Definition of Linus. Meaning of Linus. Synonyms of Linus

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Linus. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Linus and, of course, Linus synonyms and on the right images related to the word Linus.

Definition of Linus

No result for Linus. Showing similar results...

Bromus secalinus
Bunch grass, grazing. Far West. Eriocoma, Festuca, Stips, etc. Chess, or Cheat, a weed. Bromus secalinus, etc. Couch grass. Same as Quick grass (below). Crab grass, (a) Hay, in South. A weed, in North. Panicum sanguinale. (b) Pasture and hay. South. Eleusine Indica. Darnel (a) Bearded, a noxious weed. Lolium temulentum. (b) Common. Same as Rye grass (below). Drop seed, fair for forage and hay. Muhlenbergia, several species. English grass. Same as Redtop (below). Fowl meadow grass. (a) Pasture and hay. Poa serotina. (b) Hay, on moist land. Gryceria nervata. Gama grass, cut fodder. South. Tripsacum dactyloides.
Bulinus hypnorum
Pouch-shell Pouch"-shell`, n. (Zo["o]l.) A small British and American pond snail (Bulinus hypnorum).
Colinus or Ortyx Virginianus
Bobwhite Bob"white`, n. (Zo["o]l.) The common quail of North America (Colinus, or Ortyx, Virginianus); -- so called from its note.
Colinus Virginianus
Partridge Par"tridge, n. [OE. partriche, pertriche, OF. pertris, perdriz, F. perdrix, L. perdix, -icis, fr. Gr. ?.] (Zo["o]l.) 1. Any one of numerous species of small gallinaceous birds of the genus Perdix and several related genera of the family Perdicid[ae], of the Old World. The partridge is noted as a game bird. Full many a fat partrich had he in mew. --Chaucer. Note: The common European, or gray, partridge (Perdix cinerea) and the red-legged partridge (Caccabis rubra) of Southern Europe and Asia are well-known species. 2. Any one of several species of quail-like birds belonging to Colinus, and allied genera. [U.S.] Note: Among them are the bobwhite (Colinus Virginianus) of the Eastern States; the plumed, or mountain, partridge (Oreortyx pictus) of California; the Massena partridge (Cyrtonyx Montezum[ae]); and the California partridge (Callipepla Californica). 3. The ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus). [New Eng.] Bamboo partridge (Zo["o]l.), a spurred partridge of the genus Bambusicola. Several species are found in China and the East Indies. Night partridge (Zo["o]l.), the woodcock. [Local, U.S.] Painted partridge (Zo["o]l.), a francolin of South Africa (Francolinus pictus). Partridge berry. (Bot.) (a) The scarlet berry of a trailing american plant (Mitchella repens) of the order Rubiace[ae], having roundish evergreen leaves, and white fragrant flowers sometimes tinged with purple, growing in pairs with the ovaries united, and producing the berries which remain over winter; also, the plant itself. (b) The fruit of the creeping wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens); also, the plant itself. Partridge dove (Zo["o]l.) Same as Mountain witch, under Mountain. Partridge pea (Bot.), a yellow-flowered leguminous herb (Cassia Cham[ae]crista), common in sandy fields in the Eastern United States. Partridge shell (Zo["o]l.), a large marine univalve shell (Dolium perdix), having colors variegated like those of the partridge. Partridge wood (a) A variegated wood, much esteemed for cabinetwork. It is obtained from tropical America, and one source of it is said to be the leguminous tree Andira inermis. Called also pheasant wood. (b) A name sometimes given to the dark-colored and striated wood of some kind of palm, which is used for walking sticks and umbrella handles. Sea partridge (Zo["o]l.), an Asiatic sand partridge (Ammoperdix Bonhami); -- so called from its note. Snow partridge (Zo["o]l.), a large spurred partridge (Lerwa nivicola) which inhabits the high mountains of Asia. Spruce partridge. See under Spruce. Wood partridge, or Hill partridge (Zo["o]l.), any small Asiatic partridge of the genus Arboricola.
Elaps corallinus
Coral Cor"al, n. [Of. coral, F, corail, L. corallum, coralium, fr. Gr. kora`llion.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) The hard parts or skeleton of various Anthozoa, and of a few Hydrozoa. Similar structures are also formed by some Bryozoa. Note: The large stony corals forming coral reefs belong to various genera of Madreporaria, and to the hydroid genus, Millepora. The red coral, used in jewelry, is the stony axis of the stem of a gorgonian (Corallium rubrum) found chiefly in the Mediterranean. The fan corals, plume corals, and sea feathers are species of Gorgoniacea, in which the axis is horny. Organ-pipe coral is formed by the genus Tubipora, an Alcyonarian, and black coral is in part the axis of species of the genus Antipathes. See Anthozoa, Madrepora. 2. The ovaries of a cooked lobster; -- so called from their color. 3. A piece of coral, usually fitted with small bells and other appurtenances, used by children as a plaything. Brain coral, or Brain stone coral. See under Brain. Chain coral. See under Chain. Coral animal (Zo["o]l.), one of the polyps by which corals are formed. They are often very erroneously called coral insects. Coral fish. See in the Vocabulary. Coral reefs (Phys. Geog.), reefs, often of great extent, made up chiefly of fragments of corals, coral sands, and the solid limestone resulting from their consolidation. They are classed as fringing reefs, when they border the land; barrier reefs, when separated from the shore by a broad belt of water; atolls, when they constitute separate islands, usually inclosing a lagoon. See Atoll. Coral root (Bot.), a genus (Corallorhiza) of orchideous plants, of a yellowish or brownish red color, parasitic on roots of other plants, and having curious jointed or knotted roots not unlike some kinds of coral. See Illust. under Coralloid. Coral snake. (Zo) (a) A small, venomous, Brazilian snake (Elaps corallinus), coral-red, with black bands. (b) A small, harmless, South American snake (Tortrix scytale). Coral tree (Bot.), a tropical, leguminous plant, of several species, with showy, scarlet blossoms and coral-red seeds. The best known is Erythrina Corallodendron. Coral wood, a hard, red cabinet wood. --McElrath.
Francolinus pictus
Partridge Par"tridge, n. [OE. partriche, pertriche, OF. pertris, perdriz, F. perdrix, L. perdix, -icis, fr. Gr. ?.] (Zo["o]l.) 1. Any one of numerous species of small gallinaceous birds of the genus Perdix and several related genera of the family Perdicid[ae], of the Old World. The partridge is noted as a game bird. Full many a fat partrich had he in mew. --Chaucer. Note: The common European, or gray, partridge (Perdix cinerea) and the red-legged partridge (Caccabis rubra) of Southern Europe and Asia are well-known species. 2. Any one of several species of quail-like birds belonging to Colinus, and allied genera. [U.S.] Note: Among them are the bobwhite (Colinus Virginianus) of the Eastern States; the plumed, or mountain, partridge (Oreortyx pictus) of California; the Massena partridge (Cyrtonyx Montezum[ae]); and the California partridge (Callipepla Californica). 3. The ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus). [New Eng.] Bamboo partridge (Zo["o]l.), a spurred partridge of the genus Bambusicola. Several species are found in China and the East Indies. Night partridge (Zo["o]l.), the woodcock. [Local, U.S.] Painted partridge (Zo["o]l.), a francolin of South Africa (Francolinus pictus). Partridge berry. (Bot.) (a) The scarlet berry of a trailing american plant (Mitchella repens) of the order Rubiace[ae], having roundish evergreen leaves, and white fragrant flowers sometimes tinged with purple, growing in pairs with the ovaries united, and producing the berries which remain over winter; also, the plant itself. (b) The fruit of the creeping wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens); also, the plant itself. Partridge dove (Zo["o]l.) Same as Mountain witch, under Mountain. Partridge pea (Bot.), a yellow-flowered leguminous herb (Cassia Cham[ae]crista), common in sandy fields in the Eastern United States. Partridge shell (Zo["o]l.), a large marine univalve shell (Dolium perdix), having colors variegated like those of the partridge. Partridge wood (a) A variegated wood, much esteemed for cabinetwork. It is obtained from tropical America, and one source of it is said to be the leguminous tree Andira inermis. Called also pheasant wood. (b) A name sometimes given to the dark-colored and striated wood of some kind of palm, which is used for walking sticks and umbrella handles. Sea partridge (Zo["o]l.), an Asiatic sand partridge (Ammoperdix Bonhami); -- so called from its note. Snow partridge (Zo["o]l.), a large spurred partridge (Lerwa nivicola) which inhabits the high mountains of Asia. Spruce partridge. See under Spruce. Wood partridge, or Hill partridge (Zo["o]l.), any small Asiatic partridge of the genus Arboricola.
Lepilemur mustelinus
Weasel Wea"sel, n. [OE. wesele, AS. wesle; akin to D. wezel, G. wiesel, OHG. wisala, Icel. hreyiv[=i]sla, Dan. v["a]sel, Sw. vessla; of uncertain origin; cf. Gr. ?, ?, cat, weasel.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of various species of small carnivores belonging to the genus Putorius, as the ermine and ferret. They have a slender, elongated body, and are noted for the quickness of their movements and for their bloodthirsty habit in destroying poultry, rats, etc. The ermine and some other species are brown in summer, and turn white in winter; others are brown at all seasons. Malacca weasel, the rasse. Weasel coot, a female or young male of the smew; -- so called from the resemblance of the head to that of a weasel. Called also weasel duck. Weasel lemur, a short-tailed lemur (Lepilemur mustelinus). It is reddish brown above, grayish brown below, with the throat white.
M Carolinus
Woodpecker Wood"peck`er, n. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of scansorial birds belonging to Picus and many allied genera of the family Picid[ae]. Note: These birds have the tail feathers pointed and rigid at the tip to aid in climbing, and a strong chisellike bill with which they are able to drill holes in the bark and wood of trees in search of insect larv[ae] upon which most of the species feed. A few species feed partly upon the sap of trees (see Sap sucker, under Sap), others spend a portion of their time on the ground in search of ants and other insects. The most common European species are the greater spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopus major), the lesser spotted woodpecker (D. minor), and the green woodpecker, or yaffle (see Yaffle). The best-known American species are the pileated woodpecker (see under Pileated), the ivory-billed woodpecker (Campephilus principalis), which is one of the largest known species, the red-headed woodpecker, or red-head (Melanerpes erythrocephalus), the red-bellied woodpecker (M. Carolinus) (see Chab), the superciliary woodpecker (M. superciliaris), the hairy woodpecker (Dryobates villosus), the downy woodpecker (D. pubescens), the three-toed, woodpecker (Picoides Americanus), the golden-winged woodpecker (see Flicker), and the sap suckers. See also Carpintero. Woodpecker hornbill (Zo["o]l.), a black and white Asiatic hornbill (Buceros pica) which resembles a woodpecker in color.
Melanerpes Carolinus
Chab Chab, n. (Zo["o]l.) The red-bellied wood pecker (Melanerpes Carolinus).
P betulinus
Polyporus Po*lyp"o*rus, n.; pl. Polypori. [NL., fr. Gr. poly`s many + ? a pore.] (Bot.) A genus of fungi having the under surface full of minute pores; also, any fungus of this genus. Note: Polyporus fomentarius was formerly dried and cut in slices for tinder, called amadou. P. betulinus is common in America, and forms very large thick white semicircular excrescences on birch trees. Several species of Polyporous are considered edible.
Parus or AEgithalus pendulinus
Penduline Pen"du`line, n. [F. See Pendulum.] (Zo["o]l.) A European titmouse (Parus, or [AE]githalus, pendulinus). It is noted for its elegant pendulous purselike nest, made of the down of willow trees and lined with feathers.
Pterocarpus santalinus
Sandalwood San"dal*wood, n. [F. sandal, santal, fr. Ar. [,c]andal, or Gr. sa`ntalon; both ultimately fr. Skr. candana. Cf. Sanders.] (Bot.) (a) The highly perfumed yellowish heartwood of an East Indian and Polynesian tree (Santalum album), and of several other trees of the same genus, as the Hawaiian Santalum Freycinetianum and S. pyrularium, the Australian S. latifolium, etc. The name is extended to several other kinds of fragrant wood. (b) Any tree of the genus Santalum, or a tree which yields sandalwood. (c) The red wood of a kind of buckthorn, used in Russia for dyeing leather (Rhamnus Dahuricus). False sandalwood, the fragrant wood of several trees not of the genus Santalum, as Ximenia Americana, Myoporum tenuifolium of Tahiti. Red sandalwood, a heavy, dark red dyewood, being the heartwood of two leguminous trees of India (Pterocarpus santalinus, and Adenanthera pavonina); -- called also red sanderswood, sanders or saunders, and rubywood.
Pterocarpus santalinus
Redwood Red"wood` (-w[oo^]d`), n. (Bot.) (a) A gigantic coniferous tree (Sequoia sempervirens) of California, and its light and durable reddish timber. See Sequoia. (b) An East Indian dyewood, obtained from Pterocarpus santalinus, C[ae]salpinia Sappan, and several other trees. Note: The redwood of Andaman is Pterocarpus dalbergioides; that of some parts of tropical America, several species of Erythoxylum; that of Brazil, the species of Humirium.
Salmo or Salvelinus hucho
Huch Huch, Huchen Hu"chen, n. [G.] (Zo["o]l.) A large salmon (Salmo, or Salvelinus, hucho) inhabiting the Danube; -- called also huso, and bull trout.
Salvelinus alpinus
Saibling Sai"bling, n. [Dial. G.] (Zo["o]l.) A European mountain trout (Salvelinus alpinus); -- called also Bavarian charr.
Salvelinus fontinalis
Note: The most important European species are the river, or brown, trout (Salmo fario), the salmon trout, and the sewen. The most important American species are the brook, speckled, or red-spotted, trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) of the Northern United States and Canada; the red-spotted trout, or Dolly Varden (see Malma); the lake trout (see Namaycush); the black-spotted, mountain, or silver, trout (Salmo purpuratus); the golden, or rainbow, trout (see under Rainbow); the blueback trout (see Oquassa); and the salmon trout (see under Salmon.) The European trout has been introduced into America. 2. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of marine fishes more or less resembling a trout in appearance or habits, but not belonging to the same family, especially the California rock trouts, the common squeteague, and the southern, or spotted, squeteague; -- called also salt-water trout, sea trout, shad trout, and gray trout. See Squeteague, and Rock trout under Rock. Trout perch (Zo["o]l.), a small fresh-water American fish (Percopsis guttatus), allied to the trout, but resembling a perch in its scales and mouth.
Salvelinus fontinalis
Char Char, Charr Charr, n. [Ir. cear, Gael. ceara, lit., red, blood-colored, fr. cear blood. So named from its red belly.] (Zo["o]l.) One of the several species of fishes of the genus Salvelinus, allied to the spotted trout and salmon, inhabiting deep lakes in mountainous regions in Europe. In the United States, the brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) is sometimes called a char.
Salvelinus malma
Malma Mal"ma, n. (Zo["o]l.) A spotted trout (Salvelinus malma), inhabiting Northern America, west of the Rocky Mountains; -- called also Dolly Varden trout, bull trout, red-spotted trout, and golet.
Salvelinus malma
Bull trout Bull" trout` (Zo["o]l.) (a) In England, a large salmon trout of several species, as Salmo trutta and S. Cambricus, which ascend rivers; -- called also sea trout. (b) Salvelinus malma of California and Oregon; -- called also Dolly Varden trout and red-spotted trout. (c) The huso or salmon of the Danube.
Salvelinus namaycush
Namaycush Nam"ay*cush, n. [Indian name.] (Zool.) A large North American lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush). It is usually spotted with red, and sometimes weighs over forty pounds. Called also Mackinaw trout, lake trout, lake salmon, salmon trout, togue, and tuladi.
Salvelinus oquassa
Oquassa O*quas"sa, n. (Zo["o]l.) A small, handsome trout (Salvelinus oquassa), found in some of the lakes in Maine; -- called also blueback trout.
Scolecophagus Carolinus
Grackle Grac"kle, n. [Cf. L. graculus jackdaw.] (Zo["o]l.) (a) One of several American blackbirds, of the family Icterid[ae]; as, the rusty grackle (Scolecophagus Carolinus); the boat-tailed grackle (see Boat-tail); the purple grackle (Quiscalus quiscula, or Q. versicolor). See Crow blackbird, under Crow. (b) An Asiatic bird of the genus Gracula. See Myna.
Sericulus melinus
Bower bird Bow"er bird` (Zo["o]l.) An Australian bird (Ptilonorhynchus violaceus or holosericeus), allied to the starling, which constructs singular bowers or playhouses of twigs and decorates them with bright-colored objects; the satin bird. Note: The name is also applied to other related birds of the same region, having similar habits; as, the spotted bower bird (Chalmydodera maculata), and the regent bird (Sericulus melinus).
Trachynotus Carolinus
Crevalle Cre`val*le" (kr?`v?l-l?"), n. [Prob. of same origin as cavally. See Cavally.] (Zo["o]l.) (a) The cavally or jurel. See Cavally, and Jurel. (b) The pompano (Trachynotus Carolinus).
Turdus mustelinus
Wood Wood, n. [OE. wode, wude, AS. wudu, wiodu; akin to OHG. witu, Icel. vi?r, Dan. & Sw. ved wood, and probably to Ir. & Gael. fiodh, W. gwydd trees, shrubs.] 1. A large and thick collection of trees; a forest or grove; -- frequently used in the plural. Light thickens, and the crow Makes wing to the rooky wood. --Shak. 2. The substance of trees and the like; the hard fibrous substance which composes the body of a tree and its branches, and which is covered by the bark; timber. ``To worship their own work in wood and stone for gods.' --Milton. 3. (Bot.) The fibrous material which makes up the greater part of the stems and branches of trees and shrubby plants, and is found to a less extent in herbaceous stems. It consists of elongated tubular or needle-shaped cells of various kinds, usually interwoven with the shinning bands called silver grain. Note: Wood consists chiefly of the carbohydrates cellulose and lignin, which are isomeric with starch. 4. Trees cut or sawed for the fire or other uses. Wood acid, Wood vinegar (Chem.), a complex acid liquid obtained in the dry distillation of wood, and containing large quantities of acetic acid; hence, specifically, acetic acid. Formerly called pyroligneous acid. Wood anemone (Bot.), a delicate flower (Anemone nemorosa) of early spring; -- also called windflower. See Illust. of Anemone. Wood ant (Zo["o]l.), a large ant (Formica rufa) which lives in woods and forests, and constructs large nests. Wood apple (Bot.). See Elephant apple, under Elephant. Wood baboon (Zo["o]l.), the drill. Wood betony. (Bot.) (a) Same as Betony. (b) The common American lousewort (Pedicularis Canadensis), a low perennial herb with yellowish or purplish flowers. Wood borer. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The larva of any one of numerous species of boring beetles, esp. elaters, longicorn beetles, buprestidans, and certain weevils. See Apple borer, under Apple, and Pine weevil, under Pine. (b) The larva of any one of various species of lepidopterous insects, especially of the clearwing moths, as the peach-tree borer (see under Peach), and of the goat moths. (c) The larva of various species of hymenopterous of the tribe Urocerata. See Tremex. (d) Any one of several bivalve shells which bore in wood, as the teredos, and species of Xylophaga. (e) Any one of several species of small Crustacea, as the Limnoria, and the boring amphipod (Chelura terebrans). Wood carpet, a kind of floor covering made of thin pieces of wood secured to a flexible backing, as of cloth. --Knight. Wood cell (Bot.), a slender cylindrical or prismatic cell usually tapering to a point at both ends. It is the principal constituent of woody fiber. Wood choir, the choir, or chorus, of birds in the woods. [Poetic] --Coleridge. Wood coal, charcoal; also, lignite, or brown coal. Wood cricket (Zo["o]l.), a small European cricket (Nemobius sylvestris). Wood culver (Zo["o]l.), the wood pigeon. Wood cut, an engraving on wood; also, a print from such an engraving. Wood dove (Zo["o]l.), the stockdove. Wood drink, a decoction or infusion of medicinal woods. Wood duck (Zo["o]l.) (a) A very beautiful American duck (Aix sponsa). The male has a large crest, and its plumage is varied with green, purple, black, white, and red. It builds its nest in trees, whence the name. Called also bridal duck, summer duck, and wood widgeon. (b) The hooded merganser. (c) The Australian maned goose (Chlamydochen jubata). Wood echo, an echo from the wood. Wood engraver. (a) An engraver on wood. (b) (Zo["o]l.) Any of several species of small beetles whose larv[ae] bore beneath the bark of trees, and excavate furrows in the wood often more or less resembling coarse engravings; especially, Xyleborus xylographus. Wood engraving. (a) The act or art engraving on wood; xylography. (b) An engraving on wood; a wood cut; also, a print from such an engraving. Wood fern. (Bot.) See Shield fern, under Shield. Wood fiber. (a) (Bot.) Fibrovascular tissue. (b) Wood comminuted, and reduced to a powdery or dusty mass. Wood fretter (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of beetles whose larv[ae] bore in the wood, or beneath the bark, of trees. Wood frog (Zo["o]l.), a common North American frog (Rana sylvatica) which lives chiefly in the woods, except during the breeding season. It is drab or yellowish brown, with a black stripe on each side of the head. Wood germander. (Bot.) See under Germander. Wood god, a fabled sylvan deity. Wood grass. (Bot.) See under Grass. Wood grouse. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The capercailzie. (b) The spruce partridge. See under Spruce. Wood guest (Zo["o]l.), the ringdove. [Prov. Eng.] Wood hen. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of several species of Old World short-winged rails of the genus Ocydromus, including the weka and allied species. (b) The American woodcock. Wood hoopoe (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of Old World arboreal birds belonging to Irrisor and allied genera. They are closely allied to the common hoopoe, but have a curved beak, and a longer tail. Wood ibis (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of large, long-legged, wading birds belonging to the genus Tantalus. The head and neck are naked or scantily covered with feathers. The American wood ibis (Tantalus loculator) is common in Florida. Wood lark (Zo["o]l.), a small European lark (Alauda arborea), which, like, the skylark, utters its notes while on the wing. So called from its habit of perching on trees. Wood laurel (Bot.), a European evergreen shrub (Daphne Laureola). Wood leopard (Zo["o]l.), a European spotted moth (Zeuzera [ae]sculi) allied to the goat moth. Its large fleshy larva bores in the wood of the apple, pear, and other fruit trees. Wood lily (Bot.), the lily of the valley. Wood lock (Naut.), a piece of wood close fitted and sheathed with copper, in the throating or score of the pintle, to keep the rudder from rising. Wood louse (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of terrestrial isopod Crustacea belonging to Oniscus, Armadillo, and related genera. See Sow bug, under Sow, and Pill bug, under Pill. (b) Any one of several species of small, wingless, pseudoneuropterous insects of the family Psocid[ae], which live in the crevices of walls and among old books and papers. Some of the species are called also book lice, and deathticks, or deathwatches. Wood mite (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous small mites of the family Oribatid[ae]. They are found chiefly in woods, on tree trunks and stones. Wood mote. (Eng. Law) (a) Formerly, the forest court. (b) The court of attachment. Wood nettle. (Bot.) See under Nettle. Wood nightshade (Bot.), woody nightshade. Wood nut (Bot.), the filbert. Wood nymph. (a) A nymph inhabiting the woods; a fabled goddess of the woods; a dryad. ``The wood nymphs, decked with daisies trim.' --Milton. (b) (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of handsomely colored moths belonging to the genus Eudryas. The larv[ae] are bright-colored, and some of the species, as Eudryas grata, and E. unio, feed on the leaves of the grapevine. (c) (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of handsomely colored South American humming birds belonging to the genus Thalurania. The males are bright blue, or green and blue. Wood offering, wood burnt on the altar. We cast the lots . . . for the wood offering. --Neh. x. 34. Wood oil (Bot.), a resinous oil obtained from several East Indian trees of the genus Dipterocarpus, having properties similar to those of copaiba, and sometimes substituted for it. It is also used for mixing paint. See Gurjun. Wood opal (Min.), a striped variety of coarse opal, having some resemblance to wood. Wood paper, paper made of wood pulp. See Wood pulp, below. Wood pewee (Zo["o]l.), a North American tyrant flycatcher (Contopus virens). It closely resembles the pewee, but is smaller. Wood pie (Zo["o]l.), any black and white woodpecker, especially the European great spotted woodpecker. Wood pigeon. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of Old World pigeons belonging to Palumbus and allied genera of the family Columbid[ae]. (b) The ringdove. Wood puceron (Zo["o]l.), a plant louse. Wood pulp (Technol.), vegetable fiber obtained from the poplar and other white woods, and so softened by digestion with a hot solution of alkali that it can be formed into sheet paper, etc. It is now produced on an immense scale. Wood quail (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of East Indian crested quails belonging to Rollulus and allied genera, as the red-crested wood quail (R. roulroul), the male of which is bright green, with a long crest of red hairlike feathers. Wood rabbit (Zo["o]l.), the cottontail. Wood rat (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of American wild rats of the genus Neotoma found in the Southern United States; -- called also bush rat. The Florida wood rat (Neotoma Floridana) is the best-known species. Wood reed grass (Bot.), a tall grass (Cinna arundinacea) growing in moist woods. Wood reeve, the steward or overseer of a wood. [Eng.] Wood rush (Bot.), any plant of the genus Luzula, differing from the true rushes of the genus Juncus chiefly in having very few seeds in each capsule. Wood sage (Bot.), a name given to several labiate plants of the genus Teucrium. See Germander. Wood screw, a metal screw formed with a sharp thread, and usually with a slotted head, for insertion in wood. Wood sheldrake (Zo["o]l.), the hooded merganser. Wood shock (Zo["o]l.), the fisher. See Fisher, 2. Wood shrike (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of Old World singing birds belonging to Grallina, Collyricincla, Prionops, and allied genera, common in India and Australia. They are allied to the true shrikes, but feed upon both insects and berries. Wood snipe. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The American woodcock. (b) An Asiatic snipe (Gallinago nemoricola). Wood soot, soot from burnt wood. Wood sore. (Zo["o]l.) See Cuckoo spit, under Cuckoo. Wood sorrel (Bot.), a plant of the genus Oxalis (Oxalis Acetosella), having an acid taste. See Illust. (a) of Shamrock. Wood spirit. (Chem.) See Methyl alcohol, under Methyl. Wood stamp, a carved or engraved block or stamp of wood, for impressing figures or colors on fabrics. Wood star (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small South American humming birds belonging to the genus Calothorax. The male has a brilliant gorget of blue, purple, and other colors. Wood sucker (Zo["o]l.), the yaffle. Wood swallow (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of Old World passerine birds belonging to the genus Artamus and allied genera of the family Artamid[ae]. They are common in the East Indies, Asia, and Australia. In form and habits they resemble swallows, but in structure they resemble shrikes. They are usually black above and white beneath. Wood tapper (Zo["o]l.), any woodpecker. Wood tar. See under Tar. Wood thrush, (Zo["o]l.) (a) An American thrush (Turdus mustelinus) noted for the sweetness of its song. See under Thrush. (b) The missel thrush. Wood tick. See in Vocabulary. Wood tin. (Min.). See Cassiterite. Wood titmouse (Zo["o]l.), the goldcgest. Wood tortoise (Zo["o]l.), the sculptured tortoise. See under Sculptured. Wood vine (Bot.), the white bryony. Wood vinegar. See Wood acid, above. Wood warbler. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of American warblers of the genus Dendroica. See Warbler. (b) A European warbler (Phylloscopus sibilatrix); -- called also green wren, wood wren, and yellow wren. Wood worm (Zo["o]l.), a larva that bores in wood; a wood borer. Wood wren. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The wood warbler. (b) The willow warbler.

Meaning of Linus from wikipedia

- Linus may refer to: Pope Linus (died c. 76), the second Pope of the Catholic Church Linus Arnesson (born 1994), Swedish ice hockey player Linus Bylund...
- Linus Gabriel Sebastian (born August 20, 1986) is a Canadian YouTube personality, presenter, producer, and founder of Linus Media Group. He is best known...
- Curlie Lawsuits involving Torvalds at Curlie Linus's blog at blogspot.com Linus Torvalds on Google+ Linus Torvalds and His Five Entrepreneurial Lessons...
- have held the position of pope, Peter, Linus and Clement are specifically mentioned in the New Testament. Linus is mentioned in the closing greeting of...
- Isabelle "Belle" Darling (1881–1926). He was named "Linus Carl", in honor of Lucy's father, Linus, and Herman's father, Carl. In 1902, after his sister...
- Linus van Pelt is a character in Charles M. Schulz's comic strip Peanuts. The best friend of Charlie Brown, Linus is also the younger brother of Lucy...
- "Linus and Lucy" is a po****r jazz piano composition written by Vince Guaraldi, appearing in many of the Peanuts animated television specials. Named for...
- Linus William Roache (born 1 February 1964) is an English actor. He is known for playing Executive ADA Michael Cutter in the NBC dramas Law & Order (2008–10)...
- mythology Linus (Gr****: Λῖνος Linos "flax") was a reputed musician and master of eloquent speech. He was regarded as the first leader of lyric song. Linus' parentage...
- Gr**** mythology, Linus (Gr****: Λῖνος Linos "flax") may refer to the following personages: Male Linus, son of impious Lycaon. Linus, the great musician...
Loading...