Definition of Logie. Meaning of Logie. Synonyms of Logie

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Definition of Logie

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Analogies
Analogy A*nal"o*gy, n.; pl. Analogies. [L. analogia, Gr. ?, fr. ?: cf. F. analogie. See Analogous.] 1. A resemblance of relations; an agreement or likeness between things in some circumstances or effects, when the things are otherwise entirely different. Thus, learning enlightens the mind, because it is to the mind what light is to the eye, enabling it to discover things before hidden. Note: Followed by between, to, or with; as, there is an analogy between these objects, or one thing has an analogy to or with another. Note: Analogy is very commonly used to denote similarity or essential resemblance; but its specific meaning is a similarity of relations, and in this consists the difference between the argument from example and that from analogy. In the former, we argue from the mere similarity of two things; in the latter, from the similarity of their relations. --Karslake. 2. (Biol.) A relation or correspondence in function, between organs or parts which are decidedly different. 3. (Geom.) Proportion; equality of ratios. 4. (Gram.) Conformity of words to the genius, structure, or general rules of a language; similarity of origin, inflection, or principle of pronunciation, and the like, as opposed to anomaly. --Johnson.
Antilogies
Antilogy An*til"o*gy, n.; pl. Antilogies. [Gr. ?, fr. ? contradictory; ? against + ? to speak.] A contradiction between any words or passages in an author. --Sir W. Hamilton.
Chronologies
Chronology Chro*nol"o*gy, n.; pl. Chronologies. [Gr. ?; ? time + ? discourse: cf. F. chronologie.] The science which treats of measuring time by regular divisions or periods, and which assigns to events or transactions their proper dates. If history without chronology is dark and confused, chronology without history is dry and insipid. --A. Holmes.
Dilogies
Dilogy Dil"o*gy, n.; pl. Dilogies. [L. dilogia, Gr. ?, fr. ? doubtful; di- = di`s- twice + ? to speak.] (Rhet.) An ambiguous speech; a figure in which a word is used an equivocal sense. [R.]
Doxologies
Doxology Dox*ol"o*gy, n.; pl. Doxologies. [LL. doxologia, Gr. ?, fr. ? praising, giving glory; ? opinion, estimation, glory, praise (from ? to think, imagine) + ? to speak: cf. F. doxologie. See Dogma, and Legend.] In Christian worship: A hymn expressing praise and honor to God; a form of praise to God designed to be sung or chanted by the choir or the congregation. David breaks forth into these triumphant praises and doxologies. --South.
Eulogies
Eulogy Eu"lo*gy, n.; pl. Eulogies. [Gr. ?, from ? well speaking; ? well + ? to speak. Cf. Eulogium, and see Legend.] A speech or writing in commendation of the character or services of a person; as, a fitting eulogy to worth. Eulogies turn into elegies. --Spenser. Syn: Encomium; praise; panegyric; applause. Usage: Eulogy, Eulogium, Encomium, Panegyric. The idea of praise is common to all these words. The word encomium is used of both persons and things which are the result of human action, and denotes warm praise. Eulogium and eulogy apply only to persons and are more studied and of greater length. A panegyric was originally a set speech in a full assembly of the people, and hence denotes a more formal eulogy, couched in terms of warm and continuous praise, especially as to personal character. We may bestow encomiums on any work of art, on production of genius, without reference to the performer; we bestow eulogies, or pronounce a eulogium, upon some individual distinguished for his merit public services; we pronounce a panegyric before an assembly gathered for the occasion.
Mythologies
Mythology My*thol"o*gy, n.; pl. Mythologies. [F. mythologie, L. mythologia, Gr. myqologi`a; my^qos, fable, myth + lo`gos speech, discourse.] 1. The science which treats of myths; a treatise on myths. 2. A body of myths; esp., the collective myths which describe the gods of a heathen people; as, the mythology of the Greeks.
Pathologies
Pathology Pa*thol"o*gy (-j[y^]), n.; pl. Pathologies (-j[i^]z). [Gr. pa`qos a suffering, disease + -logy: cf. F. pathologie.] (Med.) The science which treats of diseases, their nature, causes, progress, symptoms, etc. Note: Pathology is general or special, according as it treats of disease or morbid processes in general, or of particular diseases; it is also subdivided into internal and external, or medical and surgical pathology. Its departments are nosology, [ae]tiology, morbid anatomy, symptomatology, and therapeutics, which treat respectively of the classification, causation, organic changes, symptoms, and cure of diseases. Celluar pathology, a theory that gives prominence to the vital action of cells in the healthy and diseased function of the body. --Virchow.
Physiologies
Physiology Phys`i*ol"o*gy, n.; pl. Physiologies. [L. physiologia, Gr. ?; fy`sis nature + ? discourse: cf. F. physiologie.] 1. The science which treats of the phenomena of living organisms; the study of the processes incidental to, and characteristic of, life. Note: It is divided into animal and vegetable physiology, dealing with animal and vegetable life respectively. When applied especially to a study of the functions of the organs and tissues in man, it is called human physiology. 2. A treatise on physiology. Mental physiology, the science of the functions and phenomena of the mind, as distinguished from a philosophical explanation of the same.
Psychologies
Psychology Psy*chol"o*gy, n. pl. Psychologies. [Psycho- + -logy: cf. F. psychologie. See Psychical.] The science of the human soul; specifically, the systematic or scientific knowledge of the powers and functions of the human soul, so far as they are known by consciousness; a treatise on the human soul. Psychology, the science conversant about the phenomena of the mind, or conscious subject, or self. --Sir W. Hamilton.
Zoologies
Zoology o*["o]l"o*gy, n.; pl. Zo["o]logies. [Zo["o]- + -logy: cf. F. zoologie. See Zodiac.] 1. That part of biology which relates to the animal kingdom, including the structure, embryology, evolution, classification, habits, and distribution of all animals, both living and extinct. 2. A treatise on this science.

Meaning of Logie from wikipedia

- Logie may refer to: Logie Awards, the Australian television industry awards "The Laird O Logie", children's ballad Logie - One of three Houses, in Wallace...
- John Logie Baird FRSE (/ˈloʊɡi bɛərd/; 13 August 1888 – 14 June 1946) was a Scottish engineer, innovator, one of the inventors of the mechanical television...
- The Logie Awards (officially the TV W**** Logie Awards) is an annual gathering to celebrate Australian television, sponsored and organised by magazine TV...
- Augustine Lawrence Logie (born 28 September 1960), commonly known as Gus Logie, is a former West Indies and Trinidad and Tobago cricketer and is currently...
- The Gold Logie Award for Most Po****r Personality on Australian Television, commonly referred to simply as the Gold Logie, is an award presented annually...
- in Scotland to Anne of Denmark commemorated by the ballad "The Laird o Logie" for rescuing her imprisoned lover. Margaret Winstar's family background...
- is best known for her role as 'Stevie Hall' (later 'Hall-Ryan') in the Logie Award-winning Australian television series McLeod's Daughters, where she...
- two children. 2003 Nominated: Silver Logie for Most Po****r Actress (McLeod's Daughters) 2004 Nominated: Silver Logie for Most Po****r Actress (McLeod's...
- program "Video Smash Hits" on the Seven Network. In 1992, Wilson won the Logie Award for Most Po****r New Talent, as well as being nominated for "Most...
- John H. Logie is an American attorney and politician who served as mayor of Grand Rapids, Michigan from 1992 to 2003. When he backed a city charter amendment...
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