Definition of C. Meaning of C. Synonyms of C

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word C. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word C and, of course, C synonyms and on the right images related to the word C.

Definition of C

C
Symbol Sym"bol, n. [L. symbolus, symbolum, Gr. sy`mbolon a sign by which one knows or infers a thing, from ? to throw or put together, to compare; sy`n with + ? to throw: cf. F. symbole. Cf. Emblem, Parable.] 1. A visible sign or representation of an idea; anything which suggests an idea or quality, or another thing, as by resemblance or by convention; an emblem; a representation; a type; a figure; as, the lion is the symbol of courage; the lamb is the symbol of meekness or patience. A symbol is a sign included in the idea which it represents, e. g., an actual part chosen to represent the whole, or a lower form or species used as the representative of a higher in the same kind. --Coleridge. 2. (Math.) Any character used to represent a quantity, an operation, a relation, or an abbreviation. Note: In crystallography, the symbol of a plane is the numerical expression which defines its position relatively to the assumed axes. 3. (Theol.) An abstract or compendium of faith or doctrine; a creed, or a summary of the articles of religion. 4. [Gr. ? contributions.] That which is thrown into a common fund; hence, an appointed or accustomed duty. [Obs.] They do their work in the days of peace . . . and come to pay their symbol in a war or in a plague. --Jer. Taylor. 5. Share; allotment. [Obs.] The persons who are to be judged . . . shall all appear to receive their symbol. --Jer. Taylor. 6. (Chem.) An abbreviation standing for the name of an element and consisting of the initial letter of the Latin or New Latin name, or sometimes of the initial letter with a following one; as, C for carbon, Na for sodium (Natrium), Fe for iron (Ferrum), Sn for tin (Stannum), Sb for antimony (Stibium), etc. See the list of names and symbols under Element. Note: In pure and organic chemistry there are symbols not only for the elements, but also for their grouping in formulas, radicals, or residues, as evidenced by their composition, reactions, synthesis, etc. See the diagram of Benzene nucleus, under Benzene. Syn: Emblem; figure; type. See Emblem.
C
C C (s[=e]) 1. C is the third letter of the English alphabet. It is from the Latin letter C, which in old Latin represented the sounds of k, and g (in go); its original value being the latter. In Anglo-Saxon words, or Old English before the Norman Conquest, it always has the sound of k. The Latin C was the same letter as the Greek [Gamma], [gamma], and came from the Greek alphabet. The Greeks got it from the Ph[oe]nicians. The English name of C is from the Latin name ce, and was derived, probably, through the French. Etymologically C is related to g, h, k, q, s (and other sibilant sounds). Examples of these relations are in L. acutus, E. acute, ague; E. acrid, eager, vinegar; L. cornu, E. horn; E. cat, kitten; E. coy, quiet; L. circare, OF. cerchier, E. search. Note: See Guide to Pronunciation, [sect][sect] 221-228. 2. (Mus.) (a) The keynote of the normal or ``natural' scale, which has neither flats nor sharps in its signature; also, the third note of the relative minor scale of the same. (b) C after the clef is the mark of common time, in which each measure is a semibreve (four fourths or crotchets); for alla breve time it is written ?. (c) The ``C clef,' a modification of the letter C, placed on any line of the staff, shows that line to be middle C. 3. As a numeral, C stands for Latin centum or 100, CC for 200, etc. C spring, a spring in the form of the letter C.
c
Gastropoda Gas*trop"o*da, n. pl., [NL., fr. Gr. ?, ?, stomach + -poda.] (Zo["o]l.) One of the classes of Mollusca, of great extent. It includes most of the marine spiral shells, and the land and fresh-water snails. They generally creep by means of a flat, muscular disk, or foot, on the ventral side of the body. The head usually bears one or two pairs of tentacles. See Mollusca. [Written also Gasteropoda.] Note: The Gastropoda are divided into three subclasses; viz.: (a) The Streptoneura or Dioecia, including the Pectinibranchiata, Rhipidoglossa, Docoglossa, and Heteropoda. (b) The Euthyneura, including the Pulmonata and Opisthobranchia. (c) The Amphineura, including the Polyplacophora and Aplacophora.

Meaning of C from wikipedia

- romanization during the mid-1950s Add to C with diacritics C with diacritics: Ć ć Ĉ ĉ Č č Ċ ċ Ƈ ƈ Ȼ ȼ Ç ç Ꞔ ꞔ Ꞓ ꞓ  : Claudian letters © : copyright...
- C++ (/ˌsiːˌplʌsˈplʌs/) is a general-purpose programming language created by Bjarne Stroustrup as an extension of the C programming language, or "C with...
- Enclosed C or circled Latin C ( or ) is a typographical symbol. As one of many enclosed alphanumerics, the symbol is a "C" within a circle. The capitalized...
- c , d ) = ( a + c , b + d ) ( a , b ) ⋅ ( c , d ) = ( a c − b d , b c + a d ) . {\displaystyle {\begin{aligned}(a,b)+(c,d)&=(a+c,b+d)\\(a,b)\cdot (c,d)&=(ac-bd...
- C+ or C Plus may refer to: C++, a programming language ABCL/c+, a programming language C+ (grade), an academic grade Faster-than-light travel, above the...
- Ç or ç (c-cedilla) is a Latin script letter, used in the Albanian, Azerbaijani, Manx, Tatar, Turkish, Turkmen, Kurdish, Zazaki, and Portuguese alphabets...
- The Phonetic Extensions Supplement block has several more: Latin/IPA ᶛ ᶞ ᶟ ᶠ ᶡ ᶢ ᶣ ᶤ ᶥ ᶦ ᶧ ᶨ ᶩ ᶪ ᶫ ᶬ ᶭ ᶮ ᶯ ᶰ ᶱ ᶲ ᶳ ᶴ ᶵ ᶶ ᶷ ᶸ ᶹ ᶺ ᶻ ᶼ ᶽ ᶾ, Gr****...
- 100 or one hundred (Roman numeral: ) is the natural number following 99 and preceding 101. In medieval contexts, it may be described as the short hundred...
- {c}}^{n}=\aleph _{0}{\mathfrak {c}}=n{\mathfrak {c}}={\mathfrak {c}},} where n is any finite cardinal ≥ 2, and c c = ( 2 ℵ 0 ) c = 2 c × ℵ 0 = 2 c ,...
- The grapheme Ć (minuscule: ć), formed from C with the addition of an acute accent, is used in various languages. It usually denotes [t͡ɕ], the voiceless...
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