Definition of Tance. Meaning of Tance. Synonyms of Tance

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Definition of Tance

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A speaking acquaintance
Speaking Speak"ing, a. 1. Uttering speech; used for conveying speech; as, man is a speaking animal; a speaking tube. 2. Seeming to be capable of speech; hence, lifelike; as, a speaking likeness. A speaking acquaintance, a slight acquaintance with a person, or one which merely permits the exchange of salutations and remarks on indifferent subjects. Speaking trumpet, an instrument somewhat resembling a trumpet, by which the sound of the human voice may be so intensified as to be conveyed to a great distance. Speaking tube, a tube for conveying speech, especially from one room to another at a distance. To be on speaking terms, to be slightly acquainted.
Acceptance
Acceptance Ac*cept"ance, n. 1. The act of accepting; a receiving what is offered, with approbation, satisfaction, or acquiescence; esp., favorable reception; approval; as, the acceptance of a gift, office, doctrine, etc. They shall come up with acceptance on mine altar. --Isa. lx. 7. 2. State of being accepted; acceptableness. ``Makes it assured of acceptance.' --Shak. 3. (Com.) (a) An assent and engagement by the person on whom a bill of exchange is drawn, to pay it when due according to the terms of the acceptance. (b) The bill itself when accepted. 4. An agreeing to terms or proposals by which a bargain is concluded and the parties are bound; the reception or taking of a thing bought as that for which it was bought, or as that agreed to be delivered, or the taking possession as owner. 5. (Law) An agreeing to the action of another, by some act which binds the person in law. Note: What acts shall amount to such an acceptance is often a question of great nicety and difficulty. --Mozley & W.
Acceptance of a bill of exchange
Note: In modern law, proposal and acceptance are the constituent elements into which all contracts are resolved. Acceptance of a bill of exchange, check, draft, or order, is an engagement to pay it according to the terms. This engagement is usually made by writing the word ``accepted' across the face of the bill. Acceptance of goods, under the statute of frauds, is an intelligent acceptance by a party knowing the nature of the transaction. 6. Meaning; acceptation. [Obs.] Acceptance of persons, partiality, favoritism. See under Accept.
Acceptance of goods
Note: In modern law, proposal and acceptance are the constituent elements into which all contracts are resolved. Acceptance of a bill of exchange, check, draft, or order, is an engagement to pay it according to the terms. This engagement is usually made by writing the word ``accepted' across the face of the bill. Acceptance of goods, under the statute of frauds, is an intelligent acceptance by a party knowing the nature of the transaction. 6. Meaning; acceptation. [Obs.] Acceptance of persons, partiality, favoritism. See under Accept.
Acceptance of persons
Note: In modern law, proposal and acceptance are the constituent elements into which all contracts are resolved. Acceptance of a bill of exchange, check, draft, or order, is an engagement to pay it according to the terms. This engagement is usually made by writing the word ``accepted' across the face of the bill. Acceptance of goods, under the statute of frauds, is an intelligent acceptance by a party knowing the nature of the transaction. 6. Meaning; acceptation. [Obs.] Acceptance of persons, partiality, favoritism. See under Accept.
Acquaintance
Acquaintance Ac*quaint"ance, n. [OE. aqueintance, OF. acointance, fr. acointier. See Acquaint.] 1. A state of being acquainted, or of having intimate, or more than slight or superficial, knowledge; personal knowledge gained by intercourse short of that of friendship or intimacy; as, I know the man; but have no acquaintance with him. Contract no friendship, or even acquaintance, with a guileful man. --Sir W. Jones. 2. A person or persons with whom one is acquainted. Montgomery was an old acquaintance of Ferguson. --Macaulay. Note: In this sense the collective term acquaintance was formerly both singular and plural, but it is now commonly singular, and has the regular plural acquaintances. To be of acquaintance, to be intimate. To take acquaintance of or with, to make the acquaintance of. [Obs.] Syn: Familiarity; intimacy; fellowship; knowledge. Usage: Acquaintance, Familiarity, Intimacy. These words mark different degrees of closeness in social intercourse. Acquaintance arises from occasional intercourse; as, our acquaintance has been a brief one. We can speak of a slight or an intimate acquaintance. Familiarity is the result of continued acquaintance. It springs from persons being frequently together, so as to wear off all restraint and reserve; as, the familiarity of old companions. Intimacy is the result of close connection, and the freest interchange of thought; as, the intimacy of established friendship. Our admiration of a famous man lessens upon our nearer acquaintance with him. --Addison. We contract at last such a familiarity with them as makes it difficult and irksome for us to call off our minds. --Atterbury. It is in our power to confine our friendships and intimacies to men of virtue. --Rogers.
Acquaintanceship
Acquaintanceship Ac*quaint"ance*ship, n. A state of being acquainted; acquaintance. --Southey.
Acquittance
Acquittance Ac*quit"tance, n. [OF. aquitance, fr. aquiter. See Acquit.] 1. The clearing off of debt or obligation; a release or discharge from debt or other liability. 2. A writing which is evidence of a discharge; a receipt in full, which bars a further demand. You can produce acquittances For such a sum, from special officers. --Shak.
Acquittance
Acquittance Ac*quit"tance, v. t. To acquit. [Obs.] --Shak.
Admittance
Admittance Ad*mit"tance, n. (Elec.) The reciprocal of impedance.
Admittance
Admittance Ad*mit"tance, n. 1. The act of admitting. 2. Permission to enter; the power or right of entrance; also, actual entrance; reception. To gain admittance into the house. --South. He desires admittance to the king. --Dryden. To give admittance to a thought of fear. --Shak. 3. Concession; admission; allowance; as, the admittance of an argument. [Obs.] --Sir T. Browne. 4. Admissibility. [Obs.] --Shak. 5. (Eng. Law) The act of giving possession of a copyhold estate. --Bouvier. Syn: Admission; access; entrance; initiation. Usage: Admittance, Admission. These words are, to some extent, in a state of transition and change. Admittance is now chiefly confined to its primary sense of access into some locality or building. Thus we see on the doors of factories, shops, etc. ``No admittance.' Its secondary or moral sense, as ``admittance to the church,' is almost entirely laid aside. Admission has taken to itself the secondary or figurative senses; as, admission to the rights of citizenship; admission to the church; the admissions made by one of the parties in a dispute. And even when used in its primary sense, it is not identical with admittance. Thus, we speak of admission into a country, territory, and other larger localities, etc., where admittance could not be used. So, when we speak of admission to a concert or other public assembly, the meaning is not perhaps exactly that of admittance, viz., access within the walls of the building, but rather a reception into the audience, or access to the performances. But the lines of distinction on this subject are one definitely drawn.
Angular distance
Angular An"gu*lar, a. [L. angularis, fr. angulus angle, corner. See Angle.] 1. Relating to an angle or to angles; having an angle or angles; forming an angle or corner; sharp-cornered; pointed; as, an angular figure. 2. Measured by an angle; as, angular distance. 3. Fig.: Lean; lank; raw-boned; ungraceful; sharp and stiff in character; as, remarkably angular in his habits and appearance; an angular female. Angular aperture, Angular distance. See Aperture, Distance. Angular motion, the motion of a body about a fixed point or fixed axis, as of a planet or pendulum. It is equal to the angle passed over at the point or axis by a line drawn to the body. Angular point, the point at which the sides of the angle meet; the vertex. Angular velocity, the ratio of anuglar motion to the time employed in describing.
Assistance
Assistance As*sist"ance, n. [Cf. F. assistance.] 1. The act of assisting; help; aid; furtherance; succor; support. Without the assistance of a mortal hand. --Shak. 2. An assistant or helper; a body of helpers. [Obs.] Wat Tyler [was] killed by valiant Walworth, the lord mayor of London, and his assistance, . . . John Cavendish. --Fuller. 3. Persons present. [Obs. or a Gallicism]
Boastance
Boastance Boast"ance, n. Boasting. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
Causes of instance
Instance In"stance, n. [F. instance, L. instantia, fr. instans. See Instant.] 1. The act or quality of being instant or pressing; urgency; solicitation; application; suggestion; motion. Undertook at her instance to restore them. --Sir W. Scott. 2. That which is instant or urgent; motive. [Obs.] The instances that second marriage move Are base respects of thrift, but none of love. --Shak. 3. Occasion; order of occurrence. These seem as if, in the time of Edward I., they were drawn up into the form of a law, in the first instance. --Sir M. Hale. 4. That which offers itself or is offered as an illustrative case; something cited in proof or exemplification; a case occurring; an example. Most remarkable instances of suffering. --Atterbury. 5. A token; a sign; a symptom or indication. --Shak. Causes of instance, those which proceed at the solicitation of some party. --Hallifax. Court of first instance, the court by which a case is first tried. For instance, by way of example or illustration. Instance Court (Law), the Court of Admiralty acting within its ordinary jurisdiction, as distinguished from its action as a prize court. Syn: Example; case. See Example.
Circumstance
Circumstance Cir"cum*stance, v. t. To place in a particular situation; to supply relative incidents. The poet took the matters of fact as they came down to him and circumstanced them, after his own manner. --Addison.
Circumstance
Circumstance Cir"cum*stance, n. [L. circumstantia, fr. circumstans, -antis, p. pr. of circumstare to stand around; circum + stare to stand. See Stand.] 1. That which attends, or relates to, or in some way affects, a fact or event; an attendant thing or state of things. The circumstances are well known in the country where they happened. --W. Irving. 2. An event; a fact; a particular incident. The sculptor had in his thoughts the conqueror weeping for new worlds, or the like circumstances in history. --Addison. 3. Circumlocution; detail. [Obs.] So without more circumstance at all I hold it fit that we shake hands and part. --Shak. 4. pl. Condition in regard to worldly estate; state of property; situation; surroundings. When men are easy in their circumstances, they are naturally enemies to innovations. --Addison. Not a circumstance, of no account. [Colloq.] Under the circumstances, taking all things into consideration. Syn: Event; occurrence; incident; situation; condition; position; fact; detail; item. See Event.
Circumstanced
Circumstanced Cir"cum*stanced, p. a. 1. Placed in a particular position or condition; situated. The proposition is, that two bodies so circumstanced will balance each other. --Whewell. 2. Governed by events or circumstances. [Poetic & R.] ``I must be circumstanced.' --Shak.
Coinheritance
Coinheritance Co`in*her"it*ance, n. Joint inheritance.
Comportance
Comportance Com*port"ance, n. Behavior; comport. [Obs.] Goodly comportance each to other bear. --Spenser.
Concomitance
Concomitance Con*com"i*tance, Concomitancy Con*com"i*tan*cy, n. [Cf. F. concomitance, fr. LL. concomitantia.] 1. The state of accompanying; accompaniment. The secondary action subsisteth not alone, but in concomitancy with the other. --Sir T. Browne. 2. (R.C.Ch.) The doctrine of the existence of the entire body of Christ in the eucharist, under each element, so that the body and blood are both received by communicating in one kind only.
Court of first instance
Instance In"stance, n. [F. instance, L. instantia, fr. instans. See Instant.] 1. The act or quality of being instant or pressing; urgency; solicitation; application; suggestion; motion. Undertook at her instance to restore them. --Sir W. Scott. 2. That which is instant or urgent; motive. [Obs.] The instances that second marriage move Are base respects of thrift, but none of love. --Shak. 3. Occasion; order of occurrence. These seem as if, in the time of Edward I., they were drawn up into the form of a law, in the first instance. --Sir M. Hale. 4. That which offers itself or is offered as an illustrative case; something cited in proof or exemplification; a case occurring; an example. Most remarkable instances of suffering. --Atterbury. 5. A token; a sign; a symptom or indication. --Shak. Causes of instance, those which proceed at the solicitation of some party. --Hallifax. Court of first instance, the court by which a case is first tried. For instance, by way of example or illustration. Instance Court (Law), the Court of Admiralty acting within its ordinary jurisdiction, as distinguished from its action as a prize court. Syn: Example; case. See Example.
Desistance
Desistance De*sist"ance, n. [Cf. F. desistance.] The act or state of desisting; cessation. [R.] --Boyle. If fatigue of body or brain were in every case followed by desistance . . . then would the system be but seldom out of working order. --H. Spencer.
Disacquaintance
Disacquaintance Dis`ac*quaint"ance, n. Neglect of disuse of familiarity, or familiar acquaintance. [Obs.] --South.
Disheritance
Disheritance Dis*her"it*ance, n. [Cf. OF. desheritance.] The act of disinheriting or state of being disinherited; disinheritance. [Obs.] --Beau. & Fl.
Disinheritance
Disinheritance Dis`in*her"it*ance, n. The act of disinheriting, or the condition of being; disinherited; disherison.
Distance
Distance Dis"tance, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Distanced; p. pr. & vb. n. Distancing.] 1. To place at a distance or remotely. I heard nothing thereof at Oxford, being then miles distanced thence. --Fuller. 2. To cause to appear as if at a distance; to make seem remote. His peculiar art of distancing an object to aggrandize his space. --H. Miller. 3. To outstrip by as much as a distance (see Distance, n., 3); to leave far behind; to surpass greatly. He distanced the most skillful of his contemporaries. --Milner.
Distanced
Distance Dis"tance, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Distanced; p. pr. & vb. n. Distancing.] 1. To place at a distance or remotely. I heard nothing thereof at Oxford, being then miles distanced thence. --Fuller. 2. To cause to appear as if at a distance; to make seem remote. His peculiar art of distancing an object to aggrandize his space. --H. Miller. 3. To outstrip by as much as a distance (see Distance, n., 3); to leave far behind; to surpass greatly. He distanced the most skillful of his contemporaries. --Milner.
Doubtance
Doubtance Doubt"ance, n. [OF. doutance. Cf. Dubitancy.] State of being in doubt; uncertainty; doubt. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
Entreatance
Entreatance En*treat"ance, n. Entreaty. [Obs.] --Fairfax.

Meaning of Tance from wikipedia

- The Slavonic Dances (Czech: Slovanské tance) are a series of 16 orchestral pieces composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1878 and 1886 and published in two sets...
- dances (singular: taniec ludowy, pronounced [ˈtaɲɛts luˈdɔvɨ]; plural: tańce ludowe [ˈtaɲtsɛ luˈdɔvɛ]) tend to be lively, energetic, and joyful. Hops...
- James "Tancy" Lee (31 January 1882 – 5 February 1941) was a Scottish professional boxer who competed from 1906 to 1926. He held the IBU world, EBU European...
- Fô-Tancé is a town and arrondis****t in the Atakora Department of northwestern Benin. It is an administrative division under the jurisdiction of the...
- tancovalo: dějiny tance v Čechách, na Moravě, ve Slezsku a na Slovensku z věků nejstarších až do nové doby se zvláštním zřetelem k dějinám tance vůbec", Prague...
- życia, mowa, podania, przysłowia, obrzędy, gusła, zabawy, pieśni, muzyka i tańce. Serya XIV. Kraków: w drukarni Dr. Ludwika Gumplowicza. 1881. pp. 3-7. [3]...
- The Dance Teacher (Czech: Učitel tance) is a 1995 Czech drama film directed by Jaromil Jireš. Martin Dejdar - Richard Majer Jana Hlaváčová - Head nurse...
- American Film Festival in 2010. In 2010, Thorne replaced Jolean Wejbe as Tancy "Teenie" Henrickson, Bill and Barb's younger daughter in Season 4 of HBO's...
- machine Sampler Synthesizer Derivative forms Urban Subgenres Bhangragga Urban Tance R&B EDM (complete list) Regional scenes Asian Underground Bangladeshi hip...
- The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Soon after third child Tancy's birth, however, Barbara Henrickson was diagnosed with uterine cancer,...
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