Definition of Cardi. Meaning of Cardi. Synonyms of Cardi

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Definition of Cardi

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Anacardiaceous
Anacardiaceous An`a*car"di*a"ceous, a. (Bot.) Belonging to, or resembling, a family, or order, of plants of which the cashew tree is the type, and the species of sumac are well known examples.
Anacardic
Anacardic An`a*car"dic, a. Pertaining to, or derived from, the cashew nut; as, anacardic acid.
Anacardium
Anacardium An`a*car"di*um, n. [NL., fr. Gr. ? similar to + ? heart; -- the fruit of this plant being thought to resemble the heart of a bird.] (Bot.) A genus of plants including the cashew tree. See Cashew.
Anacardium occidentale
Cashew Ca*shew" (k[.a]*sh[=oo]"), n. [F. acajou, for cajou, prob. from Malay k[=a]yu tree; cf. Pg. acaju, cf. Acajou.] (Bot.) A tree (Anacardium occidentale) of the same family which the sumac. It is native in tropical America, but is now naturalized in all tropical countries. Its fruit, a kidney-shaped nut, grows at the extremity of an edible, pear-shaped hypocarp, about three inches long. Cashew nut, the large, kidney-shaped fruit of the cashew, which is edible after the caustic oil has been expelled from the shell by roasting the nut.
Cardia
Cardia Car"di*a, n. [NL., fr. Gr. ? heart, or upper orifice of the stomach.] (Anat.) (a) The heart. (b) The anterior or cardiac orifice of the stomach, where the esophagus enters it.
Cardiac
Cardiac Car"di*ac, a. [L. cardiacus, Gr. ?, fr. ? heart: cf. F. cardiaque.] 1. (Anat.) Pertaining to, resembling, or hear the heart; as, the cardiac arteries; the cardiac, or left, end of the stomach. 2. (Med.) Exciting action in the heart, through the medium of the stomach; cordial; stimulant. Cardiac passion (Med.) cardialgia; heartburn. [Archaic] Cardiac wheel. (Mach.) See Heart wheel.
Cardiac
Cardiac Car"di*ac n. (Med.) A medicine which excites action in the stomach; a cardial.
Cardiac passion
Cardiac Car"di*ac, a. [L. cardiacus, Gr. ?, fr. ? heart: cf. F. cardiaque.] 1. (Anat.) Pertaining to, resembling, or hear the heart; as, the cardiac arteries; the cardiac, or left, end of the stomach. 2. (Med.) Exciting action in the heart, through the medium of the stomach; cordial; stimulant. Cardiac passion (Med.) cardialgia; heartburn. [Archaic] Cardiac wheel. (Mach.) See Heart wheel.
Cardiac wheel
Cardiac Car"di*ac, a. [L. cardiacus, Gr. ?, fr. ? heart: cf. F. cardiaque.] 1. (Anat.) Pertaining to, resembling, or hear the heart; as, the cardiac arteries; the cardiac, or left, end of the stomach. 2. (Med.) Exciting action in the heart, through the medium of the stomach; cordial; stimulant. Cardiac passion (Med.) cardialgia; heartburn. [Archaic] Cardiac wheel. (Mach.) See Heart wheel.
Cardiacal
Cardiacal Car*di"a*cal, a. Cardiac.
Cardiacle
Cardiacle Car"di*a*cle, n. A pain about the heart. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
Cardiagraph
Cardiagraph Car"di*a*graph, n. See Cardiograph.
Cardialgla
Cardialgla Car`di*al"gl*a, Cardialgy Car"di*al`gy, n. [NL. cardialgia, fr. Gr. ?; ? heart + ? pain: cf. F. cardialgie.] (Med.) A burning or gnawing pain, or feeling of distress, referred to the region of the heart, accompanied with cardiac palpitation; heartburn. It is usually a symptom of indigestion.
Cardialgy
Cardialgla Car`di*al"gl*a, Cardialgy Car"di*al`gy, n. [NL. cardialgia, fr. Gr. ?; ? heart + ? pain: cf. F. cardialgie.] (Med.) A burning or gnawing pain, or feeling of distress, referred to the region of the heart, accompanied with cardiac palpitation; heartburn. It is usually a symptom of indigestion.
Cardigan jacket
Cardigan jacket Car"di*gan jack`et [From the Earl of Cardigan, who was famous in the Crimean campaign of 1854-55.] A warm jacket of knit worsted with or without sleeves.
Cardinal
Cardinal Car"di*nal, a. [L. cardinalis, fr. cardo the hinge of a door, that on which a thing turns or depends: cf. F. cardinal.] Of fundamental importance; pre["e]minent; superior; chief; principal. The cardinal intersections of the zodiac. --Sir T. Browne. Impudence is now a cardinal virtue. --Drayton. But cardinal sins, and hollow hearts, I fear ye. --Shak. Cardinal numbers, the numbers one, two, three, etc., in distinction from first, second, third, etc., which are called ordinal numbers. Cardinal points (a) (Geol.) The four principal points of the compass, or intersections of the horizon with the meridian and the prime vertical circle, north, south east, and west. (b) (Astrol.) The rising and setting of the sun, the zenith and nadir. Cardinal signs (Astron.) Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn. Cardinal teeth (Zo["o]l.), the central teeth of bivalve shell. See Bivalve. Cardinal veins (Anat.), the veins in vertebrate embryos, which run each side of the vertebral column and returm the blood to the heart. They remain through life in some fishes. Cardinal virtues, pre["e]minent virtues; among the ancients, prudence, justice, temperance, and fortitude. Cardinal winds, winds which blow from the cardinal points due north, south, east, or west.
Cardinal number
Number Num"ber, n. [OE. nombre, F. nombre, L. numerus; akin to Gr. ? that which is dealt out, fr. ? to deal out, distribute. See Numb, Nomad, and cf. Numerate, Numero, Numerous.] 1. That which admits of being counted or reckoned; a unit, or an aggregate of units; a numerable aggregate or collection of individuals; an assemblage made up of distinct things expressible by figures. 2. A collection of many individuals; a numerous assemblage; a multitude; many. Ladies are always of great use to the party they espouse, and never fail to win over numbers. --Addison. 3. A numeral; a word or character denoting a number; as, to put a number on a door. 4. Numerousness; multitude. Number itself importeth not much in armies where the people are of weak courage. --Bacon. 5. The state or quality of being numerable or countable. Of whom came nations, tribes, people, and kindreds out of number. --2 Esdras iii. 7. 6. Quantity, regarded as made up of an aggregate of separate things. 7. That which is regulated by count; poetic measure, as divisions of time or number of syllables; hence, poetry, verse; -- chiefly used in the plural. I lisped in numbers, for the numbers came. --Pope. 8. (Gram.) The distinction of objects, as one, or more than one (in some languages, as one, or two, or more than two), expressed (usually) by a difference in the form of a word; thus, the singular number and the plural number are the names of the forms of a word indicating the objects denoted or referred to by the word as one, or as more than one. 9. (Math.) The measure of the relation between quantities or things of the same kind; that abstract species of quantity which is capable of being expressed by figures; numerical value. Abstract number, Abundant number, Cardinal number, etc. See under Abstract, Abundant, etc. In numbers, in numbered parts; as, a book published in numbers.
Cardinal numbers
Cardinal Car"di*nal, a. [L. cardinalis, fr. cardo the hinge of a door, that on which a thing turns or depends: cf. F. cardinal.] Of fundamental importance; pre["e]minent; superior; chief; principal. The cardinal intersections of the zodiac. --Sir T. Browne. Impudence is now a cardinal virtue. --Drayton. But cardinal sins, and hollow hearts, I fear ye. --Shak. Cardinal numbers, the numbers one, two, three, etc., in distinction from first, second, third, etc., which are called ordinal numbers. Cardinal points (a) (Geol.) The four principal points of the compass, or intersections of the horizon with the meridian and the prime vertical circle, north, south east, and west. (b) (Astrol.) The rising and setting of the sun, the zenith and nadir. Cardinal signs (Astron.) Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn. Cardinal teeth (Zo["o]l.), the central teeth of bivalve shell. See Bivalve. Cardinal veins (Anat.), the veins in vertebrate embryos, which run each side of the vertebral column and returm the blood to the heart. They remain through life in some fishes. Cardinal virtues, pre["e]minent virtues; among the ancients, prudence, justice, temperance, and fortitude. Cardinal winds, winds which blow from the cardinal points due north, south, east, or west.
Cardinal points
Cardinal Car"di*nal, a. [L. cardinalis, fr. cardo the hinge of a door, that on which a thing turns or depends: cf. F. cardinal.] Of fundamental importance; pre["e]minent; superior; chief; principal. The cardinal intersections of the zodiac. --Sir T. Browne. Impudence is now a cardinal virtue. --Drayton. But cardinal sins, and hollow hearts, I fear ye. --Shak. Cardinal numbers, the numbers one, two, three, etc., in distinction from first, second, third, etc., which are called ordinal numbers. Cardinal points (a) (Geol.) The four principal points of the compass, or intersections of the horizon with the meridian and the prime vertical circle, north, south east, and west. (b) (Astrol.) The rising and setting of the sun, the zenith and nadir. Cardinal signs (Astron.) Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn. Cardinal teeth (Zo["o]l.), the central teeth of bivalve shell. See Bivalve. Cardinal veins (Anat.), the veins in vertebrate embryos, which run each side of the vertebral column and returm the blood to the heart. They remain through life in some fishes. Cardinal virtues, pre["e]minent virtues; among the ancients, prudence, justice, temperance, and fortitude. Cardinal winds, winds which blow from the cardinal points due north, south, east, or west.
Cardinal signs
Cardinal Car"di*nal, a. [L. cardinalis, fr. cardo the hinge of a door, that on which a thing turns or depends: cf. F. cardinal.] Of fundamental importance; pre["e]minent; superior; chief; principal. The cardinal intersections of the zodiac. --Sir T. Browne. Impudence is now a cardinal virtue. --Drayton. But cardinal sins, and hollow hearts, I fear ye. --Shak. Cardinal numbers, the numbers one, two, three, etc., in distinction from first, second, third, etc., which are called ordinal numbers. Cardinal points (a) (Geol.) The four principal points of the compass, or intersections of the horizon with the meridian and the prime vertical circle, north, south east, and west. (b) (Astrol.) The rising and setting of the sun, the zenith and nadir. Cardinal signs (Astron.) Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn. Cardinal teeth (Zo["o]l.), the central teeth of bivalve shell. See Bivalve. Cardinal veins (Anat.), the veins in vertebrate embryos, which run each side of the vertebral column and returm the blood to the heart. They remain through life in some fishes. Cardinal virtues, pre["e]minent virtues; among the ancients, prudence, justice, temperance, and fortitude. Cardinal winds, winds which blow from the cardinal points due north, south, east, or west.
Cardinal teeth
Cardinal Car"di*nal, a. [L. cardinalis, fr. cardo the hinge of a door, that on which a thing turns or depends: cf. F. cardinal.] Of fundamental importance; pre["e]minent; superior; chief; principal. The cardinal intersections of the zodiac. --Sir T. Browne. Impudence is now a cardinal virtue. --Drayton. But cardinal sins, and hollow hearts, I fear ye. --Shak. Cardinal numbers, the numbers one, two, three, etc., in distinction from first, second, third, etc., which are called ordinal numbers. Cardinal points (a) (Geol.) The four principal points of the compass, or intersections of the horizon with the meridian and the prime vertical circle, north, south east, and west. (b) (Astrol.) The rising and setting of the sun, the zenith and nadir. Cardinal signs (Astron.) Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn. Cardinal teeth (Zo["o]l.), the central teeth of bivalve shell. See Bivalve. Cardinal veins (Anat.), the veins in vertebrate embryos, which run each side of the vertebral column and returm the blood to the heart. They remain through life in some fishes. Cardinal virtues, pre["e]minent virtues; among the ancients, prudence, justice, temperance, and fortitude. Cardinal winds, winds which blow from the cardinal points due north, south, east, or west.
Cardinal veins
Cardinal Car"di*nal, a. [L. cardinalis, fr. cardo the hinge of a door, that on which a thing turns or depends: cf. F. cardinal.] Of fundamental importance; pre["e]minent; superior; chief; principal. The cardinal intersections of the zodiac. --Sir T. Browne. Impudence is now a cardinal virtue. --Drayton. But cardinal sins, and hollow hearts, I fear ye. --Shak. Cardinal numbers, the numbers one, two, three, etc., in distinction from first, second, third, etc., which are called ordinal numbers. Cardinal points (a) (Geol.) The four principal points of the compass, or intersections of the horizon with the meridian and the prime vertical circle, north, south east, and west. (b) (Astrol.) The rising and setting of the sun, the zenith and nadir. Cardinal signs (Astron.) Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn. Cardinal teeth (Zo["o]l.), the central teeth of bivalve shell. See Bivalve. Cardinal veins (Anat.), the veins in vertebrate embryos, which run each side of the vertebral column and returm the blood to the heart. They remain through life in some fishes. Cardinal virtues, pre["e]minent virtues; among the ancients, prudence, justice, temperance, and fortitude. Cardinal winds, winds which blow from the cardinal points due north, south, east, or west.
Cardinal virtues
Cardinal Car"di*nal, a. [L. cardinalis, fr. cardo the hinge of a door, that on which a thing turns or depends: cf. F. cardinal.] Of fundamental importance; pre["e]minent; superior; chief; principal. The cardinal intersections of the zodiac. --Sir T. Browne. Impudence is now a cardinal virtue. --Drayton. But cardinal sins, and hollow hearts, I fear ye. --Shak. Cardinal numbers, the numbers one, two, three, etc., in distinction from first, second, third, etc., which are called ordinal numbers. Cardinal points (a) (Geol.) The four principal points of the compass, or intersections of the horizon with the meridian and the prime vertical circle, north, south east, and west. (b) (Astrol.) The rising and setting of the sun, the zenith and nadir. Cardinal signs (Astron.) Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn. Cardinal teeth (Zo["o]l.), the central teeth of bivalve shell. See Bivalve. Cardinal veins (Anat.), the veins in vertebrate embryos, which run each side of the vertebral column and returm the blood to the heart. They remain through life in some fishes. Cardinal virtues, pre["e]minent virtues; among the ancients, prudence, justice, temperance, and fortitude. Cardinal winds, winds which blow from the cardinal points due north, south, east, or west.
Cardinal winds
Cardinal Car"di*nal, a. [L. cardinalis, fr. cardo the hinge of a door, that on which a thing turns or depends: cf. F. cardinal.] Of fundamental importance; pre["e]minent; superior; chief; principal. The cardinal intersections of the zodiac. --Sir T. Browne. Impudence is now a cardinal virtue. --Drayton. But cardinal sins, and hollow hearts, I fear ye. --Shak. Cardinal numbers, the numbers one, two, three, etc., in distinction from first, second, third, etc., which are called ordinal numbers. Cardinal points (a) (Geol.) The four principal points of the compass, or intersections of the horizon with the meridian and the prime vertical circle, north, south east, and west. (b) (Astrol.) The rising and setting of the sun, the zenith and nadir. Cardinal signs (Astron.) Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn. Cardinal teeth (Zo["o]l.), the central teeth of bivalve shell. See Bivalve. Cardinal veins (Anat.), the veins in vertebrate embryos, which run each side of the vertebral column and returm the blood to the heart. They remain through life in some fishes. Cardinal virtues, pre["e]minent virtues; among the ancients, prudence, justice, temperance, and fortitude. Cardinal winds, winds which blow from the cardinal points due north, south, east, or west.
Cardinalate
Cardinalate Car"di*nal*ate, n. [Cf. F. cardinalat, LL. cardinalatus.] The office, rank, or dignity of a cardinal.
Cardinalize
Cardinalize Car"di*nal*ize, v. t. To exalt to the office of a cardinal. --Sheldon.
Cardinalship
Cardinalship Car"di*nal*ship, n. The condition, dignity, of office of a cardinal
Cardines
Cardo Car"do (k[aum]r"d[-o]), n.; pl. Cardines.) [L., a hinge.] (Zo["o]l.) (a) The basal joint of the maxilla in insects. (b) The hinge of a bivalve shell.
Carding
Card Card, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Carded; p. pr. & vb. n. Carding.] To play at cards; to game. --Johnson.
Carding
Carding Card"ing, a. 1. The act or process of preparing staple for spinning, etc., by carding it. See the Note under Card, v. t. 2. A roll of wool or other fiber as it comes from the carding machine. Carding engine, Carding machine, a machine for carding cotton, wool, or other fiber, by subjecting it to the action of cylinders, or drum covered with wire-toothed cards, revoling nearly in contact with each other, at different rates of speed, or in opposite directions. The staple issues in soft sheets, or in slender rolls called sivers.

Meaning of Cardi from wikipedia

- Belcalis Marlenis Almánzar (born October 11, 1992), known professionally as Cardi B, is an American rapper, songwriter, and actress. Born in Manhattan and...
- (an acronym for "Wet-**** ****") is a song recorded by American rapper Cardi B, featuring vocals from American rapper Megan Thee Stallion. It was released...
- American rapper Cardi B has released one studio album, two solo mixtapes, 35 singles (including 20 as a featured artist) and 17 music videos (as a lead...
- Cardi is an Italian surname. Notable people with the surname include: Beatrice de Cardi (1914–2016), British archaeologist Lodovico Cardi (1559–1613)...
- "Bartier Cardi" is a song recorded by American rapper Cardi B featuring guest vocals from Atlanta-based rapper 21 Savage. It was released on December 22...
- with Cardi B, named Kulture Kiari Cephus, born July 10, 2018. Cardi B and Offset married privately on September 20, 2017. On December 5, 2018, Cardi B announced...
- "I Like It" is a song recorded by American rapper Cardi B with Puerto Rican rapper Bad Bunny and Colombian singer J Balvin for her debut studio album...
- "Money" is a song by American rapper Cardi B, released by Atlantic Records on October 23, 2018. The song was written by Cardi B with its producer J. White Did...
- Invasion of Privacy is the debut studio album by American rapper Cardi B. It was released on April 6, 2018, by Atlantic Records. Primarily a hip hop record...
- Cardi B. It was released on March 29, 2018, as the third single from her debut studio album Invasion of Privacy (2018). The song was written by Cardi...
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