Definition of Lose. Meaning of Lose. Synonyms of Lose

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Definition of Lose

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A closed sea
Close Close, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Closed; p. pr. & vb. n. Closing.] [From OF. & F. clos, p. p. of clore to close, fr. L. claudere; akin to G. schliessen to shut, and to E. clot, cloister, clavicle, conclude, sluice. Cf. Clause, n.] 1. To stop, or fill up, as an opening; to shut; as, to close the eyes; to close a door. 2. To bring together the parts of; to consolidate; as, to close the ranks of an army; -- often used with up. 3. To bring to an end or period; to conclude; to complete; to finish; to end; to consummate; as, to close a bargain; to close a course of instruction. One frugal supper did our studies close. --Dryden. 4. To come or gather around; to inclose; to encompass; to confine. The depth closed me round about. --Jonah ii. 5. But now thou dost thyself immure and close In some one corner of a feeble heart. --Herbert. A closed sea, a sea within the jurisdiction of some particular nation, which controls its navigation.
Alose
Alose A*lose", v. t. [OE. aloser.] To praise. [Obs.]
Alose
Alose A"lose, n. [F., fr. L. alosa or alausa.] (Zo["o]l.) The European shad (Clupea alosa); -- called also allice shad or allis shad. The name is sometimes applied to the American shad (Clupea sapidissima). See Shad.
Amylose
Amylose Am`y*lose", n. (Chem.) One of the starch group (C6H10O5)n of the carbohydrates; as, starch, arabin, dextrin, cellulose, etc.
Anchylose
Anchylose An"chy*lose, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. Anchylosed; p. pr. & vb. n. Anchylosing.] [Cf. F. ankyloser.] To affect or be affected with anchylosis; to unite or consolidate so as to make a stiff joint; to grow together into one. [Spelt also ankylose.] --Owen.
Anchylosed
Anchylose An"chy*lose, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. Anchylosed; p. pr. & vb. n. Anchylosing.] [Cf. F. ankyloser.] To affect or be affected with anchylosis; to unite or consolidate so as to make a stiff joint; to grow together into one. [Spelt also ankylose.] --Owen.
Angulose
Angulose An"gu*lose`, a. Angulous. [R.]
Anhelose
Anhelose An"he*lose, a. Anhelous; panting. [R.]
ankylose
Anchylose An"chy*lose, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. Anchylosed; p. pr. & vb. n. Anchylosing.] [Cf. F. ankyloser.] To affect or be affected with anchylosis; to unite or consolidate so as to make a stiff joint; to grow together into one. [Spelt also ankylose.] --Owen.
Ankylose
Ankylose An"ky*lose, v. t. & i. Same as Anchylose.
Annulose
Annulose An"nu*lose` (?; 277), a. [L. annulus ring.] 1. Furnished with, or composed of, rings or ringlike segments; ringed. 2. (Zo["o]l.) Of or pertaining to the Annulosa.
Bicallose
Bicallose Bi*cal"lose, Bicallous Bi*cal"lous, a. [Pref. bi- + callose, callous.] (Bot.) Having two callosities or hard spots. --Gray.
Boot closer
Boot Boot, n. [OE. bote, OF. bote, F. botte, LL. botta; of uncertain origin.] 1. A covering for the foot and lower part of the leg, ordinarily made of leather. 2. An instrument of torture for the leg, formerly used to extort confessions, particularly in Scotland. So he was put to the torture, which in Scotland they call the boots; for they put a pair of iron boots close on the leg, and drive wedges between them and the leg. --Bp. Burnet. 3. A place at the side of a coach, where attendants rode; also, a low outside place before and behind the body of the coach. [Obs.] 4. A place for baggage at either end of an old-fashioned stagecoach. 5. An apron or cover (of leather or rubber cloth) for the driving seat of a vehicle, to protect from rain and mud. 6. (Plumbing) The metal casing and flange fitted about a pipe where it passes through a roof. Boot catcher, the person at an inn whose business it was to pull off boots and clean them. [Obs.] --Swift. Boot closer, one who, or that which, sews the uppers of boots. Boot crimp, a frame or device used by bootmakers for drawing and shaping the body of a boot. Boot hook, a hook with a handle, used for pulling on boots. Boots and saddles (Cavalry Tactics), the trumpet call which is the first signal for mounted drill. Sly boots. See Slyboots, in the Vocabulary.
Callose
Callose Cal"lose, a. [See Callous.] (Bot.) Furnished with protuberant or hardened spots.
Capillose
Capillose Cap"il*lose`, a. [L. capillosus.] Having much hair; hairy. [R.]
Cellulose
Cellulose Cel"lu*lose` (s[e^]l"[-u]*l[=o]s`), a. Consisting of, or containing, cells.
Cellulose
Cellulose Cel"lu*lose`, n. (Chem.) The substance which constitutes the essential part of the solid framework of plants, of ordinary wood, linen, paper, etc. It is also found to a slight extent in certain animals, as the tunicates. It is a carbohydrate, (C6H10O5)n, isomeric with starch, and is convertible into starches and sugars by the action of heat and acids. When pure, it is a white amorphous mass. See Starch, Granulose, Lignin. Unsized, well bleached linen paper is merely pure cellulose. --Goodale. Starch cellulose, the delicate framework which remains when the soluble part (granulose) of starch is removed by saliva or pepsin. --Goodale.
Close
Close Close (? or ?), n. [OF. & F. clos an inclosure, fr. clos, p. p. of clore. See Close, v. t.] 1. An inclosed place; especially, a small field or piece of land surrounded by a wall, hedge, or fence of any kind; -- specifically, the precinct of a cathedral or abbey. Closes surrounded by the venerable abodes of deans and canons. --Macaulay. 2. A narrow passage leading from a street to a court, and the houses within. [Eng.] --Halliwell 3. (Law) The interest which one may have in a piece of ground, even though it is not inclosed. --Bouvier.
Close
Close Close, n. 1. The manner of shutting; the union of parts; junction. [Obs.] The doors of plank were; their close exquisite. --Chapman. 2. Conclusion; cessation; ending; end. His long and troubled life was drawing to a close. --Macaulay. 3. A grapple in wrestling. --Bacon. 4. (Mus.) (a) The conclusion of a strain of music; cadence. (b) A double bar marking the end. At every close she made, the attending throng Replied, and bore the burden of the song. --Dryden. Syn: Conclusion; termination; cessation; end; ending; extremity; extreme.
Close
Close Close, adv. 1. In a close manner. 2. Secretly; darkly. [Obs.] A wondrous vision which did close imply The course of all her fortune and posterity. --Spenser.
Close
Close Close, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Closed; p. pr. & vb. n. Closing.] [From OF. & F. clos, p. p. of clore to close, fr. L. claudere; akin to G. schliessen to shut, and to E. clot, cloister, clavicle, conclude, sluice. Cf. Clause, n.] 1. To stop, or fill up, as an opening; to shut; as, to close the eyes; to close a door. 2. To bring together the parts of; to consolidate; as, to close the ranks of an army; -- often used with up. 3. To bring to an end or period; to conclude; to complete; to finish; to end; to consummate; as, to close a bargain; to close a course of instruction. One frugal supper did our studies close. --Dryden. 4. To come or gather around; to inclose; to encompass; to confine. The depth closed me round about. --Jonah ii. 5. But now thou dost thyself immure and close In some one corner of a feeble heart. --Herbert. A closed sea, a sea within the jurisdiction of some particular nation, which controls its navigation.
Close corporation
Corporation Cor`po*ra"tion (k[^o]r`p[-o]*r[=a]"sh[u^]n), n. [L. corporatio incarnation: cf. F. corporation corporation.] A body politic or corporate, formed and authorized by law to act as a single person, and endowed by law with the capacity of succession; a society having the capacity of transacting business as an individual. Note: Corporations are aggregate or sole. Corporations aggregate consist of two or more persons united in a society, which is preserved by a succession of members, either forever or till the corporation is dissolved by the power that formed it, by the death of all its members, by surrender of its charter or franchises, or by forfeiture. Such corporations are the mayor and aldermen of cities, the head and fellows of a college, the dean and chapter of a cathedral church, the stockholders of a bank or insurance company, etc. A corporation sole consists of a single person, who is made a body corporate and politic, in order to give him some legal capacities, and especially that of succession, which as a natural person he can not have. Kings, bishops, deans, parsons, and vicars, are in England sole corporations. A fee will not pass to a corporation sole without the word ``successors' in the grant. There are instances in the United States of a minister of a parish seized of parsonage lands in the right of his parish, being a corporation sole, as in Massachusetts. Corporations are sometimes classified as public and private; public being convertible with municipal, and private corporations being all corporations not municipal. Close corporation. See under Close.
Close fertilization
Fertilization Fer`ti*li*za"tion, n. 1. The act or process of rendering fertile. 2. (Biol.) The act of fecundating or impregnating animal or vegetable germs; esp., the process by which in flowers the pollen renders the ovule fertile, or an analogous process in flowerless plants; fecundation; impregnation. Close fertilization (Bot.), the fertilization of pistils by pollen derived from the stamens of the same blossom. Cross fertilization, fertilization by pollen from some other blossom. See under Cross, a.
Close harmony
Harmony Har"mo*ny, n.; pl. Harmonies. [ F. harmonic, L. harmonia, Gr. ? joint, proportion, concord, fr. ? a fitting or joining. See Article. ] 1. The just adaptation of parts to each other, in any system or combination of things, or in things, or things intended to form a connected whole; such an agreement between the different parts of a design or composition as to produce unity of effect; as, the harmony of the universe. 2. Concord or agreement in facts, opinions, manners, interests, etc.; good correspondence; peace and friendship; as, good citizens live in harmony. 3. A literary work which brings together or arranges systematically parallel passages of historians respecting the same events, and shows their agreement or consistency; as, a harmony of the Gospels. 4. (Mus.) (a) A succession of chords according to the rules of progression and modulation. (b) The science which treats of their construction and progression. Ten thousand harps, that tuned Angelic harmonies. --Milton. 5. (Anat.) See Harmonic suture, under Harmonic. Close harmony, Dispersed harmony, etc. See under Close, Dispersed, etc. Harmony of the spheres. See Music of the spheres, under Music. Syn: Harmony, Melody. Usage: Harmony results from the concord of two or more strains or sounds which differ in pitch and quality. Melody denotes the pleasing alternation and variety of musical and measured sounds, as they succeed each other in a single verse or strain.
Close reef
Reef Reef, n. [Akin to D. reef, G. reff, Sw. ref; cf. Icel. rif reef, rifa to basten together. Cf. Reeve, v. t., River.] (Naut.) That part of a sail which is taken in or let out by means of the reef points, in order to adapt the size of the sail to the force of the wind. Note: From the head to the first reef-band, in square sails, is termed the first reef; from this to the next is the second reef; and so on. In fore-and-aft sails, which reef on the foot, the first reef is the lowest part. --Totten. Close reef, the last reef that can be put in. Reef band. See Reef-band in the Vocabulary. Reef knot, the knot which is used in tying reef pointss. See Illust. under Knot. Reef line, a small rope formerly used to reef the courses by being passed spirally round the yard and through the holes of the reef. --Totten. Reef points, pieces of small rope passing through the eyelet holes of a reef-band, and used reefing the sail. Reef tackle, a tackle by which the reef cringles, or rings, of a sail are hauled up to the yard for reefing. --Totten. To take a reef in, to reduce the size of (a sail) by folding or rolling up a reef, and lashing it to the spar.
Close vowel
Vowel Vow"el, n. [F. voyelle, or an OF. form without y, L. vocalis (sc. littera), from vocalis sounding, from vox, vocis, a voice, sound. See Vocal.] (Phon.) A vocal, or sometimes a whispered, sound modified by resonance in the oral passage, the peculiar resonance in each case giving to each several vowel its distinctive character or quality as a sound of speech; -- distinguished from a consonant in that the latter, whether made with or without vocality, derives its character in every case from some kind of obstructive action by the mouth organs. Also, a letter or character which represents such a sound. See Guide to Pronunciation, [sect][sect] 5, 146-149. Note: In the English language, the written vowels are a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes w and y. The spoken vowels are much more numerous. Close vowel. See under Close, a. Vowel point. See under Point, n.
Close-banded
Close-banded Close"-band`ed, a. Closely united.
Close-barred
Close-barred Close"-barred`, a. Firmly barred or closed.
Close-bodied
Close-bodied Close"-bod`ied, a. Fitting the body exactly; setting close, as a garment. --Ayliffe.
Closed
Close Close, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Closed; p. pr. & vb. n. Closing.] [From OF. & F. clos, p. p. of clore to close, fr. L. claudere; akin to G. schliessen to shut, and to E. clot, cloister, clavicle, conclude, sluice. Cf. Clause, n.] 1. To stop, or fill up, as an opening; to shut; as, to close the eyes; to close a door. 2. To bring together the parts of; to consolidate; as, to close the ranks of an army; -- often used with up. 3. To bring to an end or period; to conclude; to complete; to finish; to end; to consummate; as, to close a bargain; to close a course of instruction. One frugal supper did our studies close. --Dryden. 4. To come or gather around; to inclose; to encompass; to confine. The depth closed me round about. --Jonah ii. 5. But now thou dost thyself immure and close In some one corner of a feeble heart. --Herbert. A closed sea, a sea within the jurisdiction of some particular nation, which controls its navigation.

Meaning of Lose from wikipedia

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- How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days is a 2003 romantic comedy film directed by Donald Petrie, starring Kate Hudson and Matthew McConaughey. It is based on a short...
- "Just Lose It" is a song by American rapper Eminem from his fifth studio album, Encore (2004). It was released on September 28, 2004 as the lead single...
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