetism.
Photomechanical
Photomechanical Pho`to*me*chan"ic*al, a. Pertaining to, or designating, any photographic process in which a printing surface is obtained without the intervention of hand engraving.
Telemechanic
Telemechanic Tel`e*me*chan"ic, a. [Gr. th^le far + mechanic.] Designating, or pert. to, any device for operating mechanisms at a distance. -- Tel`e*mech"a*nism, n.

Meaning of Mechanic from wikipedia

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