Definition of Orphrey. Meaning of Orphrey. Synonyms of Orphrey

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Orphrey. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Orphrey and, of course, Orphrey synonyms and on the right images related to the word Orphrey.

Definition of Orphrey

Orphrey
Orphrey Or"phrey, n. [See Orfrays.] A band of rich embroidery, wholly or in part of gold, affixed to vestments, especially those of ecclesiastics. --Pugin.

Meaning of Orphrey from wikipedia

- An orphrey, also spelt orfrey or orfray, is a form of often highly detailed embroidery, in which typically simple materials are made into complex patterns...
- a round badge (possibly a rose) on the left shoulder. The cope has an orphrey. This has been supposed to represent a Canon of Windsor. Section 9 of the...
- the wrists, and decorated with relatively simple symbols or bands and orphreys. By comparison, "fiddleback" vestments were often extremely heavily embroidered...
- Embellishment is commonly by means of decorative bands of material called orphreys, embroidery (sometimes in gold or silver thread, or making use of pearls...
- wood-carvings and fragments of chancel screens, metal artifacts, and orphrey, the largest category being the icons, some of which bear the clear hallmarks...
- embroidery pieces were often made as vestments, such as copes, chasubles and orphreys, or else as antependia, shrine covers or other church furnishings. Secular...
- head a thistle; their coat was of sky-blue damask, with gold embroidered orphreys representing the collar, lined with red satin. The Grand Collar of the...
- the lady chapel Venerable Bede by Harry Clarke 15th century, medieval orphrey on a chasuble in active use at St. Cuthbert's. Durham University Dominican...
- in 1246, and in 1247 three silver chalices, a censer, and quantities of orphrey, samite and other precious cloths for making chasubles and dalmatics for...
- III gave the house a gift of £10 to buy a chasuble "of red samite with Orphreys". St. Thomas near Stafford continued to grow during the late Middle Ages...
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