Definition of Ville. Meaning of Ville. Synonyms of Ville

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Ville. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Ville and, of course, Ville synonyms and on the right images related to the word Ville.

Definition of Ville

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Bedevilled
Bedevil Be*dev"il, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Bedevilled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Bedeviling or Bedevilling.] 1. To throw into utter disorder and confusion, as if by the agency of evil spirits; to bring under diabolical influence; to torment. Bedeviled and used worse than St. Bartholomew. --Sterne. 2. To spoil; to corrupt. --Wright.
Cavilled
Cavil Cav"il (k[a^]v"[i^]l), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Caviled or Cavilled; p. pr. & vb. n. Caviling or Cavilling.] [L. cavillari to practice jesting, to censure, fr. cavilla bantering jests, sophistry: cf. OF. caviller.] To raise captious and frivolous objections; to find fault without good reason. You do not well in obstinacy To cavil in the course of this contract. --Shak.
Caviller
Caviler Cav"il*er or Caviller Cav"il*ler (-[~e]r), n. One who cavils. Cavilers at the style of the Scriptures. --Boyle.
Covillea mexicana
Creosote bush Cre"o*sote bush A shrub (Covillea mexicana) found in desert regions from Colorado to California and southward through Mexico. It has yellow flowers and very resinous foliage with a strong odor of creosote.
Devilled
Devil Dev"il, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Deviledor Devilled; p. pr. & vb. n. Devilingor Devilling.] 1. To make like a devil; to invest with the character of a devil. 2. To grill with Cayenne pepper; to season highly in cooking, as with pepper. A deviled leg of turkey. --W. Irving.
Grevillea robusta
Silky Silk"y, a. [Compar. Silkier; superl. Silkiest.] 1. Of or pertaining to silk; made of, or resembling, silk; silken; silklike; as, a silky luster. 2. Hence, soft and smooth; as, silky wine. 3. Covered with soft hairs pressed close to the surface, as a leaf; sericeous. Silky oak (Bot.), a lofty Australian tree (Grevillea robusta) with silky tomentose lobed or incised leaves. It furnishes a valuable timber.
Hotel-de-ville
Hotel-de-ville H[^o]tel`-de-ville", n. [F.] A city hall or townhouse.
pulville
Pulvil Pul"vil, n. [It. polviglio, fr. L. pulvis, pulveris, dust, powder: cf. Sp. polvillo.] A sweet-scented powder; pulvillio. [Written also pulville.] [Obs.] --Gay.
Pure villenage
Pure Pure, a. [Compar. Purer; superl. Purest.] [OE. pur, F. pur, fr. L. purus; akin to putus pure, clear, putare to clean, trim, prune, set in order, settle, reckon, consider, think, Skr. p? to clean, and perh. E. fire. Cf. Putative.] 1. Separate from all heterogeneous or extraneous matter; free from mixture or combination; clean; mere; simple; unmixed; as, pure water; pure clay; pure air; pure compassion. The pure fetters on his shins great. --Chaucer. A guinea is pure gold if it has in it no alloy. --I. Watts. 2. Free from moral defilement or quilt; hence, innocent; guileless; chaste; -- applied to persons. ``Keep thyself pure.' --1 Tim. v. 22. Now the end of the commandment is charity out of a pure heart, and of a good conscience. --1 Tim. i. 5. 3. Free from that which harms, vitiates, weakens, or pollutes; genuine; real; perfect; -- applied to things and actions. ``Pure religion and impartial laws.' --Tickell. ``The pure, fine talk of Rome.' --Ascham. Such was the origin of a friendship as warm and pure as any that ancient or modern history records. --Macaulay. 4. (Script.) Ritually clean; fitted for holy services. Thou shalt set them in two rows, six on a row, upon the pure table before the Lord. --Lev. xxiv. 6. 5. (Phonetics) Of a single, simple sound or tone; -- said of some vowels and the unaspirated consonants. Pure-impure, completely or totally impure. ``The inhabitants were pure-impure pagans.' --Fuller. Pure blue. (Chem.) See Methylene blue, under Methylene. Pure chemistry. See under Chemistry. Pure mathematics, that portion of mathematics which treats of the principles of the science, or contradistinction to applied mathematics, which treats of the application of the principles to the investigation of other branches of knowledge, or to the practical wants of life. See Mathematics. --Davies & Peck (Math. Dict. ) Pure villenage (Feudal Law), a tenure of lands by uncertain services at the will of the lord. --Blackstone. Syn: Unmixed; clear; simple; real; true; genuine; unadulterated; uncorrupted; unsullied; untarnished; unstained; stainless; clean; fair; unspotted; spotless; incorrupt; chaste; unpolluted; undefiled; immaculate; innocent; guiltless; guileless; holy.
Vaudeville
Vaudeville Vaude"ville, n. Loosely, and now commonly, variety (see above), as, to play in vaudeville; a vaudeville actor.
vaudeville show
Variety show Variety show A stage entertainment of successive separate performances, usually songs, dances, acrobatic feats, dramatic sketches, exhibitions of trained animals, or any specialties. Often loosely called vaudeville show.
Villein
Villein Vil"lein, n. (Feudal Law) See Villain, 1.
villein
Villain Vil"lain, n. [OE. vilein, F. vilain, LL. villanus, from villa a village, L. villa a farm. See Villa.] 1. (Feudal Law) One who holds lands by a base, or servile, tenure, or in villenage; a feudal tenant of the lowest class, a bondman or servant. [In this sense written also villan, and villein.] If any of my ansectors was a tenant, and a servant, and held his lands as a villain to his lord, his posterity also must do so, though accidentally they become noble. --Jer. Taylor. Note: Villains were of two sorts; villains regardant, that is, annexed to the manor (LL. adscripti gleb[ae]); and villains in gross, that is, annexed to the person of their lord, and transferable from one to another. --Blackstone. 2. A baseborn or clownish person; a boor. [R.] Pour the blood of the villain in one basin, and the blood of the gentleman in another, what difference shall there be proved? --Becon. 3. A vile, wicked person; a man extremely depraved, and capable or guilty of great crimes; a deliberate scoundrel; a knave; a rascal; a scamp. Like a villain with a smiling cheek. --Shak. Calm, thinking villains, whom no faith could fix. --Pope.
villeinage
Villanage Vil"lan*age (?; 48), n. [OF. villenage, vilenage. See Villain.] 1. (Feudal Law) The state of a villain, or serf; base servitude; tenure on condition of doing the meanest services for the lord. [In this sense written also villenage, and villeinage.] I speak even now as if sin were condemned in a perpetual villanage, never to be manumitted. --Milton. Some faint traces of villanage were detected by the curious so late as the days of the Stuarts. --Macaulay. 2. Baseness; infamy; villainy. [Obs.] --Dryden.
Villenage
Villenage Vil"len*age, n. [See Villanage.] (Feudal Law) Villanage. --Blackstone.
villenage
Villanage Vil"lan*age (?; 48), n. [OF. villenage, vilenage. See Villain.] 1. (Feudal Law) The state of a villain, or serf; base servitude; tenure on condition of doing the meanest services for the lord. [In this sense written also villenage, and villeinage.] I speak even now as if sin were condemned in a perpetual villanage, never to be manumitted. --Milton. Some faint traces of villanage were detected by the curious so late as the days of the Stuarts. --Macaulay. 2. Baseness; infamy; villainy. [Obs.] --Dryden.
Villenous
Villenous Vil"len*ous, a. Of or pertaining to a villein.
weevilled
Weeviled Wee"viled, a. Infested by weevils; as, weeviled grain. [Written also weevilled.]

Meaning of Ville from wikipedia

- Look up -ville in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Ville (French pronunciation: ​[vil]) is the French word nowadays meaning "city" or "town", but its...
- The Cadillac DeVille is the nameplate used by Cadillac over eight generations, originally used to designate a trim level of the 1949 Cadillac Series 62...
- Ville Hermanni Valo (pronounced [ˈʋilːe ˈʋɑlo] (listen); born 22 November 1976) is a Finnish singer, songwriter and musician. He is best known as the...
- Villé (French pronunciation: ​[vile]; German: Weiler) is a commune in the Bas-Rhin department and Grand Est region of north-eastern France. Communes of...
- Quebec City (/kwɪˈbɛk/ (listen) or /kəˈbɛk/; French: Ville de Québec), officially Québec ([kebɛk] (listen)), is the capital city of the Canadian province...
- Founded in 1642 as Ville-Marie, or "City of Mary", it is named after Mount Royal, the triple-peaked hill around which the early city of Ville-Marie is built...
- de ville de Bruxelles, Brussels Hôtel de Ville, Liège Canada Hôtel de ville de Montréal Hôtel de ville de Québec, Quebec City France Hôtel de Ville, Arras...
- Gr**** mythology. Paris is often referred to as the 'City of Light' (La Ville Lumière), both because of its leading role during the Age of Enlightenment...
- in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Deville, DeVille, De Ville, or de Vil may refer to: Cadillac DeVille, model of automobile produced between 1949 and...
- Nice-Ville station (French: Gare de Nice-Ville), also known as Nice-Thiers station (Gare de Nice-Thiers), is the main railway station of Nice, France...