Definition of Outcry. Meaning of Outcry. Synonyms of Outcry

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Outcry. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Outcry and, of course, Outcry synonyms and on the right images related to the word Outcry.

Definition of Outcry

Outcry
Outcry Out"cry`, n. 1. A vehement or loud cry; a cry of distress, alarm, opposition, or detestation; clamor. 2. Sale at public auction. --Massinger. Thackeray.

Meaning of Outcry from wikipedia

- Outcry usually refers to a loud cry or a large protest, specifically it can refer to: Outcry (video game), a first person psychological thriller point-and-click...
- Open outcry is a method of communication between professionals on a stock exchange or ****ures exchange typically on a trading floor. It involves shouting...
- A protest (also called a demonstration, remonstration or remonstrance) is a public expression of objection, disapproval or dissent towards an idea or course...
- Outcry (known as Outcry: The Dawn in Europe) is a first person psychological thriller point-and-click adventure video game developed by Phantomery Interactive...
- world's strongmen". The Globe and Mail. Huet, Natalie (March 22, 2019). "Outcry as Trump backs Israeli sovereignty over Golan Heights". Euronews. Reuters...
- ‹ The template Infobox book is being considered for merging. › The Outcry is a novel by Henry James published in 1911. It was originally conceived as a...
- The Outcry 2016 Summer Tour is an annual Christian tour aimed at uniting the Christian church. The 2016 edition features recording artists Hillsong Worship...
- videos" and "Discussion forums across the Internet are already bursting with outcry against the new comment system". In the same article Melvin goes on to say:...
- In United States law, an outcry witness is the person who first hears an allegation of abuse made by a child or another victim of abuse or ****ual crime...
- to ****imilate Islam into the state rather than eliminate it when public outcry became too disruptive. After the "Toleration of All Faiths" Edict of 1773...
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