Definition of Ladder. Meaning of Ladder. Synonyms of Ladder

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Definition of Ladder

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Air bladder
Air bladder Air" blad`der 1. (Anat.) An air sac, sometimes double or variously lobed, in the visceral cavity of many fishes. It originates in the same way as the lungs of air-breathing vertebrates, and in the adult may retain a tubular connection with the pharynx or esophagus. 2. A sac or bladder full of air in an animal or plant; also an air hole in a casting.
Bladder
Bladder Blad"der, n. [OE. bladder, bleddre, AS. bl?dre, bl?ddre; akin to Icel. bla?ra, SW. bl["a]ddra, Dan. bl[ae]re, D. blaar, OHG. bl[=a]tara the bladder in the body of animals, G. blatter blister, bustule; all fr. the same root as AS. bl[=a]wan, E. blow, to puff. See Blow to puff.] 1. (Anat.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and inflated with air. 2. Any vesicle or blister, especially if filled with air, or a thin, watery fluid. 3. (Bot.) A distended, membranaceous pericarp. 4. Anything inflated, empty, or unsound. ``To swim with bladders of philosophy.' --Rochester. Bladder nut, or Bladder tree (Bot.), a genus of plants (Staphylea) with bladderlike seed pods. Bladder pod (Bot.), a genus of low herbs (Vesicaria) with inflated seed pods. Bladdor senna (Bot.), a genus of shrubs (Colutea), with membranaceous, inflated pods. Bladder worm (Zo["o]l.), the larva of any species of tapeworm (T[ae]nia), found in the flesh or other parts of animals. See Measle, Cysticercus. Bladder wrack (Bot.), the common black rock weed of the seacoast (Fucus nodosus and F. vesiculosus) -- called also bladder tangle. See Wrack.
Bladder
Bladder Blad"der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Bladdered; p. pr. & vb. n. Bladdering.] 1. To swell out like a bladder with air; to inflate. [Obs.] --G. Fletcher. 2. To put up in bladders; as, bladdered lard.
Bladder campion
Campion Cam"pi*on, n. [Prob. fr. L. campus field.] (Bot.) A plant of the Pink family (Cucubalus bacciferus), bearing berries regarded as poisonous. Bladder campion, a plant of the Pink family (Cucubalus Behen or Silene inflata), having a much inflated calyx. See Behen. Rose campion, a garden plant (Lychnis coronaria) with handsome crimson flowers.
Bladder nut
Bladder Blad"der, n. [OE. bladder, bleddre, AS. bl?dre, bl?ddre; akin to Icel. bla?ra, SW. bl["a]ddra, Dan. bl[ae]re, D. blaar, OHG. bl[=a]tara the bladder in the body of animals, G. blatter blister, bustule; all fr. the same root as AS. bl[=a]wan, E. blow, to puff. See Blow to puff.] 1. (Anat.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and inflated with air. 2. Any vesicle or blister, especially if filled with air, or a thin, watery fluid. 3. (Bot.) A distended, membranaceous pericarp. 4. Anything inflated, empty, or unsound. ``To swim with bladders of philosophy.' --Rochester. Bladder nut, or Bladder tree (Bot.), a genus of plants (Staphylea) with bladderlike seed pods. Bladder pod (Bot.), a genus of low herbs (Vesicaria) with inflated seed pods. Bladdor senna (Bot.), a genus of shrubs (Colutea), with membranaceous, inflated pods. Bladder worm (Zo["o]l.), the larva of any species of tapeworm (T[ae]nia), found in the flesh or other parts of animals. See Measle, Cysticercus. Bladder wrack (Bot.), the common black rock weed of the seacoast (Fucus nodosus and F. vesiculosus) -- called also bladder tangle. See Wrack.
Bladder pod
Bladder Blad"der, n. [OE. bladder, bleddre, AS. bl?dre, bl?ddre; akin to Icel. bla?ra, SW. bl["a]ddra, Dan. bl[ae]re, D. blaar, OHG. bl[=a]tara the bladder in the body of animals, G. blatter blister, bustule; all fr. the same root as AS. bl[=a]wan, E. blow, to puff. See Blow to puff.] 1. (Anat.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and inflated with air. 2. Any vesicle or blister, especially if filled with air, or a thin, watery fluid. 3. (Bot.) A distended, membranaceous pericarp. 4. Anything inflated, empty, or unsound. ``To swim with bladders of philosophy.' --Rochester. Bladder nut, or Bladder tree (Bot.), a genus of plants (Staphylea) with bladderlike seed pods. Bladder pod (Bot.), a genus of low herbs (Vesicaria) with inflated seed pods. Bladdor senna (Bot.), a genus of shrubs (Colutea), with membranaceous, inflated pods. Bladder worm (Zo["o]l.), the larva of any species of tapeworm (T[ae]nia), found in the flesh or other parts of animals. See Measle, Cysticercus. Bladder wrack (Bot.), the common black rock weed of the seacoast (Fucus nodosus and F. vesiculosus) -- called also bladder tangle. See Wrack.
bladder tangle
Bladder Blad"der, n. [OE. bladder, bleddre, AS. bl?dre, bl?ddre; akin to Icel. bla?ra, SW. bl["a]ddra, Dan. bl[ae]re, D. blaar, OHG. bl[=a]tara the bladder in the body of animals, G. blatter blister, bustule; all fr. the same root as AS. bl[=a]wan, E. blow, to puff. See Blow to puff.] 1. (Anat.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and inflated with air. 2. Any vesicle or blister, especially if filled with air, or a thin, watery fluid. 3. (Bot.) A distended, membranaceous pericarp. 4. Anything inflated, empty, or unsound. ``To swim with bladders of philosophy.' --Rochester. Bladder nut, or Bladder tree (Bot.), a genus of plants (Staphylea) with bladderlike seed pods. Bladder pod (Bot.), a genus of low herbs (Vesicaria) with inflated seed pods. Bladdor senna (Bot.), a genus of shrubs (Colutea), with membranaceous, inflated pods. Bladder worm (Zo["o]l.), the larva of any species of tapeworm (T[ae]nia), found in the flesh or other parts of animals. See Measle, Cysticercus. Bladder wrack (Bot.), the common black rock weed of the seacoast (Fucus nodosus and F. vesiculosus) -- called also bladder tangle. See Wrack.
Bladder tree
Bladder Blad"der, n. [OE. bladder, bleddre, AS. bl?dre, bl?ddre; akin to Icel. bla?ra, SW. bl["a]ddra, Dan. bl[ae]re, D. blaar, OHG. bl[=a]tara the bladder in the body of animals, G. blatter blister, bustule; all fr. the same root as AS. bl[=a]wan, E. blow, to puff. See Blow to puff.] 1. (Anat.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and inflated with air. 2. Any vesicle or blister, especially if filled with air, or a thin, watery fluid. 3. (Bot.) A distended, membranaceous pericarp. 4. Anything inflated, empty, or unsound. ``To swim with bladders of philosophy.' --Rochester. Bladder nut, or Bladder tree (Bot.), a genus of plants (Staphylea) with bladderlike seed pods. Bladder pod (Bot.), a genus of low herbs (Vesicaria) with inflated seed pods. Bladdor senna (Bot.), a genus of shrubs (Colutea), with membranaceous, inflated pods. Bladder worm (Zo["o]l.), the larva of any species of tapeworm (T[ae]nia), found in the flesh or other parts of animals. See Measle, Cysticercus. Bladder wrack (Bot.), the common black rock weed of the seacoast (Fucus nodosus and F. vesiculosus) -- called also bladder tangle. See Wrack.
Bladder worm
Bladder Blad"der, n. [OE. bladder, bleddre, AS. bl?dre, bl?ddre; akin to Icel. bla?ra, SW. bl["a]ddra, Dan. bl[ae]re, D. blaar, OHG. bl[=a]tara the bladder in the body of animals, G. blatter blister, bustule; all fr. the same root as AS. bl[=a]wan, E. blow, to puff. See Blow to puff.] 1. (Anat.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and inflated with air. 2. Any vesicle or blister, especially if filled with air, or a thin, watery fluid. 3. (Bot.) A distended, membranaceous pericarp. 4. Anything inflated, empty, or unsound. ``To swim with bladders of philosophy.' --Rochester. Bladder nut, or Bladder tree (Bot.), a genus of plants (Staphylea) with bladderlike seed pods. Bladder pod (Bot.), a genus of low herbs (Vesicaria) with inflated seed pods. Bladdor senna (Bot.), a genus of shrubs (Colutea), with membranaceous, inflated pods. Bladder worm (Zo["o]l.), the larva of any species of tapeworm (T[ae]nia), found in the flesh or other parts of animals. See Measle, Cysticercus. Bladder wrack (Bot.), the common black rock weed of the seacoast (Fucus nodosus and F. vesiculosus) -- called also bladder tangle. See Wrack.
bladder worm
Cysticerce Cys"ti*cerce (s?s"t?-s?rs), Cysticercus Cys`ti*cer"cus (-s?r"k?s), n. [NL. cysticercus, fr. Gr. ???? bladder + ???? tail: cf. F. cysticerque.] (Zo["o]l.) The larval form of a tapeworm, having the head and neck of a tapeworm attached to a saclike body filled with fluid; -- called also bladder worm, hydatid, and measle (as, pork measle). Note: These larvae live in the tissues of various living animals, and, when swallowed by a suitable carnivorous animal, develop into adult tapeworms in the intestine. See Measles, 4, Tapeworm.
bladder worms
2. (Veter. Med.) A disease of cattle and swine in which the flesh is filled with the embryos of different varieties of the tapeworm. 3. A disease of trees. [Obs.] 4. pl. (Zo["o]l.) The larv[ae] of any tapeworm (T[ae]nia) in the cysticerus stage, when contained in meat. Called also bladder worms.
Bladder wrack
Bladder Blad"der, n. [OE. bladder, bleddre, AS. bl?dre, bl?ddre; akin to Icel. bla?ra, SW. bl["a]ddra, Dan. bl[ae]re, D. blaar, OHG. bl[=a]tara the bladder in the body of animals, G. blatter blister, bustule; all fr. the same root as AS. bl[=a]wan, E. blow, to puff. See Blow to puff.] 1. (Anat.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and inflated with air. 2. Any vesicle or blister, especially if filled with air, or a thin, watery fluid. 3. (Bot.) A distended, membranaceous pericarp. 4. Anything inflated, empty, or unsound. ``To swim with bladders of philosophy.' --Rochester. Bladder nut, or Bladder tree (Bot.), a genus of plants (Staphylea) with bladderlike seed pods. Bladder pod (Bot.), a genus of low herbs (Vesicaria) with inflated seed pods. Bladdor senna (Bot.), a genus of shrubs (Colutea), with membranaceous, inflated pods. Bladder worm (Zo["o]l.), the larva of any species of tapeworm (T[ae]nia), found in the flesh or other parts of animals. See Measle, Cysticercus. Bladder wrack (Bot.), the common black rock weed of the seacoast (Fucus nodosus and F. vesiculosus) -- called also bladder tangle. See Wrack.
Bladdered
Bladder Blad"der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Bladdered; p. pr. & vb. n. Bladdering.] 1. To swell out like a bladder with air; to inflate. [Obs.] --G. Fletcher. 2. To put up in bladders; as, bladdered lard.
Bladdering
Bladder Blad"der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Bladdered; p. pr. & vb. n. Bladdering.] 1. To swell out like a bladder with air; to inflate. [Obs.] --G. Fletcher. 2. To put up in bladders; as, bladdered lard.
Bladderwort
Bladderwort Blad"der*wort`, n. (Bot.) A genus (Utricularia) of aquatic or marshy plants, which usually bear numerous vesicles in the divisions of the leaves. These serve as traps for minute animals. See Ascidium.
Bladdery
Bladdery Blad"der*y, a. Having bladders; also, resembling a bladder.
Companion ladder
Companion Com*pan"ion, n. [F. compagnon, OF. compaing, fr. an assumed LL. companio (cf. companium fellowship, a mess), fr. L. com- + panis bread. See Pantry.] 1. One who accompanies or is in company with another for a longer or shorter period, either from choice or casually; one who is much in the company of, or is associated with, another or others; an associate; a comrade; a consort; a partner. The companions of his fall. --Milton. The companion of fools shall smart for it. --Prov. xiii. 20 (Rev. Ver.). Here are your sons again; and I must lose Two of the sweetest companions in the world. --Shak. A companion is one with whom we share our bread; a messmate. --Trench. 2. A knight of the lowest rank in certain orders; as, a companion of the Bath. 3. A fellow; -- in contempt. [Obs.] --Shak. 4. [Cf. OSp. compa[~n]a an outhouse, office.] (Naut.) (a) A skylight on an upper deck with frames and sashes of various shapes, to admit light to a cabin or lower deck. (b) A wooden hood or penthouse covering the companion way; a companion hatch. Companion hatch (Naut.), a wooden porch over the entrance or staircase of the cabin. Companion ladder (Naut.), the ladder by which officers ascend to, or descend from, the quarter-deck. --Totten. Companion way (Naut.), a staircase leading to the cabin. Knights companions, in certain honorary orders, the members of the lowest grades as distinguished from knights commanders, knights grand cross, and the like. Syn: Associate; comrade; mate; compeer; partner; ally; confederate; coadjutor; accomplice.
Gall bladder
Gall Gall, n.[OE. galle, gal, AS. gealla; akin to D. gal, OS. & OHG. galla, Icel. gall, SW. galla, Dan. galde, L. fel, Gr. ?, and prob. to E. yellow. ? See Yellow, and cf. Choler] 1. (Physiol.) The bitter, alkaline, viscid fluid found in the gall bladder, beneath the liver. It consists of the secretion of the liver, or bile, mixed with that of the mucous membrane of the gall bladder. 2. The gall bladder. 3. Anything extremely bitter; bitterness; rancor. He hath . . . compassed me with gall and travail. --Lam. iii. 5. Comedy diverted without gall. --Dryden. 4. Impudence; brazen assurance. [Slang] Gall bladder (Anat.), the membranous sac, in which the bile, or gall, is stored up, as secreted by the liver; the cholecystis. See Illust. of Digestive apparatus. Gall duct, a duct which conveys bile, as the cystic duct, or the hepatic duct. Gall sickness, a remitting bilious fever in the Netherlands. --Dunglison. Gall of the earth (Bot.), an herbaceous composite plant with variously lobed and cleft leaves, usually the Prenanthes serpentaria.
Gangway ladder
Gangway Gang"way`, n. [See Gang, v. i.] 1. A passage or way into or out of any inclosed place; esp., a temporary way of access formed of planks. 2. In the English House of Commons, a narrow aisle across the house, below which sit those who do not vote steadly either with the government or with the opposition. 3. (Naut.) The opening through the bulwarks of a vessel by which persons enter or leave it. 4. (Naut.) That part of the spar deck of a vessel on each side of the booms, from the quarter-deck to the forecastle; -- more properly termed the waist. --Totten. Gangway ladder, a ladder rigged on the side of a vessel at the gangway. To bring to the gangway, to punish (a seaman) by flogging him at the gangway.
Gladder
Gladder Glad"der, n. One who makes glad. --Chaucer.
ladder shell
Scalaria Sca*la"ri*a, n. [L., flight of steps.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of marine gastropods of the genus Scalaria, or family Scalarid[ae], having elongated spiral turreted shells, with rounded whorls, usually crossed by ribs or varices. The color is generally white or pale. Called also ladder shell, and wentletrap. See Ptenoglossa, and Wentletrap.
Salmon ladder
Note: The salmons ascend rivers and penetrate to their head streams to spawn. They are remarkably strong fishes, and will even leap over considerable falls which lie in the way of their progress. The common salmon has been known to grow to the weight of seventy-five pounds; more generally it is from fifteen to twenty-five pounds. Young salmon are called parr, peal, smolt, and grilse. Among the true salmons are: Black salmon, or Lake salmon, the namaycush. Dog salmon, a salmon of Western North America (Oncorhynchus keta). Humpbacked salmon, a Pacific-coast salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). King salmon, the quinnat. Landlocked salmon, a variety of the common salmon (var. Sebago), long confined in certain lakes in consequence of obstructions that prevented it from returning to the sea. This last is called also dwarf salmon. Note: Among fishes of other families which are locally and erroneously called salmon are: the pike perch, called jack salmon; the spotted, or southern, squeteague; the cabrilla, called kelp salmon; young pollock, called sea salmon; and the California yellowtail. 2. A reddish yellow or orange color, like the flesh of the salmon. Salmon berry (Bot.), a large red raspberry growing from Alaska to California, the fruit of the Rubus Nutkanus. Salmon killer (Zo["o]l.), a stickleback (Gasterosteus cataphractus) of Western North America and Northern Asia. Salmon ladder, Salmon stair. See Fish ladder, under Fish. Salmon peel, a young salmon. Salmon pipe, a certain device for catching salmon. --Crabb. Salmon trout. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The European sea trout (Salmo trutta). It resembles the salmon, but is smaller, and has smaller and more numerous scales. (b) The American namaycush. (c) A name that is also applied locally to the adult black spotted trout (Salmo purpuratus), and to the steel head and other large trout of the Pacific coast.
Stepladder
Stepladder Step"lad`der, n. A portable set of steps.
Swim bladder
Swim Swim, n. 1. The act of swimming; a gliding motion, like that of one swimming. --B. Jonson. 2. The sound, or air bladder, of a fish. 3. A part of a stream much frequented by fish. [Eng.] Swim bladder, an air bladder of a fish. To be in the swim, to be in a favored position; to be associated with others in active affairs. [Colloq.]

Meaning of Ladder from wikipedia

- A ladder is a vertical or inclined set of rungs or steps. There are two types: rigid ladders that are self-supporting or that may be leaned against a vertical...
- Jacob's Ladder is a 1990 American psychological horror film directed by Adrian Lyne, produced by Alan Marshall, written by Bruce Joel Rubin and starring...
- Jacob's Ladder (Hebrew: סולם יעקב Sulam Yaakov) is a ladder leading to heaven that was featured in a dream the biblical Patriarch Jacob had during his...
- Jacob's Ladder is an upcoming American psychological horror film directed by David M. Rosenthal and written by Jeff Buhler and Sarah Thorp. It is a reimagining...
- Jacob's Ladder is a staircase to heaven from a dream of Jacob described in the Old Testament. Jacob's Ladder may also refer to: Jacob's Ladder (1990 film)...
- Ladder toss (also known as ladder ball, ladder golf, ball rope and hillbilly golf and other names) is a lawn game pla**** by throwing bolas (two balls connected...
- Ladder 49 is a 2004 American drama film directed by Jay Russell and written by Lewis Colick. The film follows Baltimore firefighter Jack Morrison, who...
- A ladder is a runged climbing aid. Ladder, The Ladder, or Ladders may also refer to: Ladder, a vertical split in the fabric of a pair of tights (UK terminology;...
- Ladder logic was originally a written method to do****ent the design and construction of relay racks as used in manufacturing and process control. Each...
- An accommodation ladder is a portable flight of steps down a ship's side. Accommodation ladders can be mounted parallel or perpendicular to the ship's...
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