Definition of Solar microscope. Meaning of Solar microscope. Synonyms of Solar microscope

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Solar microscope. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Solar microscope and, of course, Solar microscope synonyms and on the right images related to the word Solar microscope.

Definition of Solar microscope

Solar microscope
Microscope Mi"cro*scope, n. [Micro- + -scope.] An optical instrument, consisting of a lens, or combination of lenses, for making an enlarged image of an object which is too minute to be viewed by the naked eye. Compound microscope, an instrument consisting of a combination of lenses such that the image formed by the lens or set of lenses nearest the object (called the objective) is magnified by another lens called the ocular or eyepiece. Oxyhydrogen microscope, and Solar microscope. See under Oxyhydrogen, and Solar. Simple, or Single, microscope, a single convex lens used to magnify objects placed in its focus.
Solar microscope
Solar So"lar, a. [L. solaris, fr. sol the sun; akin to As. s[=o]l, Icel. s[=o]l, Goth. sauil, Lith. saule, W. haul,. sul, Skr. svar, perhaps to E. sun:F. solaire. Cf. Parasol. Sun.] 1. Of or pertaining to the sun; proceeding from the sun; as, the solar system; solar light; solar rays; solar influence. See Solar system, below. 2. (Astrol.) Born under the predominant influence of the sun. [Obs.] And proud beside, as solar people are. --Dryden. 3. Measured by the progress or revolution of the sun in the ecliptic; as, the solar year. 4. Produced by the action of the sun, or peculiarly affected by its influence. They denominate some herbs solar, and some lunar. --Bacon. Solar cycle. See under Cycle. Solar day. See Day, 2. Solar engine, an engine in which the energy of solar heat is used to produce motion, as in evaporating water for a steam engine, or expanding air for an air engine. Solar flowers (Bot.), flowers which open and shut daily at certain hours. Solar lamp, an argand lamp. Solar microscope, a microscope consisting essentially, first, of a mirror for reflecting a beam of sunlight through the tube, which sometimes is fixed in a window shutter; secondly, of a condenser, or large lens, for converging the beam upon the object; and, thirdly, of a small lens, or magnifier, for throwing an enlarged image of the object at its focus upon a screen in a dark room or in a darkened box.

Meaning of Solar microscope from wikipedia

- article: Solar camera Known equally, though later, as a solar enlarger, the solar camera is a photographic application of the solar microscope and an ancestor...
- delineate the produced figures of the kaleidoscope by means of the solar microscope (a type of camera obscura device), magic lantern or camera lucida....
- Texas conman. Gustavus Katterfelto, a Prussian conjurer who used a solar microscope which he claimed could detect disease. Ivar Kreuger, the Swedish "Match...
- of microscopes are the fluorescence microscope, electron microscope (both the transmission electron microscope and the scanning electron microscope) and...
- An electron microscope is a microscope that uses a beam of accelerated electrons as a source of illumination. As the wavelength of an electron can be up...
- crystal. Another photomicrograph shows insect wings as seen in the "solar microscope" he and others developed for projecting images onto a large screen...
- woody fibres of leaves and the wings of insects". He also found that solar microscope images of small objects were easily captured on prepared paper. Davy...
- He recorded that "images of small objects, produced by means of the solar microscope, may be copied without difficulty on prepared paper." Josef Maria Eder...
- June 2019. "About the SDO Mission" Solar Dynamics Observatory. Retrieved: 15 July 2013. "****an launches Sun 'microscope'". BBC. 2006-09-23. Retrieved 2009-05-19...
- photographic enlargement to Humphry Davy who realised the idea of using a solar microscope to project images onto sensitised paper. In June 1802 Davy published...