Definition of Script. Meaning of Script. Synonyms of Script

Definition of Script. Meaning of Script. Synonyms of Script

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Script. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Script and, of course, Script synonyms and on the right images related to the word Script.

Definition of Script

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Adscript
Adscript Ad"script, a. [L. adscriptus, p. p. of adscribere to enroll. See Ascribe.] Held to service as attached to the soil; -- said of feudal serfs.
Adscript
Adscript Ad"script, n. One held to service as attached to the glebe or estate; a feudal serf. --Bancroft.
Adscriptive
Adscriptive Ad*scrip"tive, a.[L. adscriptivus. See Adscript.] Attached or annexed to the glebe or estate and transferable with it. --Brougham.
Antiscriptural
Antiscriptural An`ti*scrip"tur*al, a. Opposed to, or not in accordance with, the Holy Scriptures.
Ascript
Ascript As"cript, a. See Adscript. [Obs.]
Ascription
Ascription As*crip"tion, n. [L. ascriptio, fr. ascribere. See Ascribe.] The act of ascribing, imputing, or affirming to belong; also, that which is ascribed.
Ascriptitious
Ascriptitious As`crip*ti"tious, a. [L. ascriptitius, fr. ascribere.] 1. Ascribed. 2. Added; additional. [Obs.] An ascriptitious and supernumerary God. --Farindon.
Canonical Scriptures
Canonic Ca*non"ic, Cannonical Can*non"ic*al, a. [L. cannonicus, LL. canonicalis, fr. L. canon: cf. F. canonique. See canon.] Of or pertaining to a canon; established by, or according to a, canon or canons. ``The oath of canonical obedience.' --Hallam. Canonical books, or Canonical Scriptures, those books which are declared by the canons of the church to be of divine inspiration; -- called collectively the canon. The Roman Catholic Church holds as canonical several books which Protestants reject as apocryphal. Canonical epistles, an appellation given to the epistles called also general or catholic. See Catholic epistles, under Canholic. Canonical form (Math.), the simples or most symmetrical form to which all functions of the same class can be reduced without lose of generality. Canonical hours, certain stated times of the day, fixed by ecclesiastical laws, and appropriated to the offices of prayer and devotion; also, certain portions of the Breviary, to be used at stated hours of the day. In England, this name is also given to the hours from 8 a. m. to 3 p. m. (formerly 8 a. m. to 12 m.) before and after which marriage can not be legally performed in any parish church. Canonical letters, letters of several kinds, formerly given by a bishop to traveling clergymen or laymen, to show that they were entitled to receive the communion, and to distinguish them from heretics. Canonical life, the method or rule of living prescribed by the ancient clergy who lived in community; a course of living prescribed for the clergy, less rigid than the monastic, and more restrained that the secular. Canonical obedience, submission to the canons of a church, especially the submission of the inferior clergy to their bishops, and of other religious orders to their superiors. Canonical punishments, such as the church may inflict, as excommunication, degradation, penance, etc. Canonical sins (Anc. Church.), those for which capital punishment or public penance decreed by the canon was inflicted, as idolatry, murder, adultery, heresy.
Circumscriptible
Circumscriptible Cir`cum*scrip"ti*ble, a. Capable of being circumscribed or limited by bounds.
Circumscription
Circumscription Cir`cum*scrip"tion, n. [L. circumscriptio. See Circumscribe.] 1. An inscription written around anything. [R.] --Ashmole. 2. The exterior line which determines the form or magnitude of a body; outline; periphery. --Ray. 3. The act of limiting, or the state of being limited, by conditions or restraints; bound; confinement; limit. The circumscriptions of terrestrial nature. --Johnson. I would not my unhoused, free condition Put into circumscription and confine. --Shak.
Circumscriptive
Circumscriptive Cir`cum*scrip"tive, a. Circumscribing or tending to circumscribe; marcing the limits or form of.
Circumscriptively
Circumscriptively Cir`cum*scrip"tive*ly, adv. In a limited manner.
Circumscriptly
Circumscriptly Cir"cum*script`ly, adv. In a literal, limited, or narrow manner. [R.] --Milton.
Conscript
Conscript Con"script, n. One taken by lot, or compulsorily enrolled, to serve as a soldier or sailor.
Conscript
Conscript Con*script", v. t. To enroll, by compulsion, for military service.
Conscript
Conscript Con"script, a. [L. conscriptus, p. p. of conscribere to write together, to enroll; con- + scribere to write. See Scribe.] Enrolled; written; registered. Conscript fathers (Rom. Antiq.), the senators of ancient Rome. When certain new senators were first enrolled with the ``fathers' the body was called Patres et Conscripti; afterward all were called Patres conscripti.
Conscript fathers
Conscript Con"script, a. [L. conscriptus, p. p. of conscribere to write together, to enroll; con- + scribere to write. See Scribe.] Enrolled; written; registered. Conscript fathers (Rom. Antiq.), the senators of ancient Rome. When certain new senators were first enrolled with the ``fathers' the body was called Patres et Conscripti; afterward all were called Patres conscripti.
Conscript fathers etc
Father Fa"ther, n. [OE. fader, AS. f[ae]der; akin to OS. fadar, D. vader, OHG. fatar, G. vater, Icel. Fa?ir Sw. & Dan. fader, OIr. athir, L. pater, Gr. ?????, Skr. pitr, perh. fr. Skr. p[=a] protect. ???,???. Cf. Papa, Paternal, Patriot, Potential, Pablum.] 1. One who has begotten a child, whether son or daughter; a generator; a male parent. A wise son maketh a glad father. --Prov. x. 1. 2. A male ancestor more remote than a parent; a progenitor; especially, a first ancestor; a founder of a race or family; -- in the plural, fathers, ancestors. David slept with his fathers. --1 Kings ii. 10. Abraham, who is the father of us all. --Rom. iv. 16. 3. One who performs the offices of a parent by maintenance, affetionate care, counsel, or protection. I was a father to the poor. --Job xxix. 16. He hath made me a father to Pharaoh, and lord of all his house. --Gen. xiv. 8. 4. A respectful mode of address to an old man. And Joash the king og Israel came down unto him [Elisha], . . . and said, O my father, my father! --2 Kings xiii. 14. 5. A senator of ancient Rome. 6. A dignitary of the church, a superior of a convent, a confessor (called also father confessor), or a priest; also, the eldest member of a profession, or of a legislative assembly, etc. Bless you, good father friar ! --Shak. 7. One of the chief esslesiastical authorities of the first centuries after Christ; -- often spoken of collectively as the Fathers; as, the Latin, Greek, or apostolic Fathers. 8. One who, or that which, gives origin; an originator; a producer, author, or contriver; the first to practice any art, profession, or occupation; a distinguished example or teacher. The father of all such as handle the harp and organ. --Gen. iv. 21. Might be the father, Harry, to that thought. --Shak. The father of good news. --Shak. 9. The Supreme Being and Creator; God; in theology, the first person in the Trinity. Our Father, which art in heaven. --Matt. vi. 9. Now had the almighty Father from above . . . Bent down his eye. --Milton. Adoptive father, one who adopts the child of another, treating it as his own. Apostolic father, Conscript fathers, etc. See under Apostolic, Conscript, etc. Father in God, a title given to bishops. Father of lies, the Devil. Father of the bar, the oldest practitioner at the bar. Fathers of the city, the aldermen. Father of the Faithful. (a) Abraham. --Rom. iv. --Gal. iii. 6-9. (b) Mohammed, or one of the sultans, his successors. Father of the house, the member of a legislative body who has had the longest continuous service. Most Reverend Father in God, a title given to archbishops and metropolitans, as to the archbishops of Canterbury and York. Natural father, the father of an illegitimate child. Putative father, one who is presumed to be the father of an illegitimate child; the supposed father. Spiritual father. (a) A religious teacher or guide, esp. one instrumental in leading a soul to God. (b) (R. C. Ch.) A priest who hears confession in the sacrament of penance. The Holy Father (R. C. Ch.), the pope.
Conscription
Conscription Con*scrip"tion, n. [L. conscriptio: cf. F. conscription.] 1. An enrolling or registering. The conscription of men of war. --Bp. Burnet. 2. A compulsory enrollment of men for military or naval service; a draft.
Conscription
Conscription Con*scrip"tion, a. Belonging to, or of the nature of, a conspiration.
Description
Description De*scrip"tion, n. [F. description, L. descriptio. See Describe.] 1. The act of describing; a delineation by marks or signs. 2. A sketch or account of anything in words; a portraiture or representation in language; an enumeration of the essential qualities of a thing or species. Milton has descriptions of morning. --D. Webster. 3. A class to which a certain representation is applicable; kind; sort. A difference . . . between them and another description of public creditors. --A. Hamilton. The plates were all of the meanest description. --Macaulay. Syn: Account; definition; recital; relation; detail; narrative; narration; explanation; delineation; representation; kind; sort. See Definition.
Descriptive
Descriptive De*scrip"tive, a. [L. descriptivus: cf. F. descriptif.] Tending to describe; having the quality of representing; containing description; as, a descriptive figure; a descriptive phrase; a descriptive narration; a story descriptive of the age. Descriptive anatomy, that part of anatomy which treats of the forms and relations of parts, but not of their textures. Descriptive geometry, that branch of geometry. which treats of the graphic solution of problems involving three dimensions, by means of projections upon auxiliary planes. --Davies & Peck (Math. Dict. ) -- De*scrip"tive*ly, adv. -- De*scrip"tive*ness, n.
Descriptive anatomy
Descriptive De*scrip"tive, a. [L. descriptivus: cf. F. descriptif.] Tending to describe; having the quality of representing; containing description; as, a descriptive figure; a descriptive phrase; a descriptive narration; a story descriptive of the age. Descriptive anatomy, that part of anatomy which treats of the forms and relations of parts, but not of their textures. Descriptive geometry, that branch of geometry. which treats of the graphic solution of problems involving three dimensions, by means of projections upon auxiliary planes. --Davies & Peck (Math. Dict. ) -- De*scrip"tive*ly, adv. -- De*scrip"tive*ness, n.
Descriptive geometry
Descriptive De*scrip"tive, a. [L. descriptivus: cf. F. descriptif.] Tending to describe; having the quality of representing; containing description; as, a descriptive figure; a descriptive phrase; a descriptive narration; a story descriptive of the age. Descriptive anatomy, that part of anatomy which treats of the forms and relations of parts, but not of their textures. Descriptive geometry, that branch of geometry. which treats of the graphic solution of problems involving three dimensions, by means of projections upon auxiliary planes. --Davies & Peck (Math. Dict. ) -- De*scrip"tive*ly, adv. -- De*scrip"tive*ness, n.
Descriptively
Descriptive De*scrip"tive, a. [L. descriptivus: cf. F. descriptif.] Tending to describe; having the quality of representing; containing description; as, a descriptive figure; a descriptive phrase; a descriptive narration; a story descriptive of the age. Descriptive anatomy, that part of anatomy which treats of the forms and relations of parts, but not of their textures. Descriptive geometry, that branch of geometry. which treats of the graphic solution of problems involving three dimensions, by means of projections upon auxiliary planes. --Davies & Peck (Math. Dict. ) -- De*scrip"tive*ly, adv. -- De*scrip"tive*ness, n.
Descriptiveness
Descriptive De*scrip"tive, a. [L. descriptivus: cf. F. descriptif.] Tending to describe; having the quality of representing; containing description; as, a descriptive figure; a descriptive phrase; a descriptive narration; a story descriptive of the age. Descriptive anatomy, that part of anatomy which treats of the forms and relations of parts, but not of their textures. Descriptive geometry, that branch of geometry. which treats of the graphic solution of problems involving three dimensions, by means of projections upon auxiliary planes. --Davies & Peck (Math. Dict. ) -- De*scrip"tive*ly, adv. -- De*scrip"tive*ness, n.
Escript
Escript Es"cript, n. [OF.] A writing. [Obs.]
Exscript
Exscript Ex"script, n. [L. exscriptus, p. p. of exscribere.] A copy; a transcript. [Obs.] --Bailey.
Exscriptural
Exscriptural Ex*scrip"tur*al (?; 135), a. [Pref. ex-+scriptural.] Not in accordance with the doctrines of Scripture; unscriptural.
Imprescriptible
Imprescriptible Im`pre*scrip"ti*ble, a. [Pref. im- not + prescriptible: cf. F. imprescriptible.] 1. Not capable of being lost or impaired by neglect, by disuse, or by the claims of another founded on prescription. The right of navigation, fishing, and others that may be exercised on the sea, belonging to the right of mere ability, are imprescriptible. --Vattel (Trans. ) 2. Not derived from, or dependent on, external authority; self-evidencing; obvious. The imprescriptible laws of the pure reason. --Colerridge.

Meaning of Script from wikipedia

- Script may refer to: Script (Unicode), collections of letters and other written signs, each ****igned to a Unicode number Script, a distinctive writing...
- The Script are an Irish pop band formed in 2007 in Dublin, Ireland. It consists of lead vocalist and keyboardist Daniel O'Donoghue, lead guitarist Mark...
- The Cyrillic script /sɪˈrɪlɪk/ is a writing system used for various alphabets across Eurasia, particularly in Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, Central Asia...
- JavaScript (/ˈdʒɑːvəˌskrɪpt/), often abbreviated as JS, is a high-level, interpreted programming language. It is a language which is also characterized...
- AtScript was a proposed JavaScript-based scripting language extending Microsoft's TypeScript and transcompiling to JavaScript. It was introduced in October...
- Brahmic script modified, standardized and used by the second Sikh Guru, Guru Angad (1504–1552). It is used by Indian Punjabis as one of two scripts to write...
- In programming and hacking culture, a script kiddie or skiddie is an unskilled individual who uses scripts or programs developed by others to attack computer...
- Latin or Roman script is a set of graphic signs (script) based on the letters of the cl****ical Latin alphabet. This is derived from a form of the ****aean...
- symbols. It evolved into a host of other scripts that continue in use. Brahmi is related to the ancient Kharoṣṭhī script, which was used in what is now eastern...
- Malayalam script (Malayāḷalipi; IPA: [mələjɑːɭə lɪpɪ] ( listen) / Malayalam: മലയാളലിപി) is a Brahmic script used commonly to write the Malayalam language...
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