Definition of Tenure by fee alms. Meaning of Tenure by fee alms. Synonyms of Tenure by fee alms

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Definition of Tenure by fee alms

Tenure by fee alms
Tenure Ten"ure, n. [F. tenure, OF. teneure, fr. F. tenir to hold. See Tenable.] 1. The act or right of holding, as property, especially real estate. That the tenure of estates might rest on equity, the Indian title to lands was in all cases to be quieted. --Bancroft. 2. (Eng. Law) The manner of holding lands and tenements of a superior. Note: Tenure is inseparable from the idea of property in land, according to the theory of the English law; and this idea of tenure pervades, to a considerable extent, the law of real property in the United States, where the title to land is essentially allodial, and almost all lands are held in fee simple, not of a superior, but the whole right and title to the property being vested in the owner. Tenure, in general, then, is the particular manner of holding real estate, as by exclusive title or ownership, by fee simple, by fee tail, by courtesy, in dower, by copyhold, by lease, at will, etc. 3. The consideration, condition, or service which the occupier of land gives to his lord or superior for the use of his land. 4. Manner of holding, in general; as, in absolute governments, men hold their rights by a precarious tenure. All that seems thine own, Held by the tenure of his will alone. --Cowper. Tenure by fee alms. (Law) See Frankalmoigne.

Meaning of Tenure by fee alms from wikipedia

- Copyhold tenure was a form of customary tenure of land common in England from the Middle Ages. The land was held according to the custom of the manor...
- the rector's income, out of which he lived, and kept the Church. Communion alms met some of the needs of the poor. Often the patron or another landowner...
- visitors to Bethlem – there never was an official fee – probably grew out of the monastic custom of alms giving to the poor. While a substantial proportion...
- perpetual alms" would be free from all secular services. However, if a mesne (i.e. intermediate) lord was involved, then services such as socage, fee and other...
- supervised the programme which was completed by 1936. The Friends funded the project, which created 360 kneelers, 96 alms bags, 36 long cushions, 1 lectern ****...
- Tammany Hall operatives continued their practice of paying prisoners of the alms houses for votes and also paying for votes at their polling places. Throughout...
- eleemosynary (alms) fine to be paid to the Congregation and applied by it to pious uses; an alms imposed on the petitioners and to be distributed by themselves...
- late Middle Ages; tenure on the court was generally bought from the royal authority; and such positions could be made hereditary by payment of a tax to...
- monasteries and French hospitals. They dispensed alms and some medicine, and were generously endowed by the nobility and gentry who counted on them for...
- relief) or other disqualifying alms:- 1. THE OWNERSHIP FRANCHISE. (a) FREEHOLDERS:- (1) Persons possessed in fee simple or fee tail of a freehold estate in...
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