Definition of Tinctoria. Meaning of Tinctoria. Synonyms of Tinctoria

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Definition of Tinctoria

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Alkanna tinctoria
Alkanet Al"ka*net, n. [Dim. of Sp. alcana, alhe[~n]a, in which al is the Ar. article. See Henna, and cf. Orchanet.] 1. (Chem.) A dyeing matter extracted from the roots of Alkanna tinctoria, which gives a fine deep red color. 2. (Bot.) (a) A boraginaceous herb (Alkanna tinctoria) yielding the dye; orchanet. (b) The similar plant Anchusa officinalis; bugloss; also, the American puccoon.
Alkanna tinctoria
Alkanet Al"ka*net, n. [Dim. of Sp. alcana, alhe[~n]a, in which al is the Ar. article. See Henna, and cf. Orchanet.] 1. (Chem.) A dyeing matter extracted from the roots of Alkanna tinctoria, which gives a fine deep red color. 2. (Bot.) (a) A boraginaceous herb (Alkanna tinctoria) yielding the dye; orchanet. (b) The similar plant Anchusa officinalis; bugloss; also, the American puccoon.
Baptisia tinctoria
2. (Chem.) A blue dyestuff obtained from several plants belonging to very different genera and orders; as, the woad, Isatis tinctoria, Indigofera tinctoria, I. Anil, Nereum tinctorium, etc. It is a dark blue earthy substance, tasteless and odorless, with a copper-violet luster when rubbed. Indigo does not exist in the plants as such, but is obtained by decomposition of the glycoside indican. Note: Commercial indigo contains the essential coloring principle indigo blue or indigotine, with several other dyes; as, indigo red, indigo brown, etc., and various impurities. Indigo is insoluble in ordinary reagents, with the exception of strong sulphuric acid. Chinese indigo (Bot.), Isatis indigotica, a kind of woad. Wild indigo (Bot.), the American herb Baptisia tinctoria which yields a poor quality of indigo, as do several other species of the same genus.
C tinctoria
Coreopsis Co`re*op"sis (k?`r?-?p"s?s), n. [NL., fr. Gr. ???? bug + ??? appearance.] (Bot.) A genus of herbaceous composite plants, having the achenes two-horned and remotely resembling some insect; tickseed. C. tinctoria, of the Western plains, the commonest plant of the genus, has been used in dyeing.
Chrozophora tinctoria
Turnsole Turn"sole`, n. [F. tournesol, It. tornasole; tornare to turn (LL. tornare) + sole the sun, L. sol. See Turn, Solar, a., and cf. Heliotrope.] [Written also turnsol.] 1. (Bot.) (a) A plant of the genus Heliotropium; heliotrope; -- so named because its flowers are supposed to turn toward the sun. (b) The sunflower. (c) A kind of spurge (Euphorbia Helioscopia). (d) The euphorbiaceous plant Chrozophora tinctoria. 2. (Chem.) (a) Litmus. [Obs.] (b) A purple dye obtained from the plant turnsole. See def. 1 (d) .
Cladrastis tinctoria
Yellowwood Yel"low*wood`, n. (Bot.) The wood of any one of several different kinds of trees; also, any one of the trees themselves. Among the trees so called are the Cladrastis tinctoria, an American leguminous tree; the several species of prickly ash (Xanthoxylum); the Australian Flindersia Oxleyana, a tree related to the mahogany; certain South African species of Podocarpus, trees related to the yew; the East Indian Podocarpus latifolia; and the true satinwood (Chloroxylon Swietenia). All these Old World trees furnish valuable timber.
I tinctoria
Indigo In"di*go, a. Having the color of, pertaining to, or derived from, indigo. Indigo berry (Bot.), the fruit of the West Indian shrub Randia aculeata, used as a blue dye. Indigo bird (Zo["o]l.), a small North American finch (Cyanospiza cyanea). The male is indigo blue in color. Called also indigo bunting. Indigo blue. (a) The essential coloring material of commercial indigo, from which it is obtained as a dark blue earthy powder, with a reddish luster, C16H10N2O2, which may be crystallized by sublimation. Indigo blue is also made from artificial amido cinnamic acid, and from artificial isatine; and these methods are of great commercial importance. Called also indigotin. (b) A dark, dull blue color like the indigo of commerce. Indigo brown (Chem.), a brown resinous substance found in crude indigo. Indigo copper (Min.), covellite. Indigo green, a green obtained from indigo. Indigo plant (Bot.), a leguminous plant of several species (genus Indigofera), from which indigo is prepared. The different varieties are natives of Asia, Africa, and America. Several species are cultivated, of which the most important are the I. tinctoria, or common indigo plant, the I. Anil, a larger species, and the I. disperma. Indigo purple, a purple obtained from indigo. Indigo red, a dyestuff, isomeric with indigo blue, obtained from crude indigo as a dark brown amorphous powder. Indigo snake (Zo["o]l.), the gopher snake. Indigo white, a white crystalline powder obtained by reduction from indigo blue, and by oxidation easily changed back to it; -- called also indigogen. Indigo yellow, a substance obtained from indigo.
Indigofera tinctoria
2. (Chem.) A blue dyestuff obtained from several plants belonging to very different genera and orders; as, the woad, Isatis tinctoria, Indigofera tinctoria, I. Anil, Nereum tinctorium, etc. It is a dark blue earthy substance, tasteless and odorless, with a copper-violet luster when rubbed. Indigo does not exist in the plants as such, but is obtained by decomposition of the glycoside indican. Note: Commercial indigo contains the essential coloring principle indigo blue or indigotine, with several other dyes; as, indigo red, indigo brown, etc., and various impurities. Indigo is insoluble in ordinary reagents, with the exception of strong sulphuric acid. Chinese indigo (Bot.), Isatis indigotica, a kind of woad. Wild indigo (Bot.), the American herb Baptisia tinctoria which yields a poor quality of indigo, as do several other species of the same genus.
Indigofera tinctoria
Indigofera In`di*gof"e*ra, n. [NL., from E. indigo + L. ferre to bear.] (Bot.) A genus of leguminous plants having many species, mostly in tropical countries, several of them yielding indigo, esp. Indigofera tinctoria, and I. Anil.
Isatis tinctoria
2. (Chem.) A blue dyestuff obtained from several plants belonging to very different genera and orders; as, the woad, Isatis tinctoria, Indigofera tinctoria, I. Anil, Nereum tinctorium, etc. It is a dark blue earthy substance, tasteless and odorless, with a copper-violet luster when rubbed. Indigo does not exist in the plants as such, but is obtained by decomposition of the glycoside indican. Note: Commercial indigo contains the essential coloring principle indigo blue or indigotine, with several other dyes; as, indigo red, indigo brown, etc., and various impurities. Indigo is insoluble in ordinary reagents, with the exception of strong sulphuric acid. Chinese indigo (Bot.), Isatis indigotica, a kind of woad. Wild indigo (Bot.), the American herb Baptisia tinctoria which yields a poor quality of indigo, as do several other species of the same genus.
Isatis tinctoria
Isatis I"sa*tis (?; 277), n. [L., a kind of plant, Gr. ? woad.] (Bot.) A genus of herbs, some species of which, especially the Isatis tinctoria, yield a blue dye similar to indigo; woad.
Isatis tinctoria
Woad Woad, n. [OE. wod, AS. w[=a]d; akin to D. weede, G. waid, OHG. weit, Dan. vaid, veid, Sw. veide, L. vitrum.] [Written also wad, and wade.] 1. (Bot.) An herbaceous cruciferous plant (Isatis tinctoria). It was formerly cultivated for the blue coloring matter derived from its leaves. 2. A blue dyestuff, or coloring matter, consisting of the powdered and fermented leaves of the Isatis tinctoria. It is now superseded by indigo, but is somewhat used with indigo as a ferment in dyeing. Their bodies . . . painted with woad in sundry figures. --Milton. Wild woad (Bot.), the weld (Reseda luteola). See Weld. Woad mill, a mill grinding and preparing woad.
Isatis tinctoria
Pastel Pas"tel, n. [F.; cf. It. pastello. Cf. Pastil.] 1. A crayon made of a paste composed of a color ground with gum water. [Sometimes incorrectly written pastil.] ``Charming heads in pastel.' --W. Black. 2. (Bot.) A plant affording a blue dye; the woad (Isatis tinctoria); also, the dye itself.
Maclura formerly Morus tinctoria
Morintannic Mo`rin*tan"nic, a. [NL. Morus fustic + E. tannic.] (Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, a variety of tannic acid extracted from fustic (Maclura, formerly Morus, tinctoria) as a yellow crystalline substance; -- called also maclurin.
Maclura tinctoria
Morin Mo"rin, n. (Chem.) A yellow crystalline substance of acid properties extracted from fustic (Maclura tinctoria, formerly called Morus tinctoria); -- called also moric acid.
Maclura tinctoria
Fustic Fus"tic, n. [F. fustoc, Sp. fustoc. Cf. Fustet.] The wood of the Maclura tinctoria, a tree growing in the West Indies, used in dyeing yellow; -- called also old fustic. [Written also fustoc.] Note: Other kinds of yellow wood are often called fustic; as that of species of Xanthoxylum, and especially the Rhus Cotinus, which is sometimes called young fustic to distinguish it from the Maclura. See Fustet.
Marsdenia tinctoria
Marsdenia Mars*de"ni*a, n. [NL. From W. Marsden, an English author.] (Bot.) A genus of plants of the Milkweed family, mostly woody climbers with fragrant flowers, several species of which furnish valuable fiber, and one species (Marsdenia tinctoria) affords indigo.
Morus tinctoria
Morin Mo"rin, n. (Chem.) A yellow crystalline substance of acid properties extracted from fustic (Maclura tinctoria, formerly called Morus tinctoria); -- called also moric acid.
Q tinctoria
Oak Oak ([=o]k), n. [OE. oke, ok, ak, AS. [=a]c; akin to D. eik, G. eiche, OHG. eih, Icel. eik, Sw. ek, Dan. eeg.] 1. (Bot.) Any tree or shrub of the genus Quercus. The oaks have alternate leaves, often variously lobed, and staminate flowers in catkins. The fruit is a smooth nut, called an acorn, which is more or less inclosed in a scaly involucre called the cup or cupule. There are now recognized about three hundred species, of which nearly fifty occur in the United States, the rest in Europe, Asia, and the other parts of North America, a very few barely reaching the northern parts of South America and Africa. Many of the oaks form forest trees of grand proportions and live many centuries. The wood is usually hard and tough, and provided with conspicuous medullary rays, forming the silver grain. 2. The strong wood or timber of the oak. Note: Among the true oaks in America are: Barren oak, or Black-jack, Q. nigra. Basket oak, Q. Michauxii. Black oak, Q. tinctoria; -- called also yellow or quercitron oak. Bur oak (see under Bur.), Q. macrocarpa; -- called also over-cup or mossy-cup oak. Chestnut oak, Q. Prinus and Q. densiflora. Chinquapin oak (see under Chinquapin), Q. prinoides. Coast live oak, Q. agrifolia, of California; -- also called enceno. Live oak (see under Live), Q. virens, the best of all for shipbuilding; also, Q. Chrysolepis, of California. Pin oak. Same as Swamp oak. Post oak, Q. obtusifolia. Red oak, Q. rubra. Scarlet oak, Q. coccinea. Scrub oak, Q. ilicifolia, Q. undulata, etc. Shingle oak, Q. imbricaria. Spanish oak, Q. falcata. Swamp Spanish oak, or Pin oak, Q. palustris. Swamp white oak, Q. bicolor. Water oak, Q. aguatica. Water white oak, Q. lyrata. Willow oak, Q. Phellos. Among the true oaks in Europe are: Bitter oak, or Turkey oak, Q. Cerris (see Cerris). Cork oak, Q. Suber. English white oak, Q. Robur. Evergreen oak, Holly oak, or Holm oak, Q. Ilex. Kermes oak, Q. coccifera. Nutgall oak, Q. infectoria. Note: Among plants called oak, but not of the genus Quercus, are: African oak, a valuable timber tree (Oldfieldia Africana). Australian, or She, oak, any tree of the genus Casuarina (see Casuarina). Indian oak, the teak tree (see Teak). Jerusalem oak. See under Jerusalem. New Zealand oak, a sapindaceous tree (Alectryon excelsum). Poison oak, the poison ivy. See under Poison.
Roccella tinctoria
Litmus Lit"mus, n. [D. lakmoes; lak lacker + moes a thick preparation of fruit, pap, prob. akin to E. meat: cf. G. lackmus. See Lac a resinous substance.] (Chem.) A dyestuff extracted from certain lichens (Roccella tinctoria, Lecanora tartarea, etc.), as a blue amorphous mass which consists of a compound of the alkaline carbonates with certain coloring matters related to orcin and orcein. Note: Litmus is used as a dye, and being turned red by acids and restored to its blue color by alkalies, is a common indicator or test for acidity and alkalinity. Litmus paper (Chem.), unsized paper saturated with blue or red litmus, -- used in testing for acids or alkalies.
Roccella tinctoria
Roccellic Roc*cel"lic, a. [F. roccellique, fr. roccelle archil, It. & NL. roccella, fr. It. rocca a rock, because archil grows on rock.] (Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, a dibasic acid of the oxalic series found in archil (Roccella tinctoria, etc.), and other lichens, and extracted as a white crystalline substance C17H32O4.
Roccella tinctoria
Archil Ar"chil (?; 277), n. [OF. orchel, orcheil, It. orcella, oricello, or OSp. orchillo. Cf. Orchil.] 1. A violet dye obtained from several species of lichen (Roccella tinctoria, etc.), which grow on maritime rocks in the Canary and Cape Verd Islands, etc. --Tomlinson. 2. The plant from which the dye is obtained. [Written also orchal and orchil.]
Rubia tinctoria
Rubiaceous Ru`bi*a"ceous, a. [L. rubia madder, fr. rubeus red.] (Bot.) Of or pertaining to a very large natural order of plants (Rubiace[ae]) named after the madder (Rubia tinctoria), and including about three hundred and seventy genera and over four thousand species. Among them are the coffee tree, the trees yielding peruvian bark and quinine, the madder, the quaker ladies, and the trees bearing the edible fruits called genipap and Sierre Leone peach, besides many plants noted for the beauty or the fragrance of their blossoms.
Tinctorial
Tinctorial Tinc*to"ri*al, a. [L. tinctorius, from tinctor a dyer, tingere, tinctum, to dye: cf. F. tinctorial. See Tinge.] Of or relating to color or colors; imparting a color; as, tinctorial matter. --Ure.

Meaning of Tinctoria from wikipedia

- Indigofera tinctoria, also called true indigo, is a species of plant from the bean family that was one of the original sources of indigo dye. It has been...
- Isatis tinctoria, also called woad (/ˈwoʊd/), dyer's woad, or glastum, is a flowering plant in the family Br****icaceae. It is occasionally known as Asp...
- A. tinctoria may refer to: Alkanna tinctoria, the alkanet or dyers' bugloss, a plant species Anchusa tinctoria, a plant species in the genus Anchusa Anthemis...
- Theropithicus gelada tinctorius L for dyeing woad, Isatis tinctoria tinctoriustinctoriatinctorium tomentosus L furry bristle-tail filefish, Acreichthys...
- Wrightia tinctoria, Pala indigo plant or dyer's oleander, is a flowering plant species in the genus Wrightia found in India, southeast Asia and Australia...
- Cota tinctoria, the golden marguerite, yellow chamomile, or oxeye chamomile, is a species of perennial flowering plant in the sunflower family. Other...
- Alkanna tinctoria, the dyer's alkanet or alkanet, is a herb in the borage family. Its main notability is its roots are used as a red dye. The plant is...
- Persicaria tinctoria is a species of flowering plant in the buckwheat family. Common names include Chinese indigo and ****anese indigo. It is native to...
- Roccella tinctoria is a lichenised species of fungus in the genus Roccella, homotypic synonym of Lecanora tinctoria (DC.) Czerwiak., 1849. It was first...
- Maclura tinctoria, commonly known as old fustic or dyer's mulberry is a medium to large tree of the Neotropics, from Mexico to Argentina. It produces...
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