Definition of Nigra. Meaning of Nigra. Synonyms of Nigra

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Definition of Nigra

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Ballota nigra
Horehound Hore"hound`, n. [OE. horehune, AS. h[=a]rhune; h[=a]r hoar, gray + hune horehound; cf. L. cunila a species of organum, Gr. ?, Skr. kn?y to smell.] (Bot.) A plant of the genus Marrubium (M. vulgare), which has a bitter taste, and is a weak tonic, used as a household remedy for colds, coughing, etc. [Written also hoarhound.] Fetid horehound, or Black horehound, a disagreeable plant resembling horehound (Ballota nigra). Water horehound, a species of the genus Lycopus, resembling mint, but not aromatic.
Brassica nigra
Sinigrin Sin"i*grin, n. [From NL. Sinapis nigra.] (Chem.) A glucoside found in the seeds of black mustard (Brassica nigra, formerly Sinapis nigra) It resembles sinalbin, and consists of a potassium salt of myronic acid.
Centaurea nigra
Ironheads I"ron*heads`, n. (Bot.) A European composite herb (Centaurea nigra); -- so called from the resemblance of its knobbed head to an iron ball fixed on a long handle. --Dr. Prior.
Centaurea nigra
Knapweed Knap"weed`, n. (Bot.) The black centaury (Centaurea nigra); -- so called from the knoblike heads of flowers. Called also bullweed.
Centaurea nigra
Matfelon Mat"fel*on, n. [W. madfelen.] (Bot.) The knapweed (Centaurea nigra).
Dalbergia nigra
Rosewood Rose"wood, n. A valuable cabinet wood of a dark red color, streaked and variegated with black, obtained from several tropical leguminous trees of the genera Dalbergia and Mach[ae]rium. The finest kind is from Brazil, and is said to be from the Dalbergia nigra. African rosewood, the wood of the leguminous tree Pterocarpus erinaceus. Jamaica rosewood, the wood of two West Indian trees (Amyris balsamifera, and Linocieria ligustrina). New South Wales rosewood, the wood of Trichilia glandulosa, a tree related to the margosa.
Denigrate
Denigrate Den"i*grate, v. t. [L. denigrare; de- + nigrare to blacken, niger black.] 1. To blacken thoroughly; to make very black. --Boyle. 2. Fig.: To blacken or sully; to defame. [R.] To denigrate the memory of Voltaire. --Morley.
Denigration
Denigration Den`i*gra"tion, n. [L. denigratio.] 1. The act of making black. --Boyle. 2. Fig.: A blackening; defamation. The vigorous denigration of science. --Morley.
Denigrator
Denigrator Den"i*gra`tor, n. One who, or that which, blackens.
Dipholis nigra
Bully tree Bul"ly tree` (Bot.) The name of several West Indian trees of the order Sapotace[ae], as Dipholis nigra and species of Sapota and Mimusops. Most of them yield a substance closely resembling gutta-percha.
J nigra
Note: In some parts of America, especially in New England, the name walnut is given to several species of hickory (Carya), and their fruit. Ash-leaved walnut, a tree (Juglans fraxinifolia), native in Transcaucasia. Black walnut, a North American tree (J. nigra) valuable for its purplish brown wood, which is extensively used in cabinetwork and for gunstocks. The nuts are thick-shelled, and nearly globular. English, or European, walnut, a tree (J. regia), native of Asia from the Caucasus to Japan, valuable for its timber and for its excellent nuts, which are also called Madeira nuts. Walnut brown, a deep warm brown color, like that of the heartwood of the black walnut. Walnut oil, oil extracted from walnut meats. It is used in cooking, making soap, etc. White walnut, a North American tree (J. cinerea), bearing long, oval, thick-shelled, oily nuts, commonly called butternuts. See Butternut.
Marconigram
Marconigram Mar*co"ni*gram, n. [Marconi + -gram.] A Marconi wireless message.
Marconigraph
Marconigraph Mar*co"ni*graph, n. [Marconi + -graph.] The apparatus used in Marconi wireless telegraphy.
Morus nigra
Morus Mo"rus, n. [L., mulberry tree. See Mulberry.] (Bot.) A genus of trees, some species of which produce edible fruit; the mulberry. See Mulberry. Note: Morus alba is the white mulberry, a native of India or China, the leaves of which are extensively used for feeding silkworms, for which it furnishes the chief food. Morus multicaulis, the many-stemmed or Chinese mulberry, is only a form of white mulberry, preferred on account of its more abundant leaves. Morus nigra, the black mulberry, produces a dark-colored fruit, of an agreeable flavor.
Nigraniline
Nigraniline Ni*gran"i*line (? or ?), n. [L. niger black + E. aniline.] (Chem.) The complex, nitrogenous, organic base and dyestuff called also aniline black.
Oidemia nigra
Scoter Sco"ter, n. [Cf. Prov. E. scote to plow up.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of northern sea ducks of the genus Oidemia. Note: The European scoters are Oidemia nigra, called also black duck, black diver, surf duck; and the velvet, or double, scoter (O. fusca). The common American species are the velvet, or white-winged, scoter (O. Deglandi), called also velvet duck, white-wing, bull coot, white-winged coot; the black scoter (O. Americana), called also black coot, butterbill, coppernose; and the surf scoter, or surf duck (O. perspicillata), called also baldpate, skunkhead, horsehead, patchhead, pishaug, and spectacled coot. These birds are collectively called also coots. The females and young are called gray coots, and brown coots.
Omnigraph
Omnigraph Om"ni*graph, n. [Omni- + -graph.] A pantograph. [R.]
P nigra
Spruce Spruce, n. [OE. Spruce or Pruse, Prussia, Prussian. So named because it was first known as a native of Prussia, or because its sprouts were used for making, spruce beer. Cf. Spruce beer, below, Spruce, a.] 1. (Bot.) Any coniferous tree of the genus Picea, as the Norway spruce (P. excelsa), and the white and black spruces of America (P. alba and P. nigra), besides several others in the far Northwest. See Picea. 2. The wood or timber of the spruce tree. 3. Prussia leather; pruce. [Obs.] Spruce, a sort of leather corruptly so called for Prussia leather. --E. Phillips. Douglas spruce (Bot.), a valuable timber tree (Pseudotsuga Douglasii) of Northwestern America. Essence of spruce, a thick, dark-colored, bitterish, and acidulous liquid made by evaporating a decoction of the young branches of spruce. Hemlock spruce (Bot.), a graceful coniferous tree (Tsuga Canadensis) of North America. Its timber is valuable, and the bark is largely used in tanning leather. Spruce beer. [G. sprossenbier; sprosse sprout, shoot (akin to E. sprout, n.) + bier beer. The word was changed into spruce because the beer came from Prussia (OE. Spruce), or because it was made from the sprouts of the spruce. See Sprout, n., Beer, and cf. Spruce, n.] A kind of beer which is tinctured or flavored with spruce, either by means of the extract or by decoction. Spruce grouse. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Spruce partridge, below. Spruce leather. See Spruce, n., 3. Spruce partridge (Zo["o]l.), a handsome American grouse (Dendragapus Canadensis) found in Canada and the Northern United States; -- called also Canada grouse.
Pinnigrada
Pinnigrada Pin`ni*gra"da, n. pl. [NL., fr. pinna a feather + gradi to walk, move.] (Zo["o]l.) Same as Pinnipedia.
Pinnigrade
Pinnigrade Pin"ni*grade, n. (Zo["o]l.) An animal of the seal tribe, moving by short feet that serve as paddles.
Q nigra
Oak Oak ([=o]k), n. [OE. oke, ok, ak, AS. [=a]c; akin to D. eik, G. eiche, OHG. eih, Icel. eik, Sw. ek, Dan. eeg.] 1. (Bot.) Any tree or shrub of the genus Quercus. The oaks have alternate leaves, often variously lobed, and staminate flowers in catkins. The fruit is a smooth nut, called an acorn, which is more or less inclosed in a scaly involucre called the cup or cupule. There are now recognized about three hundred species, of which nearly fifty occur in the United States, the rest in Europe, Asia, and the other parts of North America, a very few barely reaching the northern parts of South America and Africa. Many of the oaks form forest trees of grand proportions and live many centuries. The wood is usually hard and tough, and provided with conspicuous medullary rays, forming the silver grain. 2. The strong wood or timber of the oak. Note: Among the true oaks in America are: Barren oak, or Black-jack, Q. nigra. Basket oak, Q. Michauxii. Black oak, Q. tinctoria; -- called also yellow or quercitron oak. Bur oak (see under Bur.), Q. macrocarpa; -- called also over-cup or mossy-cup oak. Chestnut oak, Q. Prinus and Q. densiflora. Chinquapin oak (see under Chinquapin), Q. prinoides. Coast live oak, Q. agrifolia, of California; -- also called enceno. Live oak (see under Live), Q. virens, the best of all for shipbuilding; also, Q. Chrysolepis, of California. Pin oak. Same as Swamp oak. Post oak, Q. obtusifolia. Red oak, Q. rubra. Scarlet oak, Q. coccinea. Scrub oak, Q. ilicifolia, Q. undulata, etc. Shingle oak, Q. imbricaria. Spanish oak, Q. falcata. Swamp Spanish oak, or Pin oak, Q. palustris. Swamp white oak, Q. bicolor. Water oak, Q. aguatica. Water white oak, Q. lyrata. Willow oak, Q. Phellos. Among the true oaks in Europe are: Bitter oak, or Turkey oak, Q. Cerris (see Cerris). Cork oak, Q. Suber. English white oak, Q. Robur. Evergreen oak, Holly oak, or Holm oak, Q. Ilex. Kermes oak, Q. coccifera. Nutgall oak, Q. infectoria. Note: Among plants called oak, but not of the genus Quercus, are: African oak, a valuable timber tree (Oldfieldia Africana). Australian, or She, oak, any tree of the genus Casuarina (see Casuarina). Indian oak, the teak tree (see Teak). Jerusalem oak. See under Jerusalem. New Zealand oak, a sapindaceous tree (Alectryon excelsum). Poison oak, the poison ivy. See under Poison.
Quercus nigra
Black-jack Black"-jack`, n. 1. (Min.) A name given by English miners to sphalerite, or zinc blende; -- called also false galena. See Blende. 2. Caramel or burnt sugar, used to color wines, spirits, ground coffee, etc. 3. A large leather vessel for beer, etc. [Obs.] 4. (Bot.) The Quercus nigra, or barren oak. 5. The ensign of a pirate.
R nigra
Skimmer Skim"mer, n. 1. One who, or that which, skims; esp., a utensil with which liquids are skimmed. 2. (Zo["o]l.) Any species of longwinged marine birds of the genus Rhynchops, allied to the terns, but having the lower mandible compressed and much longer than the upper one. These birds fly rapidly along the surface of the water, with the lower mandible immersed, thus skimming out small fishes. The American species (R. nigra) is common on the southern coasts of the United States. Called also scissorbill, and shearbill. 3. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several large bivalve shells, sometimes used for skimming milk, as the sea clams, and large scallops.
S nigra
Elder El"der, n. [OE. ellern, eller, AS. ellen, cf. LG. elloorn; perh. akin to OHG. holantar, holuntar, G. holunder; or perh. to E. alder, n.] (Bot.) A genus of shrubs (Sambucus) having broad umbels of white flowers, and small black or red berries. Note: The common North American species is Sambucus Canadensis; the common European species (S. nigra) forms a small tree. The red-berried elder is S. pubens. The berries are diaphoretic and aperient. Box elder. See under 1st Box. Dwarf elder. See Danewort. Elder tree. (Bot.) Same as Elder. --Shak. Marsh elder, the cranberry tree Viburnum Opulus).
Sambucus nigra
Elderberry El"der*ber`ry, n. (Bot.) The berrylike drupe of the elder. That of the Old World elder (Sambucus nigra) and that of the American sweet elder (S. Canadensis) are sweetish acid, and are eaten as a berry or made into wine.
Sinapis nigra
Sinigrin Sin"i*grin, n. [From NL. Sinapis nigra.] (Chem.) A glucoside found in the seeds of black mustard (Brassica nigra, formerly Sinapis nigra) It resembles sinalbin, and consists of a potassium salt of myronic acid.

Meaning of Nigra from wikipedia

- Nigra may refer to: Castelnuovo Nigra, a comune (muni****lity) in the Province of Turin in the Italian region Piedmont Porta Nigra, a large Roman city...
- substantia nigra (SN) is a basal ganglia structure located in the midbrain that plays an important role in reward and movement. Substantia nigra is Latin...
- Linea nigra (Latin for "black line"), often referred to as a pregnancy line, is a linear hyperpigmentation that commonly appears on the abdomen. The brownish...
- Sambucus nigra is a species complex of flowering plants in the family Adoxaceae native to most of Europe and North America. Common names include elder...
- Pinus nigra, the Austrian pine or black pine, is a moderately variable species of pine, occurring across southern Mediterranean Europe from the Iberian...
- Galápagos tortoise complex or Galápagos giant tortoise complex (Chelonoidis nigra and related species) are the largest living species of tortoise. Modern...
- Juglans nigra, the eastern American black walnut, is a species of deciduous tree in the walnut family, Juglandaceae, native to North America. It grows...
- olfactory tubercle), the globus pallidus, the ventral pallidum, the substantia nigra, and the subthalamic nucleus. Each of these components has a complex internal...
- The Porta Nigra (Latin for black gate) is a large Roman city gate in Trier, Germany. It is today the largest Roman city gate north of the Alps. It is...
- Betula nigra, the black birch, river birch or water birch, is a species of birch native to the Eastern United States from New Hampshire west to southern...
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