Definition of Ounce. Meaning of Ounce. Synonyms of Ounce

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Definition of Ounce

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Abrenounce
Abrenounce Ab`re*nounce", v. t. [L. abrenuntiare; ab + renuntiare. See Renounce.] To renounce. [Obs.] ``They abrenounce and cast them off.' --Latimer.
Announcement
Announcement An*nounce"ment, n. The act of announcing, or giving notice; that which announces; proclamation; publication.
Announcer
Announcer An*noun"cer, n. One who announces.
Bounce
Bounce Bounce, v. t. 1. To drive against anything suddenly and violently; to bump; to thump. --Swift. 2. To cause to bound or rebound; sometimes, to toss. 3. To eject violently, as from a room; to discharge unceremoniously, as from employment. [Collog. U. S.] 4. To bully; to scold. [Collog.] --J. Fletcher.
Bounce
Bounce Bounce, n. 1. A sudden leap or bound; a rebound. 2. A heavy, sudden, and often noisy, blow or thump. The bounce burst open the door. --Dryden. 3. An explosion, or the noise of one. [Obs.] 4. Bluster; brag; untruthful boasting; audacious exaggeration; an impudent lie; a bouncer. --Johnson. De Quincey.? 5. (Zo["o]l.) A dogfish of Europe (Scyllium catulus).
Bounce
Bounce Bounce, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Bounced; p. pr. & vb. n. Bouncing.] [OE. bunsen; cf. D. bonzen to strike, bounce, bons blow, LG. bunsen to knock; all prob. of imitative origin.] 1. To strike or thump, so as to rebound, or to make a sudden noise; a knock loudly. Another bounces as hard as he can knock. --Swift. Against his bosom bounced his heaving heart. --Dryden. 2. To leap or spring suddenly or unceremoniously; to bound; as, she bounced into the room. Out bounced the mastiff. --Swift. Bounced off his arm+chair. --Thackeray. 3. To boast; to talk big; to bluster. [Obs.]
Bounce
Bounce Bounce, adv. With a sudden leap; suddenly. This impudent puppy comes bounce in upon me. --Bickerstaff.
Bounced
Bounce Bounce, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Bounced; p. pr. & vb. n. Bouncing.] [OE. bunsen; cf. D. bonzen to strike, bounce, bons blow, LG. bunsen to knock; all prob. of imitative origin.] 1. To strike or thump, so as to rebound, or to make a sudden noise; a knock loudly. Another bounces as hard as he can knock. --Swift. Against his bosom bounced his heaving heart. --Dryden. 2. To leap or spring suddenly or unceremoniously; to bound; as, she bounced into the room. Out bounced the mastiff. --Swift. Bounced off his arm+chair. --Thackeray. 3. To boast; to talk big; to bluster. [Obs.]
Bouncer
Bouncer Boun"cer, n. 1. One who bounces; a large, heavy person who makes much noise in moving. 2. A boaster; a bully. [Collog.] --Johnson. 3. A bold lie; also, a liar. [Collog.] --Marryat. 4. Something big; a good stout example of the kind. The stone must be a bouncer. --De Quincey.
Denouncement
Denouncement De*nounce"ment, n. [Cf. OF. denoncement.] Solemn, official, or menacing announcement; denunciation. [Archaic] False is the reply of Cain, upon the denouncement of his curse. --Sir T. Browne.
Denouncer
Denouncer De*noun"cer . One who denounces, or declares, as a menace. Here comes the sad denouncer of my fate. --Dryden.
Enouncement
Enouncement E*nounce"ment, n. Act of enouncing; that which is enounced.
Flounce
Flounce Flounce, n. The act of floucing; a sudden, jerking motion of the body.
Flounce
Flounce Flounce, v. t. To deck with a flounce or flounces; as, to flounce a petticoat or a frock.
Fluidounce
Fluidounce Flu"id*ounce`, n. See Fluid ounce, under Fluid.
Frounce
Frounce Frounce, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Frounced; p. pr. & vb. n. Frouncing.] [OE. frouncen, fronsen, to told, wrinkle, OF. froncier, F. froncer, perh. fr. an assumed LL. frontiare to wrinkle the forehead, L. frons forehead. See Front, and cf. Flounce part of a dress.] To gather into or adorn with plaits, as a dress; to form wrinkles in or upon; to curl or frizzle, as the hair. Not tricked and frounced, as she was wont. --Milton.
Frounce
Frounce Frounce, v. i. To form wrinkles in the forehead; to manifest displeasure; to frown. [Obs.] The Commons frounced and stormed. -- Holland.
Frounced
Frounce Frounce, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Frounced; p. pr. & vb. n. Frouncing.] [OE. frouncen, fronsen, to told, wrinkle, OF. froncier, F. froncer, perh. fr. an assumed LL. frontiare to wrinkle the forehead, L. frons forehead. See Front, and cf. Flounce part of a dress.] To gather into or adorn with plaits, as a dress; to form wrinkles in or upon; to curl or frizzle, as the hair. Not tricked and frounced, as she was wont. --Milton.
Frounceless
Frounceless Frounce"less, a. Without frounces. --Rom. of R.
Jounce
Jounce Jounce, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. Jounced; p. pr. & vb. n. Jouncing.] [Cf. Jaunce.] To jolt; to shake, especially by rough riding or by driving over obstructions.
Jounce
Jounce Jounce, n. A jolt; a shake; a hard trot.
Jounced
Jounce Jounce, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. Jounced; p. pr. & vb. n. Jouncing.] [Cf. Jaunce.] To jolt; to shake, especially by rough riding or by driving over obstructions.
Mispronounce
Mispronounce Mis`pro*nounce", v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. Mispronounced; p. pr. & vb. n. Mispronouncing.] To pronounce incorrectly.
Mispronounced
Mispronounce Mis`pro*nounce", v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. Mispronounced; p. pr. & vb. n. Mispronouncing.] To pronounce incorrectly.
Pounce
Pounce Pounce, v. i. To fall suddenly and seize with the claws; -- with on or upon; as, a hawk pounces upon a chicken. Also used figuratively. Derision is never so agonizing as when it pounces on the wanderings of misguided sensibility. --Jeffrey.
Pounce
Pounce Pounce, n. [F. ponce pumice, pounce, fr. L. pumex, -icis, pumice. See Pumice.] 1. A fine powder, as of sandarac, or cuttlefish bone, -- formerly used to prevent ink from spreading on manuscript.
Pounce
Pounce Pounce, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Pounded; p. pr. & vb. n. Pouncing.] To sprinkle or rub with pounce; as, to pounce paper, or a pattern.
Pounce
Pounce Pounce, n. [Prob. through French, from an assumed LL. punctiare to prick, L. pungere, punctum. See Puncheon, Punch, v. t.] 1. The claw or talon of a bird of prey. --Spenser. Burke. 2. A punch or stamp. [Obs.] ``A pounce to print money with.' --Withals. 3. Cloth worked in eyelet holes. [Obs.] --Homilies.
Pounce box
2. Charcoal dust, or some other colored powder for making patterns through perforated designs, -- used by embroiderers, lace makers, etc. Pounce box, a box for sprinkling pounce. Pounce paper, a transparent paper for tracing.
Pounce paper
2. Charcoal dust, or some other colored powder for making patterns through perforated designs, -- used by embroiderers, lace makers, etc. Pounce box, a box for sprinkling pounce. Pounce paper, a transparent paper for tracing.

Meaning of Ounce from wikipedia

- The ounce (abbreviated oz; apothecary symbol: ℥) is a unit of m****, weight, or volume used in most British derived customary systems of measurement. The...
- A fluid ounce (abbreviated fl oz, fl. oz. or oz. fl., old forms ℥, fl ℥, f℥, ƒ ℥) is a unit of volume (also called capacity) typically used for measuring...
- units are the grain, pennyweight (24 grains), troy ounce (20 pennyweights), and troy pound (12 troy ounces). The grain is the same grain used in the more...
- An ounce is any of several units of m**** Ounce may also be: Ounce-force, a unit of force, one sixteenth of a pound-force Fluid ounce, any of several units...
- ounce as ​ 1⁄6, ​1⁄2, and 8 fluid ounces. The fluid ounce derives its name originally from being the volume of one ounce avoirdupois of water, but in the...
- In the American vernacular, a forty-ounce or simply forty is a gl**** or plastic bottle that holds 40 fluid ounces (1.18 liters, or 2.5 U.S. pints) of...
- The snow leopard (Panthera uncia), also known as the ounce, is a large cat native to the mountain ranges of Central and South Asia. It is listed as Vulnerable...
- 400-troy-ounce (12.4-kilogram; 438.9-ounce) Good Delivery gold bar. The kilobar, which is 1,000 grams (32.15 troy ounces) in m****, and a 100 troy ounce gold...
- Frank Oz (born Frank Richard Oznowicz; 25 May 1944) is an American actor, puppeteer, director and producer. He began his career as a puppeteer, performing...
- and grain being exactly the same in both. It divides a pound into 12 ounces, an ounce into 8 drachms, and a drachm into 3 scruples or 60 grains. This exact...
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