Definition of Mande. Meaning of Mande. Synonyms of Mande

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Definition of Mande

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Allemande
Allemande Al"le*mande", n. [F., fr. allemand German.] 1. (Mus.) A dance in moderate twofold time, invented by the French in the reign of Louis XIV.; -- now mostly found in suites of pieces, like those of Bach and Handel. 2. A figure in dancing.
C Coromandelica
Quail Quail, n. [OF. quaille, F. caille, LL. quaquila, qualia, qualea, of Dutch or German origin; cf. D. kwakkel, kwartel, OHG. wahtala, G. wachtel.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) Any gallinaceous bird belonging to Coturnix and several allied genera of the Old World, especially the common European quail (C. communis), the rain quail (C. Coromandelica) of India, the stubble quail (C. pectoralis), and the Australian swamp quail (Synoicus australis). 2. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several American partridges belonging to Colinus, Callipepla, and allied genera, especially the bobwhite (called Virginia quail, and Maryland quail), and the California quail (Calipepla Californica). 3. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of Turnix and allied genera, native of the Old World, as the Australian painted quail (Turnix varius). See Turnix. 4. A prostitute; -- so called because the quail was thought to be a very amorous bird.[Obs.] --Shak. Bustard quail (Zo["o]l.), a small Asiatic quail-like bird of the genus Turnix, as T. taigoor, a black-breasted species, and the hill bustard quail (T. ocellatus). See Turnix. Button quail (Zo["o]l.), one of several small Asiatic species of Turnix, as T. Sykesii, which is said to be the smallest game bird of India. Mountain quail. See under Mountain. Quail call, a call or pipe for alluring quails into a net or within range. Quail dove (Zo["o]l.), any one of several American ground pigeons belonging to Geotrygon and allied genera. Quail hawk (Zo["o]l.), the New Zealand sparrow hawk (Hieracidea Nov[ae]-Hollandi[ae]). Quail pipe. See Quail call, above. Quail snipe (Zo["o]l.), the dowitcher, or red-breasted snipe; -- called also robin snipe, and brown snipe. Sea quail (Zo["o]l.), the turnstone. [Local, U. S.]
Calamander wood
Calamander wood Cal"a*man`der wood (k[a^]l"[.a]*m[a^]n`d[~e]r w[oo^]d`). A valuable furniture wood from India and Ceylon, of a hazel-brown color, with black stripes, very hard in texture. It is a species of ebony, and is obtained from the Diospyros qu[ae]sita. Called also Coromandel wood.
Commandeer
Commandeer Com`man*deer", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Commandeered; p. pr. & vb. n. Commandeering.] [D. kommandeeren to command, in South Africa to commandeer, fr. F. commander to command. See Command.] 1. (Mil.) To compel to perform military service; to seize for military purposes; -- orig. used of the Boers. 2. To take arbitrary or forcible possession of. [Colloq.]
Commandeered
Commandeer Com`man*deer", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Commandeered; p. pr. & vb. n. Commandeering.] [D. kommandeeren to command, in South Africa to commandeer, fr. F. commander to command. See Command.] 1. (Mil.) To compel to perform military service; to seize for military purposes; -- orig. used of the Boers. 2. To take arbitrary or forcible possession of. [Colloq.]
Commandeering
Commandeer Com`man*deer", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Commandeered; p. pr. & vb. n. Commandeering.] [D. kommandeeren to command, in South Africa to commandeer, fr. F. commander to command. See Command.] 1. (Mil.) To compel to perform military service; to seize for military purposes; -- orig. used of the Boers. 2. To take arbitrary or forcible possession of. [Colloq.]
Commander
Commander Com*mand"er, n. [Cf. F. commandeur. Cf. Commodore, Commender.] 1. A chief; one who has supreme authority; a leader; the chief officer of an army, or of any division of it. A leader and commander to the people. --Is. lv. 4. 2. (Navy) An officer who ranks next below a captain, -- ranking with a lieutenant colonel in the army. 3. The chief officer of a commandery. 4. A heavy beetle or wooden mallet, used in paving, in sail lofts, etc. Commander in chief, the military title of the officer who has supreme command of the land or naval forces or the united forces of a nation or state; a generalissimo. The President is commander in chief of the army and navy of the United States. Syn: See Chief.
Commander in chief
Commander Com*mand"er, n. [Cf. F. commandeur. Cf. Commodore, Commender.] 1. A chief; one who has supreme authority; a leader; the chief officer of an army, or of any division of it. A leader and commander to the people. --Is. lv. 4. 2. (Navy) An officer who ranks next below a captain, -- ranking with a lieutenant colonel in the army. 3. The chief officer of a commandery. 4. A heavy beetle or wooden mallet, used in paving, in sail lofts, etc. Commander in chief, the military title of the officer who has supreme command of the land or naval forces or the united forces of a nation or state; a generalissimo. The President is commander in chief of the army and navy of the United States. Syn: See Chief.
Commanderies
Commandery Com*mand"er*y, n.; pl. Commanderies. [F. commanderie.] 1. The office or rank of a commander. [Obs.] 2. A district or a manor with lands and tenements appertaining thereto, under the control of a member of an order of knights who was called a commander; -- called also a preceptory. 3. An assembly or lodge of Knights Templars (so called) among the Freemasons. [U. S.] 4. A district under the administration of a military commander or governor. [R.] --Brougham.
Commandership
Commandership Com*mand"er*ship, n. The office of a commander.
Commandery
Commandery Com*mand"er*y, n.; pl. Commanderies. [F. commanderie.] 1. The office or rank of a commander. [Obs.] 2. A district or a manor with lands and tenements appertaining thereto, under the control of a member of an order of knights who was called a commander; -- called also a preceptory. 3. An assembly or lodge of Knights Templars (so called) among the Freemasons. [U. S.] 4. A district under the administration of a military commander or governor. [R.] --Brougham.
Coromandel
Coromandel Cor`o*man"del (k?r`?-m?n"del), n. (Geol.) The west coast, or a portion of the west coast, of the Bay of Bengal. Coromandel gooseberry. See Carambola. Coromandel wood, Calamander wood.
Coromandel gooseberry
Carambola Ca`ram*bo"la, n. (Bot.) An East Indian tree (Averrhoa Carambola), and its acid, juicy fruit; called also Coromandel gooseberry.
Coromandel gooseberry
Gooseberry Goose"ber*ry, n.; pl. Gooseberries, [Corrupted for groseberry or groiseberry, fr. OF. groisele, F. groseille, -- of German origin; cf. G. krausbeere, kr["a]uselbeere (fr. kraus crisp), D. kruisbes, kruisbezie (as if crossberry, fr. kruis cross; for kroesbes, kroesbezie, fr. kroes crisp), Sw. krusb["a]r (fr. krus, krusing, crisp). The first part of the word is perh. akin to E. curl. Cf. Grossular, a.] 1. (Bot.) Any thorny shrub of the genus Ribes; also, the edible berries of such shrub. There are several species, of which Ribes Grossularia is the one commonly cultivated. 2. A silly person; a goose cap. --Goldsmith. Barbadoes gooseberry, a climbing prickly shrub (Pereskia aculeata) of the West Indies, which bears edible berries resembling gooseberries. Coromandel gooseberry. See Carambola. Gooseberry fool. See lst Fool. Gooseberry worm (Zo["o]l.), the larva of a small moth (Dakruma convolutella). It destroys the gooseberry by eating the interior.
Coromandel gooseberry
Coromandel Cor`o*man"del (k?r`?-m?n"del), n. (Geol.) The west coast, or a portion of the west coast, of the Bay of Bengal. Coromandel gooseberry. See Carambola. Coromandel wood, Calamander wood.
Coromandel wood
Calamander wood Cal"a*man`der wood (k[a^]l"[.a]*m[a^]n`d[~e]r w[oo^]d`). A valuable furniture wood from India and Ceylon, of a hazel-brown color, with black stripes, very hard in texture. It is a species of ebony, and is obtained from the Diospyros qu[ae]sita. Called also Coromandel wood.
Coromandel wood
Coromandel Cor`o*man"del (k?r`?-m?n"del), n. (Geol.) The west coast, or a portion of the west coast, of the Bay of Bengal. Coromandel gooseberry. See Carambola. Coromandel wood, Calamander wood.
Countermanded
Countermand Coun`ter*mand" (koun`t[~e]r*m[.a]nd"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Countermanded; p. pr. & vb. n. Countermanding.] [F. contremander; contre (L. contra) + mander to command, fr. L. mandare. Cf. Mandate.] 1. To revoke (a former command); to cancel or rescind by giving an order contrary to one previously given; as, to countermand an order for goods. 2. To prohibit; to forbid. [Obs.] Avicen countermands letting blood in choleric bodles. --Harvey. 3. To oppose; to revoke the command of. For us to alter anything, is to lift ourselves against God; and, as it were, to countermand him. --Hooker.
Demander
Demander De*mand"er, n. One who demands.
Gerrymander
Gerrymander Ger`ry*man"der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Gerrymandered; p. pr. & vb. n. Gerrymandering.] To divide (a State) into districts for the choice of representatives, in an unnatural and unfair way, with a view to give a political party an advantage over its opponent. [Political Cant, U. S.] Note: This was done in Massachusetts at a time when Elbridge Gerry was governor, and was attributed to his influence, hence the name; though it is now known that he was opposed to the measure. --Bartlett.
Gerrymandered
Gerrymander Ger`ry*man"der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Gerrymandered; p. pr. & vb. n. Gerrymandering.] To divide (a State) into districts for the choice of representatives, in an unnatural and unfair way, with a view to give a political party an advantage over its opponent. [Political Cant, U. S.] Note: This was done in Massachusetts at a time when Elbridge Gerry was governor, and was attributed to his influence, hence the name; though it is now known that he was opposed to the measure. --Bartlett.
Gerrymandering
Gerrymander Ger`ry*man"der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Gerrymandered; p. pr. & vb. n. Gerrymandering.] To divide (a State) into districts for the choice of representatives, in an unnatural and unfair way, with a view to give a political party an advantage over its opponent. [Political Cant, U. S.] Note: This was done in Massachusetts at a time when Elbridge Gerry was governor, and was attributed to his influence, hence the name; though it is now known that he was opposed to the measure. --Bartlett.
Giant salamander
Giant Gi"ant, a. Like a giant; extraordinary in size, strength, or power; as, giant brothers; a giant son. Giant cell. (Anat.) See Myeloplax. Giant clam (Zo["o]l.), a bivalve shell of the genus Tridacna, esp. T. gigas, which sometimes weighs 500 pounds. The shells are sometimes used in churches to contain holy water. Giant heron (Zo["o]l.), a very large African heron (Ardeomega goliath). It is the largest heron known. Giant kettle, a pothole of very large dimensions, as found in Norway in connection with glaciers. See Pothole. Giant powder. See Nitroglycerin. Giant puffball (Bot.), a fungus (Lycoperdon giganteum), edible when young, and when dried used for stanching wounds. Giant salamander (Zo["o]l.), a very large aquatic salamander (Megalobatrachus maximus), found in Japan. It is the largest of living Amphibia, becoming a yard long. Giant squid (Zo["o]l.), one of several species of very large squids, belonging to Architeuthis and allied genera. Some are over forty feet long.
Gormander
Gormander Gor"mand*er, n. See Gormand, n. [Obs.]
Lieutenant commander
Lieutenant Lieu*ten"ant (l[-u]*t[e^]n"ant), n. [F., fr. lieu place + tenant holding, p. pr. of tenir to hold, L. tenere. See Lieu, and Tenant, and cf. Locum Tenens.] 1. An officer who supplies the place of a superior in his absence; a representative of, or substitute for, another in the performance of any duty. The lawful magistrate, who is the vicegerent or lieutenant of God. --Abp. Bramhall. 2. (a) A commissioned officer in the army, next below a captain. (b) A commissioned officer in the British navy, in rank next below a commander. (c) A commissioned officer in the United States navy, in rank next below a lieutenant commander. Note: Lieutenant is often used, either adjectively or in hyphened compounds, to denote an officer, in rank next below another, especially when the duties of the higher officer may devolve upon the lower one; as, lieutenant general, or lieutenant-general; lieutenant colonel, or lieutenant-colonel; lieutenant governor, etc. Deputy lieutenant, the title of any one of the deputies or assistants of the lord lieutenant of a county. [Eng.] Lieutenant colonel, an army officer next in rank above major, and below colonel. Lieutenant commander, an officer in the United States navy, in rank next below a commander and next above a lieutenant. Lieutenant general. See in Vocabulary. Lieutenant governor. (a) An officer of a State, being next in rank to the governor, and, in case of the death or resignation of the latter, himself acting as governor. [U. S.] (b) A deputy governor acting as the chief civil officer of one of several colonies under a governor general. [Eng.]
Mandelate
Mandelate Man"del*ate, n. (Chem.) A salt of mandelic acid.
Mandelic
Mandelic Man*del"ic, a. [G. mandel almond.] (Chem.) Pertaining to an acid first obtained from benzoic aldehyde (oil of better almonds), as a white crystalline substance; -- called also phenyl glycolic acid.
Mander
Mander Man"der, v. t. & i. See Maunder.
Manderil
Manderil Man"der*il, n. A mandrel.
manderil
Mandrel Man"drel, n. [F. mandrin, prob. through (assumed) LL. mamphurinum, fr. L. mamphur a bow drill.] (Mach.) (a) A bar of metal inserted in the work to shape it, or to hold it, as in a lathe, during the process of manufacture; an arbor. (b) The live spindle of a turning lathe; the revolving arbor of a circular saw. It is usually driven by a pulley. [Written also manderil.] Mandrel lathe, a lathe with a stout spindle, adapted esp. for chucking, as for forming hollow articles by turning or spinning.

Meaning of Mande from wikipedia

- Mandé is a family of ethnic groups in Western Africa who speak any of the many related Mande languages of the region. Various Mandé groups are found in...
- Mande may refer to: Mandé peoples of western Africa Mande languages Manding, a term covering a subgroup of Mande peoples, and sometimes used for one of...
- Joseph Mande (born March 16, 1983) is an American stand-up comedian, writer and actor. Mande was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico to Louis Mande, a lawyer...
- The Mande languages are spoken in several countries in West Africa by the Mandé peoples and include Maninka, Mandinka, Soninke, Bambara, Kpelle, Dioula...
- ‹ The template Infobox settlement is being considered for merging. › Saint-Mandé (French: [sɛ̃.mɑ̃.de]) is a high-end commune of the Val-de-Marne department...
- Sayouba Mandé (born 15 June 1993) is an Ivorian professional footballer who plays as a goalkeeper for Danish Superliga team OB. Mandé joined Stabæk in...
- established. Other primary branches may include Dogon, Mande, Ijo, Katla and Rashad. The connection of the Mande languages especially has never been demonstrated...
- that of the ancient Mali Empire of the Mandinka (from c. 1230 to c. 1600). Mande people (Bambara, Maninke, Soninke) make up 50% of the country's po****tion...
- The Mandé Variations is a 2008 studio album by Toumani Diabaté, produced by Nick Gold for World Circuit. Unlike many of his recordings which feature large...
- In Indian folklore, the Mande **** is an alleged ape-like creature said to inhabit the Meghalaya subtropical forests in the remote Garo Hills of the...
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