Definition of Overlaying. Meaning of Overlaying. Synonyms of Overlaying

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Overlaying. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Overlaying and, of course, Overlaying synonyms and on the right images related to the word Overlaying.

Definition of Overlaying

Overlaying
Overlaying O"ver*lay"ing, n. A superficial covering; a coating.

Meaning of Overlaying from wikipedia

- Overlaying or overlying is the act of accidentally smothering a child to death by rolling over them in sleep. Alleged instances of overlaying were perceived...
- Overlay may refer to: Overlay architecture, "event architecture" relating to the temporary elements that supplement existing buildings and infrastructure...
- An overlay network is a computer network that is layered on top of another network. Nodes in the overlay network can be thought of as being connected...
- In poker, an overlay is the gap between a poker tournament's guaranteed prize pool and the actual prize pool generated by entrants. For example, if a...
- overlaying means "the process of transferring a block of program code or other data into main memory, replacing what is already stored". Overlaying is...
- Video overlay is any technique used to display a video window on a computer display while byp****ing the chain of CPU to graphics card to computer monitor...
- This technique is also referred to as colour keying, colour-separation overlay (CSO; primarily by the BBC), or by various terms for specific colour-related...
- In computing, OverlayFS is a union mount filesystem implementation for Linux. It combines multiple different underlying mount points into one, resulting...
- telecommunications, an overlay plan is a telephone numbering plan that ****igns multiple area codes to a geographic numbering plan area (NPA). Overlaying numbering...
- An overlayer is a layer of adatoms adsorbed onto a surface, for instance onto the surface of a single crystal. Adsorbed species on single crystal surfaces...