Definition of Lorus. Meaning of Lorus. Synonyms of Lorus

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Definition of Lorus

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Ceanothus thyrsiflorus
Lilac Li"lac (l[imac]"lak), n. [Also lilach.] [Sp. lilac, lila, Ar. l[=i]lak, fr. Per. l[=i]laj, l[=i]lanj, l[=i]lang, n[=i]laj, n[=i]l, the indigo plant, or from the kindred l[=i]lak bluish, the flowers being named from the color. Cf. Anil.] 1. (Bot.) A shrub of the genus Syringa. There are six species, natives of Europe and Asia. Syringa vulgaris, the common lilac, and S. Persica, the Persian lilac, are frequently cultivated for the fragrance and beauty of their purplish or white flowers. In the British colonies various other shrubs have this name. 2. A light purplish color like that of the flower of the purplish lilac. California lilac (Bot.), a low shrub with dense clusters of purplish flowers (Ceanothus thyrsiflorus).
Cereus grandiflorus
Cereus Ce"re*us, n. [L., a wax candle, fr. cera wax. So named from the resemblance of one species to the columnar shape of a wax candle.] (Bot.) A genus of plants of the Cactus family. They are natives of America, from California to Chili. Note: Although several species flower in the night, the name Night-blooming cereus is specially applied to the Cereus grandiflorus, which is cultivated for its beautiful, shortlived flowers. The Cereus giganteus, whose columnar trunk is sometimes sixty feet in height, is a striking feature of the scenery of New Mexico, Texas, etc.
Citriobatus parviflorus
Orange Or"ange, n. [F.; cf. It. arancia, arancio, LL. arangia, Sp. naranjia, Pg. laranja; all fr. Ar. n[=a]ranj, Per. n[=a]ranj, n[=a]rang; cf. Skr. n[=a]ranga orange tree. The o- in F. orange is due to confusion with or gold, L. aurum, because the orange resembles gold in color.] 1. The fruit of a tree of the genus Citrus (C. Aurantium). It is usually round, and consists of pulpy carpels, commonly ten in number, inclosed in a leathery rind, which is easily separable, and is reddish yellow when ripe. Note: There are numerous varieties of oranges; as, the bitter orange, which is supposed to be the original stock; the navel orange, which has the rudiment of a second orange imbedded in the top of the fruit; the blood orange, with a reddish juice; and the horned orange, in which the carpels are partly separated. 2. (Bot.) The tree that bears oranges; the orange tree. 3. The color of an orange; reddish yellow. Mandarin orange. See Mandarin. Mock orange (Bot.), any species of shrubs of the genus Philadelphus, which have whitish and often fragrant blossoms. Native orange, or Orange thorn (Bot.), an Australian shrub (Citriobatus parviflorus); also, its edible yellow berries. Orange bird (Zo["o]l.), a tanager of Jamaica (Tanagra zena); -- so called from its bright orange breast. Orange cowry (Zo["o]l.), a large, handsome cowry (Cypr[ae]a aurantia), highly valued by collectors of shells on account of its rarity. Orange grass (Bot.), an inconspicuous annual American plant (Hypericum Sarothra), having minute, deep yellow flowers. Orange oil (Chem.), an oily, terpenelike substance obtained from orange rind, and distinct from neroli oil, which is obtained from the flowers. Orange pekoe, a kind of black tea. Orange pippin, an orange-colored apple with acid flavor. Quito orange, the orangelike fruit of a shrubby species of nightshade (Solanum Quitoense), native in Quito. Orange scale (Zo["o]l.) any species of scale insects which infests orange trees; especially, the purple scale (Mytilaspis citricola), the long scale (M. Gloveri), and the red scale (Aspidiotus Aurantii).
N biflorus
Primrose Prim"rose`, n. [OE. primerole, F. primerole, a derivative fr. LL. primula, from L. primus first. See Prime, a.] (Bot.) (a) An early flowering plant of the genus Primula (P. vulgaris) closely allied to the cowslip. There are several varieties, as the white-, the red-, the yellow-flowered, etc. Formerly called also primerole, primerolles. (b) Any plant of the genus Primula. Evening primrose, an erect biennial herb (Enothera biennis), with yellow vespertine flowers, common in the United States. The name is sometimes extended to other species of the same genus. Primrose peerless, the two-flowered Narcissus (N. biflorus). [Obs.]
Phaseolus multiflorus
Scarlet Scar"let, a. Of the color called scarlet; as, a scarlet cloth or thread. Scarlet admiral (Zo["o]l.), the red admiral. See under Red. -- Scarlet bean (Bot.), a kind of bean (Phaseolus multiflorus) having scarlet flowers; scarlet runner. Scarlet fever (Med.), a contagious febrile disease characterized by inflammation of the fauces and a scarlet rash, appearing usually on the second day, and ending in desquamation about the sixth or seventh day. Scarlet fish (Zo["o]l.), the telescope fish; -- so called from its red color. See under Telescope. Scarlet ibis (Zo["o]l.) See under Ibis. Scarlet maple (Bot.), the red maple. See Maple. Scarlet mite (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of bright red carnivorous mites found among grass and moss, especially Thombidium holosericeum and allied species. The young are parasitic upon spiders and insects. Scarlet oak (Bot.), a species of oak (Quercus coccinea) of the United States; -- so called from the scarlet color of its leaves in autumn. Scarlet runner (Bot.), the scarlet bean. Scarlet tanager. (Zo["o]l.) See under Tanager.
Pylorus
Pylorus Py*lo"rus, n.; pl. Pylori. [L., fr. Gr. ? pylorus, gate keeper; ? a gate + ? watcher, guardian.] (Anat.) (a) The opening from the stomach into the intestine. (b) A posterior division of the stomach in some invertebrates.

Meaning of Lorus from wikipedia

- for the distribution of Seiko watches and clocks, as well as Pulsar and Lorus brand watches, in the United States. The models available in the United...
- Lorus Bishop Pratt (November 27, 1855, Tooele, Utah – December 29, 1923, Salt Lake City) was an American landscape painter and missionary. In 1890, he...
- Merriam-Webster Dictionary". Merriam-Webster. Retrieved 25 December 2013. Milne, Lorus Johnson; Milne, Margery Joan Greene (1975). Living plants of the world....
- Jerusalem Cricket: It's Really Just a Potato Bug". Retrieved 2018-02-19. Milne, Lorus and Margery (1980) The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Insects...
- watches. Kinetic technology has also been used in some of Seiko's Pulsar and Lorus watches. As of 2007, Seiko has sold more than eight million automatic quartz...
- Werdelin Lip Peter Litherland Locman Longines Lorenz Watches Luch Luminox Lorus Maitres du Temps Manistee Watch Manufacture royale Marc Ecko Mathey-Tissot...
- Extension. Mud Daubers Genus Sceliphron Potter wasp Tropical Hover Wasp Milne, Lorus; Milne, Margery (August 2003) [Originally Published October 1st 1980]. Field...
- Bugs Britannica. Chatto and Windus. p. 189. ISBN 978-0-7011-8180-2. Milne, Lorus; Milne, Margery (1992). The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American...
- designers throughout the years, including Timex, Elgin, Helbros, Bradley, Lorus, and Gérald Genta The fictional character Robert Langdon from Dan Brown's...
- converted to Christianity. On the day of his baptism, Mirat took on the name of Lorus, which was given to the town, now known as Lourdes. Little is known of Lourdes...
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