Definition of Be . Meaning of Be . Synonyms of Be

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be or lie
Nutshell Nut"shell`, n. 1. The shell or hard external covering in which the kernel of a nut is inclosed. 2. Hence, a thing of little compass, or of little value. 3. (Zo["o]l.) A shell of the genus Nucula. To be, or lie, in a nutshell, to be within a small compass; to admit of very brief or simple determination or statement. ``The remedy lay in a nutshell.' --Macaulay.
Crambe maritima
Kale Kale, n. [Scot. kale, kail, cale, colewort, Gael. cael; akin to Ir. cal, W. cawl, Armor. kaol. See Cole.] 1. (Bot.) A variety of cabbage in which the leaves do not form a head, being nearly the original or wild form of the species. [Written also kail, and cale.] 2. See Kail, 2. Sea kale (Bot.), a European cruciferous herb (Crambe maritima), often used as a pot herb; sea cabbage.
Cube ore
Cube Cube (k?b), n. [F. cube, L. cubus, fr. Gr. ???? a cube, a cubical die.] 1. (Geom.) A regular solid body, with six equal square sides. 2. (Math.) The product obtained by taking a number or quantity three times as a factor; as, 4x4=16, and 16x4=64, the cube of 4. Cube ore (Min.), pharmacosiderite. It commonly crystallizes in cubes of a green color. Cube root. (Math.), the number or quantity which, multiplied into itself, and then into the product, produces the given cube; thus, 3 is the cube root of 27, for 3x3x3 = 27. Cube spar (Min.), anhydrite; anhydrous calcium sulphate.
Cube root
Cube Cube (k?b), n. [F. cube, L. cubus, fr. Gr. ???? a cube, a cubical die.] 1. (Geom.) A regular solid body, with six equal square sides. 2. (Math.) The product obtained by taking a number or quantity three times as a factor; as, 4x4=16, and 16x4=64, the cube of 4. Cube ore (Min.), pharmacosiderite. It commonly crystallizes in cubes of a green color. Cube root. (Math.), the number or quantity which, multiplied into itself, and then into the product, produces the given cube; thus, 3 is the cube root of 27, for 3x3x3 = 27. Cube spar (Min.), anhydrite; anhydrous calcium sulphate.
Cube spar
Spar Spar, n. [AS. sp[ae]r in sp[ae]rst[=a]n chalkstone; akin to MHG. spar, G. sparkalk plaster.] (Min.) An old name for a nonmetallic mineral, usually cleavable and somewhat lustrous; as, calc spar, or calcite, fluor spar, etc. It was especially used in the case of the gangue minerals of a metalliferous vein. Blue spar, Cube spar, etc. See under Blue, Cube, etc.
Cube spar
Cube Cube (k?b), n. [F. cube, L. cubus, fr. Gr. ???? a cube, a cubical die.] 1. (Geom.) A regular solid body, with six equal square sides. 2. (Math.) The product obtained by taking a number or quantity three times as a factor; as, 4x4=16, and 16x4=64, the cube of 4. Cube ore (Min.), pharmacosiderite. It commonly crystallizes in cubes of a green color. Cube root. (Math.), the number or quantity which, multiplied into itself, and then into the product, produces the given cube; thus, 3 is the cube root of 27, for 3x3x3 = 27. Cube spar (Min.), anhydrite; anhydrous calcium sulphate.
Globe amaranth
Globe Globe, n. [L. globus, perh. akin to L. glomus a ball of yarn, and E. clump, golf: cf. F. globe.] 1. A round or spherical body, solid or hollow; a body whose surface is in every part equidistant from the center; a ball; a sphere. 2. Anything which is nearly spherical or globular in shape; as, the globe of the eye; the globe of a lamp. 3. The earth; the terraqueous ball; -- usually preceded by the definite article. --Locke. 4. A round model of the world; a spherical representation of the earth or heavens; as, a terrestrial or celestial globe; -- called also artificial globe. 5. A body of troops, or of men or animals, drawn up in a circle; -- a military formation used by the Romans, answering to the modern infantry square. Him round A globe of fiery seraphim inclosed. --Milton. Globe amaranth (Bot.), a plant of the genus Gomphrena (G. globosa), bearing round heads of variously colored flowers, which long retain color when gathered. Globe animalcule, a small, globular, locomotive organism (Volvox globator), once throught to be an animal, afterward supposed to be a colony of microscopic alg[ae]. Globe of compression (Mil.), a kind of mine producing a wide crater; -- called also overcharged mine. Globe daisy (Bot.), a plant or flower of the genus Globularing, common in Europe. The flowers are minute and form globular heads. Globe sight, a form of front sight placed on target rifles. Globe slater (Zo["o]l.), an isopod crustacean of the genus Spheroma. Globe thistle (Bot.), a thistlelike plant with the flowers in large globular heads (Cynara Scolymus); also, certain species of the related genus Echinops. Globe valve. (a) A ball valve. (b) A valve inclosed in a globular chamber. --Knight.
Globe animalcule
Globe Globe, n. [L. globus, perh. akin to L. glomus a ball of yarn, and E. clump, golf: cf. F. globe.] 1. A round or spherical body, solid or hollow; a body whose surface is in every part equidistant from the center; a ball; a sphere. 2. Anything which is nearly spherical or globular in shape; as, the globe of the eye; the globe of a lamp. 3. The earth; the terraqueous ball; -- usually preceded by the definite article. --Locke. 4. A round model of the world; a spherical representation of the earth or heavens; as, a terrestrial or celestial globe; -- called also artificial globe. 5. A body of troops, or of men or animals, drawn up in a circle; -- a military formation used by the Romans, answering to the modern infantry square. Him round A globe of fiery seraphim inclosed. --Milton. Globe amaranth (Bot.), a plant of the genus Gomphrena (G. globosa), bearing round heads of variously colored flowers, which long retain color when gathered. Globe animalcule, a small, globular, locomotive organism (Volvox globator), once throught to be an animal, afterward supposed to be a colony of microscopic alg[ae]. Globe of compression (Mil.), a kind of mine producing a wide crater; -- called also overcharged mine. Globe daisy (Bot.), a plant or flower of the genus Globularing, common in Europe. The flowers are minute and form globular heads. Globe sight, a form of front sight placed on target rifles. Globe slater (Zo["o]l.), an isopod crustacean of the genus Spheroma. Globe thistle (Bot.), a thistlelike plant with the flowers in large globular heads (Cynara Scolymus); also, certain species of the related genus Echinops. Globe valve. (a) A ball valve. (b) A valve inclosed in a globular chamber. --Knight.
Globe daisy
Globe Globe, n. [L. globus, perh. akin to L. glomus a ball of yarn, and E. clump, golf: cf. F. globe.] 1. A round or spherical body, solid or hollow; a body whose surface is in every part equidistant from the center; a ball; a sphere. 2. Anything which is nearly spherical or globular in shape; as, the globe of the eye; the globe of a lamp. 3. The earth; the terraqueous ball; -- usually preceded by the definite article. --Locke. 4. A round model of the world; a spherical representation of the earth or heavens; as, a terrestrial or celestial globe; -- called also artificial globe. 5. A body of troops, or of men or animals, drawn up in a circle; -- a military formation used by the Romans, answering to the modern infantry square. Him round A globe of fiery seraphim inclosed. --Milton. Globe amaranth (Bot.), a plant of the genus Gomphrena (G. globosa), bearing round heads of variously colored flowers, which long retain color when gathered. Globe animalcule, a small, globular, locomotive organism (Volvox globator), once throught to be an animal, afterward supposed to be a colony of microscopic alg[ae]. Globe of compression (Mil.), a kind of mine producing a wide crater; -- called also overcharged mine. Globe daisy (Bot.), a plant or flower of the genus Globularing, common in Europe. The flowers are minute and form globular heads. Globe sight, a form of front sight placed on target rifles. Globe slater (Zo["o]l.), an isopod crustacean of the genus Spheroma. Globe thistle (Bot.), a thistlelike plant with the flowers in large globular heads (Cynara Scolymus); also, certain species of the related genus Echinops. Globe valve. (a) A ball valve. (b) A valve inclosed in a globular chamber. --Knight.
Globe of compression
Globe Globe, n. [L. globus, perh. akin to L. glomus a ball of yarn, and E. clump, golf: cf. F. globe.] 1. A round or spherical body, solid or hollow; a body whose surface is in every part equidistant from the center; a ball; a sphere. 2. Anything which is nearly spherical or globular in shape; as, the globe of the eye; the globe of a lamp. 3. The earth; the terraqueous ball; -- usually preceded by the definite article. --Locke. 4. A round model of the world; a spherical representation of the earth or heavens; as, a terrestrial or celestial globe; -- called also artificial globe. 5. A body of troops, or of men or animals, drawn up in a circle; -- a military formation used by the Romans, answering to the modern infantry square. Him round A globe of fiery seraphim inclosed. --Milton. Globe amaranth (Bot.), a plant of the genus Gomphrena (G. globosa), bearing round heads of variously colored flowers, which long retain color when gathered. Globe animalcule, a small, globular, locomotive organism (Volvox globator), once throught to be an animal, afterward supposed to be a colony of microscopic alg[ae]. Globe of compression (Mil.), a kind of mine producing a wide crater; -- called also overcharged mine. Globe daisy (Bot.), a plant or flower of the genus Globularing, common in Europe. The flowers are minute and form globular heads. Globe sight, a form of front sight placed on target rifles. Globe slater (Zo["o]l.), an isopod crustacean of the genus Spheroma. Globe thistle (Bot.), a thistlelike plant with the flowers in large globular heads (Cynara Scolymus); also, certain species of the related genus Echinops. Globe valve. (a) A ball valve. (b) A valve inclosed in a globular chamber. --Knight.
Globe sight
Globe Globe, n. [L. globus, perh. akin to L. glomus a ball of yarn, and E. clump, golf: cf. F. globe.] 1. A round or spherical body, solid or hollow; a body whose surface is in every part equidistant from the center; a ball; a sphere. 2. Anything which is nearly spherical or globular in shape; as, the globe of the eye; the globe of a lamp. 3. The earth; the terraqueous ball; -- usually preceded by the definite article. --Locke. 4. A round model of the world; a spherical representation of the earth or heavens; as, a terrestrial or celestial globe; -- called also artificial globe. 5. A body of troops, or of men or animals, drawn up in a circle; -- a military formation used by the Romans, answering to the modern infantry square. Him round A globe of fiery seraphim inclosed. --Milton. Globe amaranth (Bot.), a plant of the genus Gomphrena (G. globosa), bearing round heads of variously colored flowers, which long retain color when gathered. Globe animalcule, a small, globular, locomotive organism (Volvox globator), once throught to be an animal, afterward supposed to be a colony of microscopic alg[ae]. Globe of compression (Mil.), a kind of mine producing a wide crater; -- called also overcharged mine. Globe daisy (Bot.), a plant or flower of the genus Globularing, common in Europe. The flowers are minute and form globular heads. Globe sight, a form of front sight placed on target rifles. Globe slater (Zo["o]l.), an isopod crustacean of the genus Spheroma. Globe thistle (Bot.), a thistlelike plant with the flowers in large globular heads (Cynara Scolymus); also, certain species of the related genus Echinops. Globe valve. (a) A ball valve. (b) A valve inclosed in a globular chamber. --Knight.
Globe slater
Globe Globe, n. [L. globus, perh. akin to L. glomus a ball of yarn, and E. clump, golf: cf. F. globe.] 1. A round or spherical body, solid or hollow; a body whose surface is in every part equidistant from the center; a ball; a sphere. 2. Anything which is nearly spherical or globular in shape; as, the globe of the eye; the globe of a lamp. 3. The earth; the terraqueous ball; -- usually preceded by the definite article. --Locke. 4. A round model of the world; a spherical representation of the earth or heavens; as, a terrestrial or celestial globe; -- called also artificial globe. 5. A body of troops, or of men or animals, drawn up in a circle; -- a military formation used by the Romans, answering to the modern infantry square. Him round A globe of fiery seraphim inclosed. --Milton. Globe amaranth (Bot.), a plant of the genus Gomphrena (G. globosa), bearing round heads of variously colored flowers, which long retain color when gathered. Globe animalcule, a small, globular, locomotive organism (Volvox globator), once throught to be an animal, afterward supposed to be a colony of microscopic alg[ae]. Globe of compression (Mil.), a kind of mine producing a wide crater; -- called also overcharged mine. Globe daisy (Bot.), a plant or flower of the genus Globularing, common in Europe. The flowers are minute and form globular heads. Globe sight, a form of front sight placed on target rifles. Globe slater (Zo["o]l.), an isopod crustacean of the genus Spheroma. Globe thistle (Bot.), a thistlelike plant with the flowers in large globular heads (Cynara Scolymus); also, certain species of the related genus Echinops. Globe valve. (a) A ball valve. (b) A valve inclosed in a globular chamber. --Knight.
Globe thistle
Globe Globe, n. [L. globus, perh. akin to L. glomus a ball of yarn, and E. clump, golf: cf. F. globe.] 1. A round or spherical body, solid or hollow; a body whose surface is in every part equidistant from the center; a ball; a sphere. 2. Anything which is nearly spherical or globular in shape; as, the globe of the eye; the globe of a lamp. 3. The earth; the terraqueous ball; -- usually preceded by the definite article. --Locke. 4. A round model of the world; a spherical representation of the earth or heavens; as, a terrestrial or celestial globe; -- called also artificial globe. 5. A body of troops, or of men or animals, drawn up in a circle; -- a military formation used by the Romans, answering to the modern infantry square. Him round A globe of fiery seraphim inclosed. --Milton. Globe amaranth (Bot.), a plant of the genus Gomphrena (G. globosa), bearing round heads of variously colored flowers, which long retain color when gathered. Globe animalcule, a small, globular, locomotive organism (Volvox globator), once throught to be an animal, afterward supposed to be a colony of microscopic alg[ae]. Globe of compression (Mil.), a kind of mine producing a wide crater; -- called also overcharged mine. Globe daisy (Bot.), a plant or flower of the genus Globularing, common in Europe. The flowers are minute and form globular heads. Globe sight, a form of front sight placed on target rifles. Globe slater (Zo["o]l.), an isopod crustacean of the genus Spheroma. Globe thistle (Bot.), a thistlelike plant with the flowers in large globular heads (Cynara Scolymus); also, certain species of the related genus Echinops. Globe valve. (a) A ball valve. (b) A valve inclosed in a globular chamber. --Knight.
Globe valve
Globe Globe, n. [L. globus, perh. akin to L. glomus a ball of yarn, and E. clump, golf: cf. F. globe.] 1. A round or spherical body, solid or hollow; a body whose surface is in every part equidistant from the center; a ball; a sphere. 2. Anything which is nearly spherical or globular in shape; as, the globe of the eye; the globe of a lamp. 3. The earth; the terraqueous ball; -- usually preceded by the definite article. --Locke. 4. A round model of the world; a spherical representation of the earth or heavens; as, a terrestrial or celestial globe; -- called also artificial globe. 5. A body of troops, or of men or animals, drawn up in a circle; -- a military formation used by the Romans, answering to the modern infantry square. Him round A globe of fiery seraphim inclosed. --Milton. Globe amaranth (Bot.), a plant of the genus Gomphrena (G. globosa), bearing round heads of variously colored flowers, which long retain color when gathered. Globe animalcule, a small, globular, locomotive organism (Volvox globator), once throught to be an animal, afterward supposed to be a colony of microscopic alg[ae]. Globe of compression (Mil.), a kind of mine producing a wide crater; -- called also overcharged mine. Globe daisy (Bot.), a plant or flower of the genus Globularing, common in Europe. The flowers are minute and form globular heads. Globe sight, a form of front sight placed on target rifles. Globe slater (Zo["o]l.), an isopod crustacean of the genus Spheroma. Globe thistle (Bot.), a thistlelike plant with the flowers in large globular heads (Cynara Scolymus); also, certain species of the related genus Echinops. Globe valve. (a) A ball valve. (b) A valve inclosed in a globular chamber. --Knight.
Jujube paste
Jujube Ju"jube (j[=u]"j[-u]b), n. [F., fr. L. zizyphum, Gr. zi`zyfon, Per. z[=i]zf[=u]n, zizaf[=u]n, zayzaf[=u]n.] The sweet and edible drupes (fruits) of several Mediterranean and African species of small trees, of the genus Zizyphus, especially the Z. jujuba, Z. vulgaris, Z. mucronata, and Z. Lotus. The last named is thought to have furnished the lotus of the ancient Libyan Lotophagi, or lotus eaters. Jujube paste, the dried or inspissated jelly of the jujube; also, a confection made of gum arabic sweetened.
Let bygones be bygones
Bygone By"gone`, n. Something gone by or past; a past event. ``Let old bygones be' --Tennyson. Let bygones be bygones, let the past be forgotten.
Lobe of the ear
Lobe Lobe, n. [F. lobe, Gr. ?.] Any projection or division, especially one of a somewhat rounded form; as: (a) (Bot.) A rounded projection or division of a leaf. --Gray. (b) (Zo["o]l.) A membranous flap on the sides of the toes of certain birds, as the coot. (c) (Anat.) A round projecting part of an organ, as of the liver, lungs, brain, etc. See Illust. of Brain. (b) (Mach.) The projecting part of a cam wheel or of a non-circular gear wheel. Lobe of the ear, the soft, fleshy prominence in which the human ear terminates below. See. Illust. of Ear.
To be acknown
Acknow Ac*know", v. t. [Pref. a- + know; AS. oncn[=a]wan.] 1. To recognize. [Obs.] ``You will not be acknown, sir.' --B. Jonson. 2. To acknowledge; to confess. [Obs.] --Chaucer. To be acknown (often with of or on), to acknowledge; to confess. [Obs.] We say of a stubborn body that standeth still in the denying of his fault, This man will not acknowledge his fault, or, He will not be acknown of his fault. --Sir T. More.
To be after
After Aft"er, prep. 1. Behind in place; as, men in line one after another. ``Shut doors after you.' --Shak. 2. Below in rank; next to in order. --Shak. Codrus after Ph?bus sings the best. --Dryden. 3. Later in time; subsequent; as, after supper, after three days. It often precedes a clause. Formerly that was interposed between it and the clause. After I am risen again, I will go before you into Galilee. --Matt. xxvi. 32. 4. Subsequent to and in consequence of; as, after what you have said, I shall be careful. 5. Subsequent to and notwithstanding; as, after all our advice, you took that course. 6. Moving toward from behind; following, in search of; in pursuit of. Ye shall not go after other gods. --Deut. vi. 14. After whom is the king of Israel come out? --1 Sam. xxiv. 14. 7. Denoting the aim or object; concerning; in relation to; as, to look after workmen; to inquire after a friend; to thirst after righteousness. 8. In imitation of; in conformity with; after the manner of; as, to make a thing after a model; a picture after Rubens; the boy takes after his father. To name or call after, to name like and reference to. Our eldest son was named George after his uncle. --Goldsmith. 9. According to; in accordance with; in conformity with the nature of; as, he acted after his kind. He shall not judge after the sight of his eyes. --Isa. xi. 3. They that are after the flesh do mind the things of the flesh. --Rom. viii. 5. 10. According to the direction and influence of; in proportion to; befitting. [Archaic] He takes greatness of kingdoms according to bulk and currency, and not after their intrinsic value. --Bacon. After all, when everything has been considered; upon the whole. After (with the same noun preceding and following), as, wave after wave, day after day, several or many (waves, etc.) successively. One after another, successively. To be after, to be in pursuit of in order to reach or get; as, he is after money.
To be aknow
Aknow Ak*now" Earlier form of Acknow. [Obs.] To be aknow, to acknowledge; to confess. [Obs.]
To be astern of the reckoning
Astern A*stern", adv. [Pref. a- + stern.] (Naut.) 1. In or at the hinder part of a ship; toward the hinder part, or stern; backward; as, to go astern. 2. Behind a ship; in the rear. ``A gale of wind right astern.' --De Foe. ``Left this strait astern.' --Drake. To bake astern, to go stern foremost. To be astern of the reckoning, to be behind the position given by the reckoning. To drop astern, to fall or be left behind. To go astern, to go backward, as from the action of currents or winds.
To be at cross-purposes
Cross-purpose Cross"-pur`pose (-p?r`p?s), n. 1. A counter or opposing purpose; hence, that which is inconsistent or contradictory. --Shaftesbury. 2. pl. A conversational game, in which questions and answers are made so as to involve ludicrous combinations of ideas. --Pepys. To be at cross-purposes, to misunderstand or to act counter to one another without intending it; -- said of persons.
To be at six and seven
Six Six, n. 1. The number greater by a unit than five; the sum of three and three; six units or objects. 2. A symbol representing six units, as 6, vi., or VI. To be at six and seven or at sixes and sevens, to be in disorder. --Bacon. Shak. Swift.
To be at the boiling point
Boiling Boil"ing, a. Heated to the point of bubbling; heaving with bubbles; in tumultuous agitation, as boiling liquid; surging; seething; swelling with heat, ardor, or passion. Boiling point, the temperature at which a fluid is converted into vapor, with the phenomena of ebullition. This is different for different liquids, and for the same liquid under different pressures. For water, at the level of the sea, barometer 30 in., it is 212 [deg] Fahrenheit; for alcohol, 172.96[deg]; for ether, 94.8[deg]; for mercury, about 675[deg]. The boiling point of water is lowered one degree Fahrenheit for about 550 feet of ascent above the level of the sea. Boiling spring, a spring which gives out very hot water, or water and steam, often ejecting it with much force; a geyser. To be at the boiling point, to be very angry. To keep the pot boiling, to keep going on actively, as in certain games. [Colloq.]
To be at the mercy of
Mercy Mer"cy, n.; pl. Mercies. [OE. merci, F. merci, L. merces, mercedis, hire, pay, reward, LL., equiv. to misericordia pity, mercy. L. merces is prob? akin to merere to deserve, acquire. See Merit, and cf. Amerce.] 1. Forbearance to inflict harm under circumstances of provocation, when one has the power to inflict it; compassionate treatment of an offender or adversary; clemency. Examples of justice must be made for terror to some; examples of mercy for comfort to others. --Bacon. 2. Compassionate treatment of the unfortunate and helpless; sometimes, favor, beneficence. --Luke x. 37. 3. Disposition to exercise compassion or favor; pity; compassion; willingness to spare or to help. In whom mercy lacketh and is not founden. --Sir T. Elyot. 4. A blessing regarded as a manifestation of compassion or favor. The Father of mercies and the God of all comfort. --2 Cor. i. 3. Mercy seat (Bib.), the golden cover or lid of the Ark of the Covenant. See Ark, 2. Sisters of Mercy (R. C. Ch.),a religious order founded in Dublin in the year 1827. Communities of the same name have since been established in various American cities. The duties of those belonging to the order are, to attend lying-in hospitals, to superintend the education of girls, and protect decent women out of employment, to visit prisoners and the sick, and to attend persons condemned to death. To be at the mercy of, to be wholly in the power of. Syn: See Grace.
To be badly off
To be well off, to be in good condition. To be ill off, To be badly off, to be in poor condition.
To be blessed with
Bless me! Bless us! an exclamation of surprise. --Milton. To bless from, to secure, defend, or preserve from. ``Bless me from marrying a usurer.' --Shak. To bless the doors from nightly harm. --Milton. To bless with, To be blessed with, to favor or endow with; to be favored or endowed with; as, God blesses us with health; we are blessed with happiness.
To be born in the purple
Purple Pur"ple, n.; pl. Purples. [OE. purpre, pourpre, OF. purpre, porpre, pourpre, F. pourpre, L. purpura purple fish, purple dye, fr. Gr. ? the purple fish, a shell from the purple dye was obtained, purple dye; cf. ? dark (said of the sea), purple, ? to grow dark (said of the sea), to be troubled; perh. akin to L. furere to rage, E. fury: cf. AS. purpure. Cf. Porphyry, Purpure.] 1. A color formed by, or resembling that formed by, a combination of the primary colors red and blue. Arraying with reflected purple and gold The clouds that on his western throne attend. -- Milton. Note: The ancient words which are translated purple are supposed to have been used for the color we call crimson. In the gradations of color as defined in art, purple is a mixture of red and blue. When red predominates it is called violet, and when blue predominates, hyacinth. 2. Cloth dyed a purple color, or a garment of such color; especially, a purple robe, worn as an emblem of rank or authority; specifically, the purple rode or mantle worn by Roman emperors as the emblem of imperial dignity; as, to put on the imperial purple. Thou shalt make the tabernacle with ten curtains of fine twined linen, and purple, and scarlet. --Ex. xxvi. 1. 3. Hence: Imperial sovereignty; royal rank, dignity, or favor; loosely and colloquially, any exalted station; great wealth. ``He was born in the purple.' --Gibbon. 4. A cardinalate. See Cardinal. 5. (Zo["o]l.) Any species of large butterflies, usually marked with purple or blue, of the genus Basilarchia (formerly Limenitis) as, the banded purple (B. arthemis). See Illust. under Ursula. 6. (Zo["o]l.) Any shell of the genus Purpura. 7. pl.(Med.) See Purpura. 8. pl. A disease of wheat. Same as Earcockle. Note: Purple is sometimes used in composition, esp. with participles forming words of obvious signification; as, purple-colored, purple-hued, purple-stained, purple-tinged, purple-tinted, and the like. French purple. (Chem.) Same as Cudbear. Purple of Cassius. See Cassius. Purple of mollusca (Zo["o]l.), a coloring matter derived from certain mollusks, which dyes wool, etc., of a purple or crimson color, and is supposed to be the substance of the famous Tyrian dye. It is obtained from Ianthina, and from several species of Purpura, and Murex. To be born in the purple, to be of princely birth; to be highborn.
To be brought to bed
Bed Bed, n. [AS. bed, bedd; akin to OS. bed, D. bed, bedde, Icel. be?r, Dan. bed, Sw. b["a]dd, Goth. badi, OHG. betti, G. bett, bette, bed, beet a plat of ground; all of uncertain origin.] 1. An article of furniture to sleep or take rest in or on; a couch. Specifically: A sack or mattress, filled with some soft material, in distinction from the bedstead on which it is placed (as, a feather bed), or this with the bedclothes added. In a general sense, any thing or place used for sleeping or reclining on or in, as a quantity of hay, straw, leaves, or twigs. And made for him [a horse] a leafy bed. --Byron. I wash, wring, brew, bake, . . . make the beds. --Shak. In bed he slept not for my urging it. --Shak. 2. (Used as the symbol of matrimony) Marriage. George, the eldest son of his second bed. --Clarendon. 3. A plat or level piece of ground in a garden, usually a little raised above the adjoining ground. ``Beds of hyacinth and roses.' --Milton. 4. A mass or heap of anything arranged like a bed; as, a bed of ashes or coals. 5. The bottom of a watercourse, or of any body of water; as, the bed of a river. So sinks the daystar in the ocean bed. --Milton. 6. (Geol.) A layer or seam, or a horizontal stratum between layers; as, a bed of coal, iron, etc. 7. (Gun.) See Gun carriage, and Mortar bed. 8. (Masonry) (a) The horizontal surface of a building stone; as, the upper and lower beds. (b) A course of stone or brick in a wall. (c) The place or material in which a block or brick is laid. (d) The lower surface of a brick, slate, or tile. --Knight. 9. (Mech.) The foundation or the more solid and fixed part or framing of a machine; or a part on which something is laid or supported; as, the bed of an engine. 10. The superficial earthwork, or ballast, of a railroad. 11. (Printing) The flat part of the press, on which the form is laid. Note: Bed is much used adjectively or in combination; as, bed key or bedkey; bed wrench or bedwrench; bedchamber; bedmaker, etc. Bed of justice (French Hist.), the throne (F. lit bed) occupied by the king when sitting in one of his parliaments (judicial courts); hence, a session of a refractory parliament, at which the king was present for the purpose of causing his decrees to be registered. To be brought to bed, to be delivered of a child; -- often followed by of; as, to be brought to bed of a son. To make a bed, to prepare a bed; to arrange or put in order a bed and its bedding. From bed and board (Law), a phrase applied to a separation by partial divorce of man and wife, without dissolving the bonds of matrimony. If such a divorce (now commonly called a judicial separation) be granted at the instance of the wife, she may have alimony.
To be down on
Down Down, adv. [For older adown, AS. ad?n, ad?ne, prop., from or off the hill. See 3d Down, and cf. Adown, and cf. Adown.] 1. In the direction of gravity or toward the center of the earth; toward or in a lower place or position; below; -- the opposite of up. 2. Hence, in many derived uses, as: (a) From a higher to a lower position, literally or figuratively; in a descending direction; from the top of an ascent; from an upright position; to the ground or floor; to or into a lower or an inferior condition; as, into a state of humility, disgrace, misery, and the like; into a state of rest; -- used with verbs indicating motion. It will be rain to-night. Let it come down. --Shak. I sit me down beside the hazel grove. --Tennyson. And that drags down his life. --Tennyson. There is not a more melancholy object in the learned world than a man who has written himself down. --Addison. The French . . . shone down [i. e., outshone] the English. --Shak. (b) In a low or the lowest position, literally or figuratively; at the bottom of a decent; below the horizon; of the ground; in a condition of humility, dejection, misery, and the like; in a state of quiet. I was down and out of breath. --Shak. The moon is down; I have not heard the clock. --Shak. He that is down needs fear no fall. --Bunyan. 3. From a remoter or higher antiquity. Venerable men! you have come down to us from a former generation. --D. Webster. 4. From a greater to a less bulk, or from a thinner to a thicker consistence; as, to boil down in cookery, or in making decoctions. --Arbuthnot. Note: Down is sometimes used elliptically, standing for go down, come down, tear down, take down, put down, haul down, pay down, and the like, especially in command or exclamation. Down, therefore, and beg mercy of the duke. --Shak. If he be hungry more than wanton, bread alone will down. --Locke. Down is also used intensively; as, to be loaded down; to fall down; to hang down; to drop down; to pay down. The temple of Her[`e] at Argos was burnt down. --Jowett (Thucyd. ). Down, as well as up, is sometimes used in a conventional sense; as, down East. Persons in London say down to Scotland, etc., and those in the provinces, up to London. --Stormonth. Down helm (Naut.), an order to the helmsman to put the helm to leeward. Down on or upon (joined with a verb indicating motion, as go, come, pounce), to attack, implying the idea of threatening power. Come down upon us with a mighty power. --Shak. Down with, take down, throw down, put down; -- used in energetic command. ``Down with the palace; fire it.' --Dryden. To be down on, to dislike and treat harshly. [Slang, U.S.] To cry down. See under Cry, v. t. To cut down. See under Cut, v. t. Up and down, with rising and falling motion; to and fro; hither and thither; everywhere. ``Let them wander up and down.' --Ps. lix. 15.

Meaning of Be from wikipedia

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