Definition of Seismic. Meaning of Seismic. Synonyms of Seismic

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Seismic. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Seismic and, of course, Seismic synonyms and on the right images related to the word Seismic.

Definition of Seismic

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Anaseismic
Anaseismic An`a*seis"mic, a. [Cf. Gr. ? a shaking up and down.] Moving up and down; -- said of earthquake shocks.
Microseismic
Microseism Mi"cro*seism, n. [Micro- + Gr. ? an earthquake, fr. ? to shake.] A feeble earth tremor not directly perceptible, but detected only by means of specially constructed apparatus. -- Mi`cro*seis"mic, *seis"mic*al, a.
seismical
Microseism Mi"cro*seism, n. [Micro- + Gr. ? an earthquake, fr. ? to shake.] A feeble earth tremor not directly perceptible, but detected only by means of specially constructed apparatus. -- Mi`cro*seis"mic, *seis"mic*al, a.
Teleseismic
Teleseism Tel"e*seism, n. [Gr. th^le far + ? shock.] A seismic movement or shock far from the recording instrument. -- Tel`e*seis"mic, a.

Meaning of Seismic from wikipedia

- of earthquake environmental effects such as tsunamis as well as diverse seismic sources such as volcanic, tectonic, oceanic, atmospheric, and artificial...
- from the sudden release of energy in the Earth's lithosphere that creates seismic waves. Earthquakes can range in size from those that are so weak that they...
- reflected seismic waves. The method requires a controlled seismic source of energy, such as dynamite or Tovex blast, a specialized air gun or a seismic vibrator...
- Seismic waves are waves of energy that travel through the Earth's layers, and are a result of earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, magma movement, large landslides...
- Seismic magnitude scales are used to describe the overall strength or "size" of an earthquake. These are distinguished from seismic intensity scales that...
- interchangeably. The term seismic sea wave also is used to refer to the phenomenon, because the waves most often are generated by seismic activity such as earthquakes...
- region's seismic activity. The term was coined by Beno Gutenberg and Charles Francis Richter in 1941. Seismicity is studied by geophysicists. Seismicity is...
- / 36.58; -89.59 The New Madrid Seismic Zone (/ˈmædrɪd/), sometimes called the New Madrid Fault Line, is a major seismic zone and a prolific source of intraplate...
- fault ruptures and the ac****ulated strain energy is released in part as seismic waves, forming an earthquake. Strain occurs ac****ulatively or instantaneously...
- A seismic gap is a segment of an active fault known to produce significant earthquakes that has not slipped in an unusually long time, compared with other...
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