Definition of Magne. Meaning of Magne. Synonyms of Magne

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Magne. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Magne and, of course, Magne synonyms and on the right images related to the word Magne.

Definition of Magne

No result for Magne. Showing similar results...

Animal magnetism
Animal An"i*mal, a. [Cf. F. animal.] 1. Of or relating to animals; as, animal functions. 2. Pertaining to the merely sentient part of a creature, as distinguished from the intellectual, rational, or spiritual part; as, the animal passions or appetites. 3. Consisting of the flesh of animals; as, animal food. Animal magnetism. See Magnetism and Mesmerism. Animal electricity, the electricity developed in some animals, as the electric eel, torpedo, etc. Animal flower (Zo["o]l.), a name given to certain marine animals resembling a flower, as any species of actinia or sea anemone, and other Anthozoa, hydroids, starfishes, etc. Animal heat (Physiol.), the heat generated in the body of a living animal, by means of which the animal is kept at nearly a uniform temperature. Animal spirits. See under Spirit. Animal kingdom, the whole class of beings endowed with animal life. It embraces several subkingdoms, and under these there are Classes, Orders, Families, Genera, Species, and sometimes intermediate groupings, all in regular subordination, but variously arranged by different writers. Note: The following are the grand divisions, or subkingdoms, and the principal classes under them, generally recognized at the present time:
Armed magnet
Armed Armed, a. 1. Furnished with weapons of offense or defense; furnished with the means of security or protection. ``And armed host.' --Dryden. 2. Furnished with whatever serves to add strength, force, or efficiency. A distemper eminently armed from heaven. --De Foe. 3. (Her.) Having horns, beak, talons, etc; -- said of beasts and birds of prey. Armed at all points (Blazoning), completely incased in armor, sometimes described as armed cap-[`a]-pie. --Cussans. Armed en flute. (Naut.) See under Flute. Armed magnet, a magnet provided with an armature. Armed neutrality. See under Neutrality.
artificial magnet
Magnet Mag"net, n. [OE. magnete, OF. magnete, L. magnes, -etis, Gr. ? ? a magnet, metal that looked like silver, prop., Magnesian stone, fr. Gr. ?, a country in Thessaly. Cf. Magnesia, Manganese.] 1. The loadstone; a species of iron ore (the ferrosoferric or magnetic ore, Fe3O4) which has the property of attracting iron and some of its ores, and, when freely suspended, of pointing to the poles; -- called also natural magnet. Dinocrates began to make the arched roof of the temple of Arsino["e] all of magnet, or this loadstone. --Holland. Two magnets, heaven and earth, allure to bliss, The larger loadstone that, the nearer this. --Dryden. 2. (Physics) A bar or mass of steel or iron to which the peculiar properties of the loadstone have been imparted; -- called, in distinction from the loadstone, an artificial magnet. Note: An artificial magnet, produced by the action of a voltaic or electrical battery, is called an electro-magnet. Field magnet (Physics & Elec.), a magnet used for producing and maintaining a magnetic field; -- used especially of the stationary or exciting magnet of a dynamo or electromotor in distinction from that of the moving portion or armature.
Biomagnetic
Biomagnetic Bi`o*mag*net"ic, a. Relating to biomagnetism.
Biomagnetism
Biomagnetism Bi`o*mag"net*ism, n. [Gr. ? life + E. magnetism.] Animal magnetism.
Demagnetization
Demagnetize De*mag"net*ize, v. t. 1. To deprive of magnetic properties. See Magnetize. If the bar be rapidly magnetized and demagnetized. --Am. Cyc. 2. To free from mesmeric influence; to demesmerize. -- De*mag`net*i*za"tion, n. -- De*mag"net*i`zer, n.
Demagnetize
Demagnetize De*mag"net*ize, v. t. 1. To deprive of magnetic properties. See Magnetize. If the bar be rapidly magnetized and demagnetized. --Am. Cyc. 2. To free from mesmeric influence; to demesmerize. -- De*mag`net*i*za"tion, n. -- De*mag"net*i`zer, n.
Demagnetizer
Demagnetize De*mag"net*ize, v. t. 1. To deprive of magnetic properties. See Magnetize. If the bar be rapidly magnetized and demagnetized. --Am. Cyc. 2. To free from mesmeric influence; to demesmerize. -- De*mag`net*i*za"tion, n. -- De*mag"net*i`zer, n.
Diamagnet
Diamagnet Di`a*mag"net, n. [Pref. dia- + magnet.] A body having diamagnetic polarity.
Diamagnetic
Diamagnetic Di`a*mag*net"ic, a. Pertaining to, or exhibiting the phenomena of, diamagnetism; taking, or being of a nature to take, a position at right angles to the lines of magnetic force. See Paramagnetic. Diamagnetic attraction. See under Attraction.
Diamagnetic
Diamagnetic Di`a*mag*net"ic, n. Any substance, as bismuth, glass, phosphorous, etc., which in a field of magnetic force is differently affected from the ordinary magnetic bodies, as iron; that is, which tends to take a position at right angles to the lines of magnetic force, and is repelled by either pole of the magnet.
diamagnetic
Attraction At*trac"tion, n. [L. attractio: cf. F. attraction.] 1. (Physics) An invisible power in a body by which it draws anything to itself; the power in nature acting mutually between bodies or ultimate particles, tending to draw them together, or to produce their cohesion or combination, and conversely resisting separation. Note: Attraction is exerted at both sensible and insensible distances, and is variously denominated according to its qualities or phenomena. Under attraction at sensible distances, there are, -- (1.) Attraction of gravitation, which acts at all distances throughout the universe, with a force proportional directly to the product of the masses of the bodies and inversely to the square of their distances apart. (2.) Magnetic, diamagnetic, and electrical attraction, each of which is limited in its sensible range and is polar in its action, a property dependent on the quality or condition of matter, and not on its quantity. Under attraction at insensible distances, there are, -- (1.) Adhesive attraction, attraction between surfaces of sensible extent, or by the medium of an intervening substance. (2.) Cohesive attraction, attraction between ultimate particles, whether like or unlike, and causing simply an aggregation or a union of those particles, as in the absorption of gases by charcoal, or of oxygen by spongy platinum, or the process of solidification or crystallization. The power in adhesive attraction is strictly the same as that of cohesion. (3.) Capillary attraction, attraction causing a liquid to rise, in capillary tubes or interstices, above its level outside, as in very small glass tubes, or a sponge, or any porous substance, when one end is inserted in the liquid. It is a special case of cohesive attraction. (4.) Chemical attraction, or affinity, that peculiar force which causes elementary atoms, or groups of atoms, to unite to form molecules. 2. The act or property of attracting; the effect of the power or operation of attraction. --Newton. 3. The power or act of alluring, drawing to, inviting, or engaging; an attractive quality; as, the attraction of beauty or eloquence. 4. That which attracts; an attractive object or feature. Syn: Allurement; enticement; charm.
Diamagnetic attraction
Diamagnetic Di`a*mag*net"ic, a. Pertaining to, or exhibiting the phenomena of, diamagnetism; taking, or being of a nature to take, a position at right angles to the lines of magnetic force. See Paramagnetic. Diamagnetic attraction. See under Attraction.
Diamagnetically
Diamagnetically Di`a*mag*net"ic*al*ly, adv. In the manner of, or according to, diamagnetism.
Diamagnetism
Diamagnetism Di`a*mag"net*ism, n. 1. The science which treats of diamagnetic phenomena, and of the properties of diamagnetic bodies. 2. That form or condition of magnetic action which characterizes diamagnetics.
electro-magnet
Magnet Mag"net, n. [OE. magnete, OF. magnete, L. magnes, -etis, Gr. ? ? a magnet, metal that looked like silver, prop., Magnesian stone, fr. Gr. ?, a country in Thessaly. Cf. Magnesia, Manganese.] 1. The loadstone; a species of iron ore (the ferrosoferric or magnetic ore, Fe3O4) which has the property of attracting iron and some of its ores, and, when freely suspended, of pointing to the poles; -- called also natural magnet. Dinocrates began to make the arched roof of the temple of Arsino["e] all of magnet, or this loadstone. --Holland. Two magnets, heaven and earth, allure to bliss, The larger loadstone that, the nearer this. --Dryden. 2. (Physics) A bar or mass of steel or iron to which the peculiar properties of the loadstone have been imparted; -- called, in distinction from the loadstone, an artificial magnet. Note: An artificial magnet, produced by the action of a voltaic or electrical battery, is called an electro-magnet. Field magnet (Physics & Elec.), a magnet used for producing and maintaining a magnetic field; -- used especially of the stationary or exciting magnet of a dynamo or electromotor in distinction from that of the moving portion or armature.
Electro-magnet
Electro-magnet E*lec`tro-mag"net, n. A mass, usually of soft iron, but sometimes of some other magnetic metal, as nickel or cobalt, rendered temporarily magnetic by being placed within a coil of wire through which a current of electricity is passing. The metal is generally in the form of a bar, either straight, or bent into the shape of a horseshoe.
Electro-magnetic
Electro-magnetic E*lec`tro-mag*net"ic, a. Of, Pertaining to, or produced by, magnetism which is developed by the passage of an electric current. Electro-magnetic engine, an engine in which the motive force is electro-magnetism. Electro-magnetic theory of light (Physics), a theory of light which makes it consist in the rapid alternation of transient electric currents moving transversely to the direction of the ray.
Electro-magnetic engine
Electro-magnetic E*lec`tro-mag*net"ic, a. Of, Pertaining to, or produced by, magnetism which is developed by the passage of an electric current. Electro-magnetic engine, an engine in which the motive force is electro-magnetism. Electro-magnetic theory of light (Physics), a theory of light which makes it consist in the rapid alternation of transient electric currents moving transversely to the direction of the ray.
Electro-magnetic theory of light
Electro-magnetic E*lec`tro-mag*net"ic, a. Of, Pertaining to, or produced by, magnetism which is developed by the passage of an electric current. Electro-magnetic engine, an engine in which the motive force is electro-magnetism. Electro-magnetic theory of light (Physics), a theory of light which makes it consist in the rapid alternation of transient electric currents moving transversely to the direction of the ray.
Electro-magnetism
Electro-magnetism E*lec`tro-mag"net*ism, n. The magnetism developed by a current of electricity; the science which treats of the development of magnetism by means of voltaic electricity, and of the properties or actions of the currents evolved.
Field magnet
Magnet Mag"net, n. [OE. magnete, OF. magnete, L. magnes, -etis, Gr. ? ? a magnet, metal that looked like silver, prop., Magnesian stone, fr. Gr. ?, a country in Thessaly. Cf. Magnesia, Manganese.] 1. The loadstone; a species of iron ore (the ferrosoferric or magnetic ore, Fe3O4) which has the property of attracting iron and some of its ores, and, when freely suspended, of pointing to the poles; -- called also natural magnet. Dinocrates began to make the arched roof of the temple of Arsino["e] all of magnet, or this loadstone. --Holland. Two magnets, heaven and earth, allure to bliss, The larger loadstone that, the nearer this. --Dryden. 2. (Physics) A bar or mass of steel or iron to which the peculiar properties of the loadstone have been imparted; -- called, in distinction from the loadstone, an artificial magnet. Note: An artificial magnet, produced by the action of a voltaic or electrical battery, is called an electro-magnet. Field magnet (Physics & Elec.), a magnet used for producing and maintaining a magnetic field; -- used especially of the stationary or exciting magnet of a dynamo or electromotor in distinction from that of the moving portion or armature.
Hydromagnesite
Hydromagnesite Hy`dro*mag"ne*site, n. [Hydro-, 1 + magnesite.] (Min.) A hydrous carbonate of magnesia occurring in white, early, amorphous masses.
Magnes
Magnes Mag"nes, n. [L.] Magnet. [Obs.] --Spenser.
Magnesia
Magnesia Mag*ne"si*a (?; 277), n. [L. Magnesia, fem. of Magnesius of the country Magnesia, Gr. ? ? ? a magnet. Cf. Magnet.] (Chem.) A light earthy white substance, consisting of magnesium oxide, and obtained by heating magnesium hydrate or carbonate, or by burning magnesium. It has a slightly alkaline reaction, and is used in medicine as a mild antacid laxative. See Magnesium. Magnesia alba [L.] (Med. Chem.), a bulky white amorphous substance, consisting of a hydrous basic carbonate of magnesium, and used as a mild cathartic.
Magnesia alba
Magnesia Mag*ne"si*a (?; 277), n. [L. Magnesia, fem. of Magnesius of the country Magnesia, Gr. ? ? ? a magnet. Cf. Magnet.] (Chem.) A light earthy white substance, consisting of magnesium oxide, and obtained by heating magnesium hydrate or carbonate, or by burning magnesium. It has a slightly alkaline reaction, and is used in medicine as a mild antacid laxative. See Magnesium. Magnesia alba [L.] (Med. Chem.), a bulky white amorphous substance, consisting of a hydrous basic carbonate of magnesium, and used as a mild cathartic.
Magnesian
Magnesian Mag*ne"sian, a. Pertaining to, characterized by, or containing, magnesia or magnesium. Magnesian limestone. (Min.) See Dolomite.
Magnesian limestone
Magnesian Mag*ne"sian, a. Pertaining to, characterized by, or containing, magnesia or magnesium. Magnesian limestone. (Min.) See Dolomite.
Magnesic
Magnesic Mag*ne"sic, a. (Chem.) Pertaining to, or containing, magnesium; as, magnesic oxide.
Magnesium
Magnesium Mag*ne"si*um, n. [NL. & F. See Magnesia.] (Chem.) A light silver-white metallic element, malleable and ductile, quite permanent in dry air but tarnishing in moist air. It burns, forming (the oxide) magnesia, with the production of a blinding light (the so-called magnesium light) which is used in signaling, in pyrotechny, or in photography where a strong actinic illuminant is required. Its compounds occur abundantly, as in dolomite, talc, meerschaum, etc. Symbol Mg. Atomic weight, 24.4. Specific gravity, 1.75. Magnesium sulphate. (Chem.) Same as Epsom salts.

Meaning of Magne from wikipedia

- Magne may refer to: Magne (given name), origin of and people with the given name Magne (surname), origin of and people with the surname HSwMS Magne, several...
- Magne Furuholmen (born 1 November 1962) is a Norwegian musician and visual artist. He was named Knight First Cl**** of the Order of St. Olav by King Harald...
- Magne is a Norwegian masculine given name of Norse origin, meaning "fierce warrior". People with the name include: Magne Aarøen (1944 - 2003), Norwegian...
- Magne or Magné is a French language surname. Its origin is ambiguous, either derived from the Scandinavian language given name Magnus (meaning "great")...
- Magnes may refer to: Magnes (son of Aeolus), in Gr**** mythology, the eponym and first king of Magnesia Magnes (son of Argos), in Gr**** mythology, son...
- to help Charlie run the hotel for his own amu****t. Charlotte "Charlie" Magne (voiced by Jill Harris; singing voice by Elsie Lovelock) is the main protagonist...
- Magné may refer to: Magné, Deux-Sèvres, a commune in the Deux-Sèvres department, France Magné, Vienne, a commune in the Vienne department, France Magné...
- Magne Havnå (16 September 1963 – 29 May 2004), of Arendal, Norway, was a professional boxer who once held the WBO world title in cruiserweight, beating...
- Magne Charge (also known as Magne-Charge, MagneCharge and J1773) is a largely obsolete inductive charging system used to charge battery electric vehicles...
- David Stakston as Magne Seier, the protagonist and reincarnation of the thunder-god Thor Jonas Strand Gravli as Laurits Seier, Magne's brother Herman Tømmeraas...
Loading...