Definition of Macros. Meaning of Macros. Synonyms of Macros

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Macros. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Macros and, of course, Macros synonyms and on the right images related to the word Macros.

Definition of Macros

No result for Macros. Showing similar results...

Macroscopic
Macroscopic Mac`ro*scop"ic, Macroscopical Mac`ro*scop"ic*al, a. [Macro- + Gr. ? to view.] Visible to the unassisted eye; -- as opposed to microscopic. -- Mac`ro*scop"ic*al*ly, adv.
Macroscopical
Macroscopic Mac`ro*scop"ic, Macroscopical Mac`ro*scop"ic*al, a. [Macro- + Gr. ? to view.] Visible to the unassisted eye; -- as opposed to microscopic. -- Mac`ro*scop"ic*al*ly, adv.
Macroscopically
Macroscopic Mac`ro*scop"ic, Macroscopical Mac`ro*scop"ic*al, a. [Macro- + Gr. ? to view.] Visible to the unassisted eye; -- as opposed to microscopic. -- Mac`ro*scop"ic*al*ly, adv.
Macrosila Carolina
Hawk moth Hawk" moth` (?; 115). (Zo["o]l.) Any moth of the family Sphingid[ae], of which there are numerous genera and species. They are large, handsome moths, which fly mostly at twilight and hover about flowers like a humming bird, sucking the honey by means of a long, slender proboscis. The larv[ae] are large, hairless caterpillars ornamented with green and other bright colors, and often with a caudal spine. See Sphinx, also Tobacco worm, and Tomato worm. Tobacco Hawk Moth (Macrosila Carolina), and its Larva, the Tobacco Worm. Note: The larv[ae] of several species of hawk moths feed on grapevines. The elm-tree hawk moth is Ceratomia Amyntor.
Macrosila quinquemaculata
Potato Po*ta"to, n.; pl. Potatoes. [Sp. patata potato, batata sweet potato, from the native American name (probably batata) in Hayti.] (Bot.) (a) A plant (Solanum tuberosum) of the Nightshade family, and its esculent farinaceous tuber, of which there are numerous varieties used for food. It is native of South America, but a form of the species is found native as far north as New Mexico. (b) The sweet potato (see below). Potato beetle, Potato bug. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A beetle (Doryphora decemlineata) which feeds, both in the larval and adult stages, upon the leaves of the potato, often doing great damage. Called also Colorado potato beetle, and Doryphora. See Colorado beetle. (b) The Lema trilineata, a smaller and more slender striped beetle which feeds upon the potato plant, bur does less injury than the preceding species. Potato fly (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of blister beetles infesting the potato vine. The black species (Lytta atrata), the striped (L. vittata), and the gray (L. cinerea, or Fabricii) are the most common. See Blister beetle, under Blister. Potato rot, a disease of the tubers of the potato, supposed to be caused by a kind of mold (Peronospora infestans), which is first seen upon the leaves and stems. Potato weevil (Zo["o]l.), an American weevil (Baridius trinotatus) whose larva lives in and kills the stalks of potato vines, often causing serious damage to the crop. Potato whisky, a strong, fiery liquor, having a hot, smoky taste, and rich in amyl alcohol (fusel oil); it is made from potatoes or potato starch. Potato worm (Zo["o]l.), the large green larva of a sphinx, or hawk moth (Macrosila quinquemaculata); -- called also tomato worm. See Illust. under Tomato. Seaside potato (Bot.), Ipom[oe]a Pes-Capr[ae], a kind of morning-glory with rounded and emarginate or bilobed leaves. [West Indies] Sweet potato (Bot.), a climbing plant (Ipom[oe]a Balatas) allied to the morning-glory. Its farinaceous tubers have a sweetish taste, and are used, when cooked, for food. It is probably a native of Brazil, but is cultivated extensively in the warmer parts of every continent, and even as far north as New Jersey. The name potato was applied to this plant before it was to the Solanum tuberosum, and this is the ``potato' of the Southern United States. Wild potato. (Bot.) (a) A vine (Ipom[oe]a pandurata) having a pale purplish flower and an enormous root. It is common in sandy places in the United States. (b) A similar tropical American plant (I. fastigiata) which it is thought may have been the original stock of the sweet potato.
Macrosiphonia longiflora
Flannel flower Flan"nel flow`er (Bot.) (a) The common mullein. (b) A Brazilian apocynaceous vine (Macrosiphonia longiflora) having woolly leaves. (c) An umbelliferous Australian flower (Actinotus helianthi), often erroneously thought to be composite. The involucre looks as if cut out of white flannel.
Macrosporangium
Macrosporangium Mac`ro*spo*ran"gi*um, n. [NL. See Macro-, and Sporangium.] (Bot.) A sporangium or conceptacle containing only large spores; -- opposed to microsporangium. Both are found in the genera Selaginella, Isoctes, and Marsilia, plants remotely allied to ferns.
Macrospore
Macrospore Mac"ro*spore, n. [Macro- + spore.] (Bot.) One of the specially large spores of certain flowerless plants, as Selaginella, etc.
Macrosporic
Macrosporic Mac`ro*spor"ic, a. (Bot.) Of or pertaining to macrospores.
Sphinx or Macrosila quinquemaculata
Tomato To*ma"to, n.; pl. Tomatoes. [Sp. or Pg. tomate, of American Indian origin; cf. Mexican tomail.] (Bot.) The fruit of a plant of the Nightshade family (Lycopersicum esculentun); also, the plant itself. The fruit, which is called also love apple, is usually of a rounded, flattened form, but often irregular in shape. It is of a bright red or yellow color, and is eaten either cooked or uncooked. Tomato gall (Zo["o]l.), a large gall consisting of a mass of irregular swellings on the stems and leaves of grapevines. They are yellowish green, somewhat tinged with red, and produced by the larva of a small two-winged fly (Lasioptera vitis). Tomato sphinx (Zo["o]l.), the adult or imago of the tomato worm. It closely resembles the tobacco hawk moth. Called also tomato hawk moth. See Illust. of Hawk moth. Tomato worm (Zo["o]l.), the larva of a large hawk moth (Sphinx, or Macrosila, quinquemaculata) which feeds upon the leaves of the tomato and potato plants, often doing considerable damage. Called also potato worm.

Meaning of Macros from wikipedia

- Macro (or MACRO) may refer to: Macroscopic, subjects visible to the eye Macro photography, a type of close-up photography Image macro, a picture with...
- (Thus, they are called "macros" because a "big" block of code can be expanded from a "small" sequence of characters.) Macros often allow positional or...
- OS/360 uses macros to perform system generation. The user specifies options by coding a series of ****embler macros. ****embling these macros generates a...
- occurrence of image macros. Advice animal image macros, also referred to as stock-character macros, are also highly ****ociated with the image macro template. The...
- Chapter 14. Anaphoric Macros Archived April 26, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. of On Lisp by Paul Graham Chapter 14. Anaphoric Macros from On Lisp by Paul...
- being discarded, quotes around `divert' and other macros are needed to prevent expansion. # Macros aren't expanded within comments, meaning that keywords...
- by adding the ability to disable macros completely, to enable macros when opening a workbook or to trust all macros signed using a trusted certificate...
- printing reports, etc. Macros support basic logic (IF-conditions) and the ability to call other macros. Macros can also contain sub-macros which are similar...
- There are two types of macros, object-like and function-like. Object-like macros do not take parameters; function-like macros do (although the list of...
- Usenet: dqgm2f$ije$1@sunnews.cern.ch. Variadic MacrosUsing the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) Variadic Macros (C++) Clang source code change that mentions...
Loading...